Annapolis Farewell


1h 25m 1935

Film Details

Also Known As
Target
Release Date
Sep 6, 1935
Premiere Information
triple premiere: New York, Washington, D.C. and San Diego: 15 Aug 1935
Production Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Annapolis--United States Naval Academy, Maryland, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Target" by Stephen Morehouse Avery (publication undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,683ft (9 reels)

Synopsis

At the Annapolis Naval Academy, retired Commodore Fitzhugh, who is disillusioned by the state of the modern navy, reminisces about his days as Commander of the U.S.S. Congress and in particular his participation in the Battle of Manila Bay under Admiral Dewey. Among the newly arrived plebes are Morton "Click" Haley, younger brother to senior class officer Duncan Haley, and Boyce Avery. Click's mind is more on football and girls than on the navy, and he gets into trouble when he tells Duncan that Boyce is sick in order to take Boyce's out-of-town girl friend, Madeleine Deming, to the June ball. Click meets Madeleine at the train station and escorts her to Fitzhugh's house. Because Click has expressed a specious interest in the commander's Congress stories, Fitzhugh agrees to let Madeleine stay at his home. When Duncan discovers Click's scheme, he orders him to find a four-leaf clover in the football field, causing Click to miss the ball. Click, however, refuses to tell Boyce where Madeleine is staying, and Madeleine finally tells Fitzhugh it is up to him to save the name of the navy by taking her to the dance. There, the commander pridefully leads a march around the dance floor to "Stars and Stripes Forever" and confesses to Madeleine he has experienced the happiest moment of his life. Later, at graduation ceremonies, rumors spread that Duncan will be quitting the navy for a professional football career, but Duncan remains loyal to the navy. While the Congress is docked in the harbor, Fitzhugh, looking fondly off to sea, calls it his ship. Click, bitter about his own father's fate in the navy, warns Duncan that the navy will parade Duncan around then use him for target practice as they have the Congress . Fitzhugh overhears this remark and Click cruelly tells him they are going to sink his ship. Fitzhugh appeals to naval authorities to save the ship, but is met with indifference. Grief-stricken, Fitzhugh relives the Battle at Manila Bay in his mind, then orders a sailor to row him out to the boat. While Fitzhugh sleeps inside the ship, it is towed off Cape Henry for target practice. He wakes, disoriented, believing he is back in the past, and when the sailors attack from shore, he believes the battle is raging. As water pours into the ship, the commander is hit over the head and, whispering that he is part of one of the great moments of history, sinks with the ship. On shore, Fitzhugh's faithful servant, Miranda, reports the commander missing and says she saw him being rowed to the ship. Click accuses himself of killing the commander because he was the gunner who affected a direct hit on the bridge. At Fitzhugh's funeral, he is eulogized for living by the words "don't give up the ship." Click, Boyce and Duncan cry in remembrance of a great navy man.

Cast

Sir Guy Standing

Commodore Fitzhugh

Rosalind Keith

Madeleine Deming

Tom Brown

Morton "Click" Haley

Richard Cromwell

Boyce Avery

John Howard

Duncan Haley

Benny Baker

Zimmer

Louise Beavers

Miranda

Minor Watson

Commander Briggs

Ben Alexander

Adams

John Darrow

Porter

William Collier Sr.

Bumboat Charlie

U.s. Naval Academy

Dorothy Vaughan

Chaperone

Oscar Rudolph

Clayton Beale

Frank Losee

Inspection officer

Richard (tex) Brodus

Jim Stockton

Samuel S. Hinds

Dr. Bryant

Wheeler Oakman

Commander Lawson

Harry Strang

Signal officer

Jack Keats

Young

Hal Craig

Dictograph voice

Dick Wright

Messenger

John Morley

First upper classman

Clyde Fillmore

Lieutenant commander

Lyster Chambers

Lieutenant commander

Fred Leslie

Lieutenant senior grade

George Glass

Lieutenant Junior Grade

Brady Kline

White House policeman

Kenneth Howell

David David

Fred "snowflake" Toones

Black taxi driver

Marie Stevens

Woman at door

Harvey Clark

Kincaid

George Knowles

Plebe messenger

Lt. (j.g.) Edward A. Hutchinson

First officer

Ernest Van Pelt

Officer in Brigg's office

Stanley Andrews

Officer in Brigg's office

Edward Hinkley

Officer in Brigg's office

William Arnold

Officer in Brigg's office

David Newell

Lieutenant in Brigg's office

Guy Usher

Admiral

Allen Pike

Midshipman

Bob Ward

Lieutenant

Charles Sullivan

Sailor

Larry Wheat

Radio officer

Joseph W. Girard

Officer on Congress

Burr Caruth

Officer on Congress

Lew Kelly

Officer on Congress

Thomas Curran

Officer on Congress

Jack Chapin

Ensign

David Carlyle

Ensign

Robert Hoover

Ensign

William Newell

Ensign

Jack Glenn

Harvey Wenzmuller

Film Details

Also Known As
Target
Release Date
Sep 6, 1935
Premiere Information
triple premiere: New York, Washington, D.C. and San Diego: 15 Aug 1935
Production Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Annapolis--United States Naval Academy, Maryland, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Target" by Stephen Morehouse Avery (publication undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,683ft (9 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

This film is dedicated to "our Navy...its officers and men...in particular the officers and midshipmen of the U.S. Naval Academy." A working title for this film was Target. According to Daily Variety, the preview running time was 90 minutes, suggesting that considerable footage was edited out before general release. According to news items in Film Daily in early April 1935, at various times, Henry Hathaway and Lewis Milestone were set to direct this film, which was shot at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. On May 7, 1935, Daily Variety reported that the day before, a TWA airplane carrying an advance crew who were to shoot exteriors at the Naval Academy, crashed in Macon, MO, killing four. Among those who died was U.S. Senator Bronson Cutting of New Mexico. Among those injured were director Richard Wallace and unit manager Paul Wing (actress Toby Wing's father). An entire new crew was recruited, and Alexander Hall took over as director, although the studio had wanted to recruit Alfred Santell, who was not available. According to a January 22, 1936 news item in Hollywood Reporter, Henry T. Sharp, who had been scheduled to photograph this film prior to the plane crash, sued TWA for $513,000 damages, charging negligence in the operation of the airplane. Daily Variety reported on May 17, 1935 that an epidemic of scarlet fever in Annapolis had forced the crew to take lodging in Baltimore and commute to Annapolis for filming. On June 25, 1935, Hollywood Reporter reported that actor John Cox changed his name to John Howard. This is the first film in which he was billed by his new name.