Angel's Holiday


1h 11m 1937

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 7, 1937
Premiere Information
Brooklyn opening: 21 May 1937
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 11m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,565ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

June "Angel" Everett, the pesky young daughter of mystery writer Waldo Everett, disturbs a train conductor late one night as she reads aloud a story from a detective magazine and acts out all the roles. After the train stops unexpectedly and a mysterious passenger boards, June listens at her door as a just-delivered telegram is read. Inside, Stivers, the female companion of screen celebrity Pauline Kaye, reads instructions from Pauline's manager Crandall to go to a particular apartment house in the city and register under a phony name. Upon arriving in the city, Waldo, who is going to Chicago on business, takes June to stay with his brother Ralph, a newspaper editor. Meanwhile, Pauline, who was returning to her hometown for a movie premiere, has disappeared. When reporter Nick Moore, who once broke a date with Pauline when she was a hatcheck girl, refuses Ralph's order to find her because Nick thinks that the disappearance is a publicity stunt, Ralph fires him. However, Nick, with whom June is infatuated, learns that June knows Pauline's whereabouts and convinces Ralph to let him get the story. When they meet, Pauline's and Nick's evident pleasure in seeing each other arouses the jealousy of June, who wants to marry Nick when she is older. June convinces Nick to run the story of Pauline's hoax, and afterwards, Pauline, furious at Nick's betrayal, disappears again, going this time to her grandfather's farm. After Crandall reports that she has been kidnapped, June, at police headquarters, sees Pauline's bodyguard, Butch Broder, hide a map to the farm which Pauline drew. June agrees to keep the map while Butch is interrogated, and she then causes havoc by pulling the pin of a tear gas bomb and pushing alarm buttons. Outside, she refuses to give Butch the map back until he buys her an ice-cream soda, and she tries to overcome her feelings of jealousy. Feeling repentant for causing Pauline to get angry at Nick, June leaves the map for Nick to find and leads Butch to the farm, where she confesses to Pauline that she made Nick print the story. Gangster Bat Regan, who has been tailing Butch, arrives and sends his henchman Gus to get $20,000 in ransom for Pauline from Crandall. When Nick arrives, he is captured, and he reconciles with Pauline. After June overhears the gang plan their next meeting at a poolhall, she escapes and tries to tell the police chief, but he orders her out. Bat takes Pauline and Nick to the poolroom, and June calls the police and reports that murder and a riot is occurring at the poolhall. The police arrive and the chief is about to arrest June, when Nick, from a window, gets their attention by fighting Bat. The place is raided, and afterwards, June, who has made headlines for the rescue, goes home with her father.

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 7, 1937
Premiere Information
Brooklyn opening: 21 May 1937
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 11m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,565ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The original screen story was entitled "Twenty-Four Hours." According to Hollywood Reporter news items, Rochelle Hudson was originally cast as "Pauline Kaye," but she instead took over the lead role from Arline Judge in She Had to Eat (see below) when Judge was granted a six-month leave of absence by Twentieth Century-Fox. Frances Drake was first announced as Hudson's replacement before Sally Blane got the role. In this film, Jane Withers performs a song while imitating Martha Raye, and Al Lydell, according to Hollywood Reporter, "does his well-remembered vaudeville routine as the girl's grandpa." According to information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, a scene was shot in which Withers impersonated George Burns and Gracie Allen, but it did not appear in the release print. Robert Kent is listed second in cast credits in all reviews, the listings in the copyright descriptions and in Fox trade advertising records, and in the opening credits of the print viewed, but he is listed fourth in the end credits.