Bolt


1h 36m 2008

Brief Synopsis

For super-dog Bolt, every day is filled with adventure, danger and intrigue--at least until the cameras stop rolling. When the star of a hit TV show is accidentally shipped from his Hollywood soundstage to New York City, he begins his biggest adventure yet--a cross-country journey through the real w

Film Details

Also Known As
American Dog, Bolt 3D, Formerly American Dog
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2008
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Synopsis

For super-dog Bolt, every day is filled with adventure, danger and intrigue--at least until the cameras stop rolling. When the star of a hit TV show is accidentally shipped from his Hollywood soundstage to New York City, he begins his biggest adventure yet--a cross-country journey through the real world to get back to his owner and co-star, Penny. Armed only with the delusions that all his amazing feats and powers are real and the help of two unlikely traveling companions--a jaded, abandoned housecat named Mittens and a TV-obsessed hamster named Rhino--Bolt discovers he doesn't need superpowers to be a hero.

Crew

Brad Achorn

Animation Director

Brett Achorn

Software Engineer

Natalie Acosta

Software Engineer

Douglas Addy

Digital Effects Artist

Patricia Adefolayan

Special Effects Coordinator

David Adler

Software Engineer

Jon Aghassian

Layout Artist

David Aguilar

Software Engineer

Eileen Aguirre

Assistant

Peter Alexander

Software Engineer

Jason Anastas

Animator

Joan Kim Anastas

Digital Effects Artist

Cassandra Anderson

Assistant

Heidi Anderson

Production

Stephen J Anderson

Adr Voice Casting

Stephen J Anderson

Storyboard Artist

Cinzia Angelini

Animator

Pete Anthony

Original Music

Virgilio John Aquino

Character Animation

Mark Anthony Austin

Animator

Steven Royce Avila

Production Assistant

Querquia Backman

Production Assistant

Melissa Bada

Software Engineer

Robert Bagley

Film Lab

Irfan I Baig

Software Engineer

Kathleen M Bailey

Character Animation

James Baker

Animator

Thomas Baker

Layout Artist

Marie-claude Banville

Other

Leonardo Sanchez Barbosa

Modelmaker

Rowena Barcelona-nuqui

Finance Manager

Elise Barkan

Other

Mark Barnes

Software Engineer

Hank Barrio

Software Engineer

Janice Bastian

Production

Maurice Bastian

Digital Effects Artist

Scott Beattie

Layout Artist

Dale R Beck

Software Engineer

Patricia Beckmann-wells

Software Engineer

Mary Beech

Other

Michael Belzer

Animator

Laurent Ben-mimoun

Production

Carlos Benavides

Other

Doug Bennett

Animation Supervisor

Jason L Bergman

Software Engineer

Janet E Berlin

Software Engineer

James C Bette

Software Engineer

Allen Blaisdell

Layout Artist

Cathy E Blanco

Production

Brian Blasiak

Digital Effects Artist

Rufus Blow

Production

Brett Boggs

Animator

Richard Bomberger

Software Engineer

Kathy Bond

Other

David Booth

Camera Operator

Roger Borelli

Production

Erik J Borzi

Digital Effects Artist

Alan Botvinick

Production

Joe Bowers

Animator

Charline F Boyer

Other

Edward Derian Boyke

Layout Artist

Melissa Bradford

Software Engineer

Holly E Bratton

Production Manager

Rebecca Wilson Bresee

Animator

Jill Breznican

Animator

Christin Ciaccio Briggs

Adr Voice Casting

Christin Ciaccio Briggs

Production Manager

Paul Briggs

Storyboard Artist

Philippe Brochu

Modelmaker

Dale Brodt

Production Manager

Paul Bronkar

Colorist

Barbara Ann Brooks

Software Engineer

Brad Brooks

Software Engineer

Tina Pedigo Brooks

Software Engineer

Justin Brunett

Production Assistant

Barry Brysman

Other

Chantal Beck Bumgarner

Other

Thomas Burge

Software Engineer

Brent Burley

Software Engineer

Scott Burris

Software Engineer

Michael Burston

Song

Darrin Butters

Animator

Carlos Cabral

Character Designer

Tony Cabrera

Animator

Philip Campbell

Song

Scott A Campbell

Other

Susan Campbell

Production

Dan Candela

Software Engineer

Nicola Candussi

Software Engineer

Keanan Cantrell

Digital Effects Artist

Edgar Cardoza

Other

Britton Carducci

Production Assistant

Jesse Carlson

Character Animation

Mark R Carlson

Software Engineer

Mark T Carlson

Software Engineer

Tom Carlson

Music Editor

Bevin Carnes

Animator

Fox Carney

Animator

Steven C Carpenter

Software Engineer

William T Carpenter

Software Engineer

Lauren Carr

Character Animation

Gil Carreras

Color Timer

Katie Carter

Production Assistant

Craig Caton-largent

Character Animation

Rey Cervantes

Other

Ashley Chafin

Music Coordinator

Lawrence Chai

Software Engineer

Chen-yi Chang

Character Designer

Dave Channing

Music Editor

Katie Cheang

Animator

Gina Y Chen

Software Engineer

Ginger Wei-hsien Chen

Other

Kevin Chesnos

Animator

Kent K Chiu

Software Engineer

Rikki Chobanian

Animator

Youngjae Choi

Animator

Daniel Chong

Storyboard Artist

Tenny Chonin

Other

Simon Christen

Animator

June Christopher

Adr Voice Casting

Peter L Chun

Software Engineer

David J Chung

Assistant Editor

Tracy Lee Church

Animation Director

Glen Claybrook

Character Animation

Charles Colladay

Animation Director

Patti Conklin

Assistant

Kevin C Constantine

Software Engineer

Brandy Contreras

Other

Ian J Coony

Animator

Allen Corcorran

Animation Director

Christopher Cordingley

Animator

Jenn Corrigan

Other

Tom Corrigan

Software Engineer

Murilo Coutinho

Production

David Cowgill

Adr Voice Casting

Tom Craigen

Digital Effects Artist

Tammy Crosson

Animator

Miley Cyrus

Song Performer

Miley Cyrus

Song

Vince D'amore

Software Engineer

Colette Dahanne

Foley Mixer

Glenn Dakake

Film Lab

Patrick Dalton

Animator

Sharon Danel

Software Engineer

Bob Davies

Animator

Mark Dawson

Software Engineer

Benny De Franco

Other

Charles E Deal

Production

Jessica Dearborn

Other

Margaret A Decker

Software Engineer

Stephanie Anne Dejohn

Assistant

Micael Delaoglou

Song

Peter Demund

Animator

Teunis Deraat

Production

Mike Devries

Other

Brian Dinkins

Sound Mixer

Lino Disalvo

Animator

Michael J Dobson

Software Engineer

Chris Doehling

Animator

George Doering

Music

Leticia Dominguez

Assistant

Renato Dos Anjos

Animator

Terri Douglas

Casting

Terri Douglas

Adr Voice Casting

Kathryn Dowler

Animator

Elena Driskill

Software Engineer

Hank Driskill

Technical Supervisor

Emanuel Druckmann

Production

Pamela Dugan

Other

Bruce Dukov

Music

Brendan Duncan

Software Engineer

Ryan Duncan

Animation Director

Adam Dykstra

Animator

Colin Eckart

Background Painter

Sean Eckols

Production

Amy Edwards

Digital Effects Artist

Koji Egawa

Consultant

Kelly Eisert

Production Assistant

Eric Elrod

Production Assistant

Mark Empey

Cg Supervisor

Doug Engalla

Animator

Sean England

Foley Recordist

Carlos C Estiandan

Software Engineer

Erik Eulen

Layout Artist

Frank Eulner

Supervising Sound Editor

Nancy Evans

Other

William Fadness

Digital Effects Supervisor

Norbert Faerstain

Software Engineer

Yun-po Paul Fan

Software Engineer

Melissa Cole Fanfassian

Other

Paul Felix

Art Director

Heather L Feng

Assistant

Andre Fenley

Supervising Sound Editor

Brian Ferguson

Animator

Chadd Ferron

Animator

Katie A. Fico

Digital Effects Artist

Lara Filbert

Production Assistant

James Aaron Finch

Production

Jim Finn

Matte Painter

Darren Fisher

Digital Effects Artist

Film Details

Also Known As
American Dog, Bolt 3D, Formerly American Dog
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2008
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Articles

James Ellroy: American Dog - James Ellroy, Author of L.A. Confidential, is the Subject of the Documentary, AMERICAN DOG, on DVD


The celebrated author of police stories and reigning expert on the 1940-1960 Los Angeles crime scene takes center stage in the eccentric and mannered James Ellroy: "American Dog", a glossy documentary that covers the same ground as Ellroy's autobiographical book My Dark Pages. Ellroy's life and career is a chronicle of obsessions that would give any film noir protagonist a run for his money. His mother was murdered when he was a child, an experience that, if the author is to be believed, determined the course of his life from that point onward.

This documentary-essay puts James Ellroy front and center, and he's an overpowering character. As a speaker he's simultaneously very articulate and very profane, an uncomfortable combination. His descriptions of his childhood discovery of a sleazy underside to everyday life are peppered with words that are, depending on one's point of view, either frank and accurate or offensively aggressive. His disclosures about his own checkered past carry an intense charge of noir romanticism. Ellroy may not be bragging about his nefarious life as a homeless peeping tom, but he's not contrite, either.

The show examines Ellroy's world and the mystique of Los Angeles as a place that beckons the ambitious and the foolhardy: "They come on vacation and leave on probation." Backward looks into history set up the twin homicides that formed Ellroy's young consciousness, the savage 1947 Black Dahlia killing and his own mother's murder in 1958. Somewhere along the line the subject of film noir enters. Ellroy partially linking it with his own work by saying that real detectives love the fantasy of Otto Preminger's Laura, wherein an investigator carries on a romance with a murder victim!

James Ellroy: "American Dog" follows its subject to various crime scenes and allows him to address the camera directly, narrating his own inner thoughts or reciting relevant passages from My Dark Pages and other books. Other speakers comment on the author in interviews staged in appropriate locales. Los Angeles Police Chief and Ellroy fan William Bratton stands in uniform before a bank of flags and praises the effect of Ellroy's books on the image of the LAPD. Retired detective William Stoner sits at the bar in the Frolic Room on Hollywood Blvd. to explain how Ellroy hired him to investigate his mother's murder 37 years after the fact. Actress Dana Delany tells us that Ellroy used her real name as a character in one of his books, a murder story about depraved lowlifes. Ellroy discusses his work with author Bruce Wagner but is mostly on screen by himself, ambling through the courtyard of the American Cinematheque (formerly the Egyptian Theater) or loitering around atmospheric downtown street corners. With his distinctive walk and Hawaiian shirts, Ellroy seems born to the neon and dark alleys.

Cameraman Neil Antin's stylish videography unifies the show with 'video-noir' lighting schemes. One speaker tells us of the anxieties of the Cold War while standing in what appears to be a property house specializing in neon signs. Dramatic musical selections from Vivaldi, Wagner and Stravinsky are used as atmospheric glue to tie disparate episodes together.

Writer-directors Clara and Robert Kuperberg only lose their footing near the end, when the show's various themes fail to come together. The docu wishes to recap Ellroy's excellent My Dark Places book in digest form, but the content just isn't there to dramatize Ellroy's change from hating his mother ("She was really just a whore') to accepting and loving her ("I learned the power of compassion"). The camera instead swoops over Los Angeles in search of spectacular aerial views to serve as wallpaper for Ellroy's mannered commentary. Ellroy's honesty is a lot like the testimony one of his characters might give. We keep asking ourselves why exactly he feels he must confess all these personal agonies.

Ellroy is fully aware that he's exploiting his tragic family history and he barely stops short of describing himself as a sick man. He need not apologize for his excellent books, as he's certainly a talented man. But after viewing James Ellroy: American Dog the fascinating writer of My Dark Places seems much less attractive. Ellroy and the Kuperberg show their awareness of this by placing a shot of Ellroy's dog Nikkle at the end of the show. Like Norman Bates speaking with the face of his dead mother, Nikkle 'speaks' with Ellroy's voice and warns the viewer that Ellroy is really a malicious exploiter and a terrible man. It's amusing, but the joke's on us.

Arte's DVD of James Ellroy: "American Dog" is an excellent presentation of a show with a beautiful look; the views of Los Angeles are a slick tour of a noir city. The audio is good and the music editorial excellent, with those classical pieces weaving in and out of Ellroy's edgy speeches. An extras menu leads to several interesting sidebar videos. Two dinner conversations with Ellroy and his friends (Rick Jackson, Bruce Wagner, Dana Delaney, Joe and Matthew Carnahan, Michelle Grace) at the Pacific Dining Car are followed by a 2005 reading of American Tabloid at the Hammer Museum by Ellroy, Bruce Wagner and Dana Delany. Ellroy is presented with the 'Jack Webb Award' by the LAPD, an honor that must have been a prelude to the film's interview with the oddly worshipful Chief Bratton. Galleries of vintage L.A. postcards, and gruesome crime scene photos finish the presentation.

For more information about James Ellroy: "American Dog", visit Facets Multi-Media. To order James Ellroy: "American Dog", go to TCM Shopping.

by Glenn Erickson
James Ellroy: American Dog - James Ellroy, Author Of L.a. Confidential, Is The Subject Of The Documentary, American Dog, On Dvd

James Ellroy: American Dog - James Ellroy, Author of L.A. Confidential, is the Subject of the Documentary, AMERICAN DOG, on DVD

The celebrated author of police stories and reigning expert on the 1940-1960 Los Angeles crime scene takes center stage in the eccentric and mannered James Ellroy: "American Dog", a glossy documentary that covers the same ground as Ellroy's autobiographical book My Dark Pages. Ellroy's life and career is a chronicle of obsessions that would give any film noir protagonist a run for his money. His mother was murdered when he was a child, an experience that, if the author is to be believed, determined the course of his life from that point onward. This documentary-essay puts James Ellroy front and center, and he's an overpowering character. As a speaker he's simultaneously very articulate and very profane, an uncomfortable combination. His descriptions of his childhood discovery of a sleazy underside to everyday life are peppered with words that are, depending on one's point of view, either frank and accurate or offensively aggressive. His disclosures about his own checkered past carry an intense charge of noir romanticism. Ellroy may not be bragging about his nefarious life as a homeless peeping tom, but he's not contrite, either. The show examines Ellroy's world and the mystique of Los Angeles as a place that beckons the ambitious and the foolhardy: "They come on vacation and leave on probation." Backward looks into history set up the twin homicides that formed Ellroy's young consciousness, the savage 1947 Black Dahlia killing and his own mother's murder in 1958. Somewhere along the line the subject of film noir enters. Ellroy partially linking it with his own work by saying that real detectives love the fantasy of Otto Preminger's Laura, wherein an investigator carries on a romance with a murder victim! James Ellroy: "American Dog" follows its subject to various crime scenes and allows him to address the camera directly, narrating his own inner thoughts or reciting relevant passages from My Dark Pages and other books. Other speakers comment on the author in interviews staged in appropriate locales. Los Angeles Police Chief and Ellroy fan William Bratton stands in uniform before a bank of flags and praises the effect of Ellroy's books on the image of the LAPD. Retired detective William Stoner sits at the bar in the Frolic Room on Hollywood Blvd. to explain how Ellroy hired him to investigate his mother's murder 37 years after the fact. Actress Dana Delany tells us that Ellroy used her real name as a character in one of his books, a murder story about depraved lowlifes. Ellroy discusses his work with author Bruce Wagner but is mostly on screen by himself, ambling through the courtyard of the American Cinematheque (formerly the Egyptian Theater) or loitering around atmospheric downtown street corners. With his distinctive walk and Hawaiian shirts, Ellroy seems born to the neon and dark alleys. Cameraman Neil Antin's stylish videography unifies the show with 'video-noir' lighting schemes. One speaker tells us of the anxieties of the Cold War while standing in what appears to be a property house specializing in neon signs. Dramatic musical selections from Vivaldi, Wagner and Stravinsky are used as atmospheric glue to tie disparate episodes together. Writer-directors Clara and Robert Kuperberg only lose their footing near the end, when the show's various themes fail to come together. The docu wishes to recap Ellroy's excellent My Dark Places book in digest form, but the content just isn't there to dramatize Ellroy's change from hating his mother ("She was really just a whore') to accepting and loving her ("I learned the power of compassion"). The camera instead swoops over Los Angeles in search of spectacular aerial views to serve as wallpaper for Ellroy's mannered commentary. Ellroy's honesty is a lot like the testimony one of his characters might give. We keep asking ourselves why exactly he feels he must confess all these personal agonies. Ellroy is fully aware that he's exploiting his tragic family history and he barely stops short of describing himself as a sick man. He need not apologize for his excellent books, as he's certainly a talented man. But after viewing James Ellroy: American Dog the fascinating writer of My Dark Places seems much less attractive. Ellroy and the Kuperberg show their awareness of this by placing a shot of Ellroy's dog Nikkle at the end of the show. Like Norman Bates speaking with the face of his dead mother, Nikkle 'speaks' with Ellroy's voice and warns the viewer that Ellroy is really a malicious exploiter and a terrible man. It's amusing, but the joke's on us. Arte's DVD of James Ellroy: "American Dog" is an excellent presentation of a show with a beautiful look; the views of Los Angeles are a slick tour of a noir city. The audio is good and the music editorial excellent, with those classical pieces weaving in and out of Ellroy's edgy speeches. An extras menu leads to several interesting sidebar videos. Two dinner conversations with Ellroy and his friends (Rick Jackson, Bruce Wagner, Dana Delaney, Joe and Matthew Carnahan, Michelle Grace) at the Pacific Dining Car are followed by a 2005 reading of American Tabloid at the Hammer Museum by Ellroy, Bruce Wagner and Dana Delany. Ellroy is presented with the 'Jack Webb Award' by the LAPD, an honor that must have been a prelude to the film's interview with the oddly worshipful Chief Bratton. Galleries of vintage L.A. postcards, and gruesome crime scene photos finish the presentation. For more information about James Ellroy: "American Dog", visit Facets Multi-Media. To order James Ellroy: "American Dog", go to TCM Shopping. by Glenn Erickson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 21, 2008

Released in United States on Video March 24, 2009

Project will be released theatrically in digital 3-D.

Released in United States on Video March 24, 2009

Released in United States Fall November 21, 2008

Christopher Sanders previously attached to direct.