3:10 to Yuma


1h 57m 2007

Brief Synopsis

A rancher struggles to support his ranch and family during a long drought. Desperately needing money to build a well, he takes an assignment to transport a notorious felon, in the hands of authorities, to Yuma for imprisonment. But, once the two meet, the criminal tries to tempt him with--in exchange for allowing him to escape--an offer of much more money than the rancher ever expected, the result of a hidden loot.

Film Details

Also Known As
El tren de las 3:10, Three Ten to Yuma
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Crime
Western
Adaptation
Release Date
2007
Distribution Company
Lionsgate
Location
Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA; Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 57m

Synopsis

A rancher struggles to support his ranch and family during a long drought. Desperately needing money to build a well, he takes an assignment to transport a notorious felon, in the hands of authorities, to Yuma for imprisonment. But, once the two meet, the criminal tries to tempt him with--in exchange for allowing him to escape--an offer of much more money than the rancher ever expected, the result of a hidden loot.

Crew

Gerardo Acosta

Caterer

Douglas Neal Acton

Medic

Todd L Adair

Driver

Pilar Agoyo

Tailor

Ada Akaji

Costumes

Todd Michael Amateau

Assistant Director

Aleah Ames

Set Costumer

Terry Anderson

Costume Designer

Brett Andrews

Props Assistant

Curtis A Andrews

Gaffer

Curtis A Andrews

Swing

Steve Apostolina

Voice Casting

David Ariniello

Grip

Bianca Arvin

Assistant

Lyle Atkins

Driver

Kirk Baily

Voice Casting

Barry Barclay

Production Coordinator

Adam Barth

Video Assist/Playback

David Barton

Props

Brian Battles

Visual Effects

David D. Baumann

Props Assistant

Jamie Baxter

Digital Effects Artist

Lisa Beach

Casting

Stuart Beattie

Other

Madeline Bell

Assistant Location Manager

Marco Beltrami

Original Music

Marco Beltrami

Music Conductor

Ron Berartie

Greensman

Mike Berdrow

Driver

Alan Berger

Driver

Greg Berry

Art Director

Tom Berto

Wrangler

Stuart Besser

Unit Production Manager

Stuart Besser

Executive Producer

David Betancourt

Foley Mixer

Steve Bissinger

Sound Effects Editor

Kevin Black

Set Production Assistant

Lou Boggs

Props

Marek Bojsza

Swing

Robert Bolanowski

Special Effects Technician

Ron Bolanowski

Special Effects Coordinator

Jo Edna Boldin

Casting

Mary Borg

Driver

Kirk Borland

Production Assistant

Bill Boston

Original Music

Charla Bowersox

Casting Associate

Kent Boyer

Driver

Kate Boyle

Assistant Director

Michael Brandt

Screenplay

Lindsay Brayden

Apprentice

Joseph Brennan

Boom Operator

Shawn J. Broes

Visual Effects Editor

Mark Brooks

Stunts

Brian Lee Brown

Stunts

George M. Brown

Driver

Wiiam P. Brown

Stunts

Donny Bruno

Props

Julie Bucek

Camera Trainee

Richard Bucher

Stunts

Justin Bull

Assistant

Darrell Burgess

Special Effects Foreman

Dorian Bustamante

3-D Artist

Doug Butts

Props

Chip Byrd

Camera Assistant

John Caglione Jr.

Makeup Artist

Steve Caldwell

Digital Effects Artist

Thomas Caldwell

Greensman

Christine Cantella

Assistant Costume Designer

Ted Caplan

Sound Effects Editor

Ted Caplan

Music Editor

Dixie J Capp

Associate Producer

Jon Caradies

Swing

Steven Carrillo

Driver

Gloria Casney

Hair Stylist

Michael Castellano

Set Costumer

Robert A. Castillo

Driver

Rafael Castro

Office Production Assistant

Nick Cessac

Accounting Assistant

Mary Chamberlain

Dailies

Debra Chapman

Tailor

Jeff Chassler

Swing

Lance Cheatham

Other

Pamela Ann Chizema

Post-Production Accountant

Debra Clair

Hair Stylist

Michael J. Clarke

Special Effects Technician

Marisa Clayton

Project Manager

Kenneth Coblentz

Grip

Malika R Cohen

Production Coordinator

Malika R Cohen

Assistant Production Coordinator

Simon Coke

Dialogue Editor

Adrian Colbert

Film Lab

Sage Emmett Connell

Gang Boss

Brenda Cook

Set Costumer

Peter Costelli

Assistant Location Manager

John Coven

Storyboard Artist

David Cowgill

Voice Casting

Cassandra Cox

Production Secretary

Wendy M Craig

Set Costumer

Lynda Crawford

Researcher

Tangi Crawford

Key Costumer

Lorraine Crossman

Set Costumer

Sara Cueva

Assistant Editor

Sara Cueva

Visual Effects Editor

Mick Cummings

Art Department

Scott Curtis

Foley Editor

Sam Dabbs

Digital Effects Artist

Jeff Dashnaw

Stunts

Bruno De Oliva

Assistant

Matt Debevec

Grip

Sean Devine

Dolly Grip

Sean Devine

Key Grip

Amit Dhawal

Digital Effects Artist

Ralph Diaz

Greensman

Judi Dickerson

Dialect Coach

Mark Dometrovich

Transportation

David Dorn

Set Production Assistant

Mark Dornfeld

Visual Effects Supervisor

Katie Douthit

Makeup Artist

Aaron Downing

Associate Producer

Aaron Downing

Post-Production Supervisor

Wendy Drapanas

Graphic Designer

Manny Dubon

Visual Effects

Steven S Duncan

Transportation Captain

Danny Edmo

Stunts

Charles Ehrlinger

Grip

John D Embry

Driver

Herman Endito

Stunts

Allen Esquibel

Driver

Jesse Esquibel

Driver

Bob Everett

Special Effects Technician

Chadney Everett

Gang Boss

Frank Eyers

Video Assist/Playback

Mike Fantasia

Location Manager

Kasra Farahani

Assistant Art Director

Rod Farley

Best Boy Grip

Kenny Farnell

Driver

Larry Fee

Driver

David Fencl

Props

Michele Ferrone

Visual Effects Producer

Joe Finley

Colorist

Dawn Fintor

Foley Artist

Richard Firkens

Driver

Richard Foreman

Photography

Chai Forest

Set Production Assistant

John W. Forester

Driver

Yvette Fortin

Production Assistant

Billy "butch" Frank

Driver

Elizabeth Gabel

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Rossano Galante

Original Music

Jane Galli

Makeup

Edgar Garcia

Caterer

Ramon Garcia

Key Grip

Scott Garcia

Special Effects Technician

Stan Garner

Other

Antonio Garrido

Dolly Grip

Susan Germaine

Hair Stylist

Cory Geryak

Gaffer

David Giammarco

Sound Mixer

Dale Gibson

Stunts

Troy Gilbert

Stunts

Daniel J. Gilooly

Greensman

Tim Gomillion

Sound

Joseph Gonzales

Driver

Jimmy Goodman

Driver

Thomas Goodrich

Other

Kathrine Gordon

Hair

Linda R Gore

On-Set Dresser

Christina Graff

Visual Effects Producer

Paul Graff

Visual Effects Supervisor

Kris Gregg

Film Lab

Peter Grendle

Art Department

Kurt Greufe

Accounting Assistant

Tad Griffith

Stunts

Isobel Griffiths

Music

Graham Griswold

On-Set Dresser

Lee Grubin

Editing

Nicholas Guest

Voice Casting

Derek Haas

Screenplay

Bob Hall

Camera Assistant

Rj Harbour

Digital Effects Artist

Matthew Harrison

Foley Editor

Jay R. Hart

Set Decorator

Steve Hassenpflug

Stunts

Nicholas Hasson

Cgi Artist

Oliver S Hendrickson

Stunts

Rusty Hendrickson

Animal Wrangler

Scout Schoenfeld Hendrickson

Stunts

Scout Schoenfeld Hendrickson

Production Assistant

Hank Herrera

Best Boy Grip

Hank Herrera

Grip

Freddie Hice

Stunt Coordinator

Freddie Hice

Unit Director

Mark Hitchler

Set Designer

Leonard E Hoffman

Rigging Electrician

Shaina Holmes

Digital Effects Artist

Ji Young Hong

Digital Effects Artist

Virginia Hopkins

Painter

Niki Hossack

Set Production Assistant

R. A. Hossie

Tailor

Katy Houska

Casting Associate

Film Details

Also Known As
El tren de las 3:10, Three Ten to Yuma
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Crime
Western
Adaptation
Release Date
2007
Distribution Company
Lionsgate
Location
Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA; Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 57m

Award Nominations

Best Score

2007

Best Sound Editing

2007

Articles

3:10 to Yuma - Russell Crowe & Christian Bale in the 2007 Remake of 3:10 TO YUMA on DVD


Major westerns have become so infrequent that every new sagebrush oater ignites a discussion about the state of the genre. The epic Dances with Wolves and Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven did exceedingly well, but the argument can be made that the western has been in decline since the end of the 1960s. 3:10 to Yuma is a big-budget remake of a 1957 Glenn Ford - Van Heflin gem directed by Delmer Daves. Its modest scale is now considered too small for a TV show, let alone a major release catering to an audience expecting serious western action -- shootouts, chases, jeopardy and violence. Witness the no-show box office of this year's revisionist outlaw tale The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford: it offers only a few scenes of muted, understated gunplay. In contrast, new trailers for 3:10 to Yuma remind us of The Magnificent Seven, with massed gun battles, a stagecoach wreck, execution murders, explosions -- the works. The remake is rousing entertainment, even if its only truly memorable component is Russell Crowe's sly performance.

Synopsis: Ben Wade (Russell Crowe) and his gang of thieves rob a stage and murder several guards outside the town of Bisbee, a crime witnessed by Dan Evans (Van Heflin) and his young sons. Passing through town to put the marshal on the wrong scent, Ben is captured when he stays behind to court young bartender Emmy Nelson (Vinessa Shaw). Desperate to keep his failing ranch, Dan takes the unenviable duty of escorting the prisoner to Contention, there to catch the train to the Yuma penitentiary. But Wade's gang has other ideas. If the outlaws catch up with Dan, he won't have a chance.

Instructions: Take one 1957 western, add color and Panavision. Enhance the original's standard stage holdup into a giant action set piece with a score of dead bodies, falling horses, a Gatling gun and a stage wreck. Give Dan a multi-layered back-story. Make him a handicapped war veteran with an older son who's ashamed of his old man for not defending his turf with a gun. Imply that Dan's wife (Gretchen Mol) also thinks he's a wimp, and has turned him out of her bed. Have Dan victimized by crooked businessmen that burn his barn as a means of seizing his farm to sell to the corporate railroad. Inflate the trip to Contention, transforming it into a perilous journey with fights against Indians and a shoot-out with treacherous miners (that oppress their Chinese laborers, for proper PC positioning). Add a dozen speaking roles to the story to provide targets for yet more superfluous action scenes.

Most of the old script by Halstead Welles remains in the remake, beneath the extra trimmings designed to update 3:10 to Yuma for modern audiences. Russell Crowe brings an amusing new interpretation to the character of Ben Wade. The outlaw shoots his own henchman without batting an eyelid, and then puts his own life in jeopardy to linger in Bisbee with the amorous Emmy. The best moment in the movie occurs when Dan's precociously capable son William (Logan Lerman) doubts that Wade is such a bad man. Wade tells the kid straight out that he certainly is a bad man, and that he's perfectly willing to kill anybody to effect his escape.

Along with the new action scenes come a fistful of added character complications. Young William Evans is now a junior gunslinger, turning the tale into a saga about passing on masculine values from father to son. This predictable subplot is actually a step backwards from late 50s films about older westerners mentoring younger guns on the responsibility of violence: The Lonely Man, The Tin Star. Those pictures taught that bravado and brute force were undesirable, while judgment and reserve could win the day. The new 3:10 to Yuma preaches that the most important thing is to maintain one's pride and keep fighting no matter what. If William decides that his father is a wuss because he won't go head-to-head with a dozen pro gunslingers, it's the father's problem, not the son's.

Western stories have weight when we perceive moral truths being revealed beneath the surface action. In Eastwood's Unforgiven the myth of glorious frontier justice is reduced to ignorant, drunken butchery. The new 3:10 to Yuma takes the wisdom of a great western like Ride the High Country and turns it on its ear. To confect an exciting twist ending, the final confrontation with Ben Wade's outlaw gang is warped into a multiple gun-down worthy of Sergio Leone. By that time 3:10 to Yuma has long abandoned its hold on the original's sense of drama. This is what it takes to fill theater seats these days.

As a production, the new 3:10 to Yuma is a beauty. The visuals feature eye-catching landscapes and the action scenes deliver the promised thrills and mayhem. Director Mangold avoids contemporary Chop Suey editing patterns, opting instead for a more staccato version of classic staging. In most scenes, we can actually see what's going on as it happens. We can identify who's being killed and who survives. It's an idea that just might catch on.

Russell Crowe's Ben Wade is also 'enhanced' by giving him a compulsion to make pencil sketches, This artistic impulse leads to a laughable scene where Ben sketches the nude Emmy more or less like Leonardo DiCaprio drew Kate Winslet in Titanic. What's next, a western where the dangerous killer shows his feminine side by knitting?

Christian Bale is suitably intense throughout. His Dan is so anxious to earn that $200 of blood money, we'd think his barren acres are caught in the subprime loan crisis. Somewhere on the trail Dan's motivation changes from economic necessity to that old stand-by: 'a man's gotta do what he's gotta do.' It may seem unfair to persist in comparing this remake to the B&W original, but the fact is that the added character complications have only made Dan Evans and Ben Wade less interesting.

Beyond thematic considerations, we wonder two things about the physical mechanics of 3:10 to Yuma. Dan Evans gets around very well for a man missing a foot. We even see him running at times. And the detective played by Peter Fonda should be nominated for Iron Man status. Shot in the stomach, Fonda returns to action only a few minutes later, galumphing along on a fast horse and showing only a hint of discomfort!

As expected, Lionsgate's DVD of 3:10 to Yuma is an excellent enhanced transfer of the handsomely photographed box office success. The packaging claims a 2.40:1 aspect ratio. The audio is crisp and the mixers have not tried to overwhelm us with monster sound effects, a very good choice. Action westerns are always fun, and Lionsgate's show delivers the goods.

The single disc presentation offers a full complement of extras. Director Mangold (Walk the Line) provides a friendly commentary. He starts by making the point that his film can be distinguished from other remakes in that the original is now too obscure to be a salable commodity on the basis of its title alone. He's open about reusing much of Halstead Welles' original script and updating the story for a modern audience. But he perceives the story in terms of an ordinary conflict between bravery and cowardice. If modern westerns seem dumber than ever, it's because they tend to revert to the genre's most simpleminded story elements.

David Naylor's attractive featurettes present the filmmakers discussing the show over behind the scenes footage, with an interesting emphasis on special effects mechanics. Another featurette uses input from academics to look at the historical basis for movies about Outlaws, Gangs and Posses, while An Epic Explored is a less focused item about the western genre's reflection of the culture at large.

A long list of deleted scenes (mostly bits of scenes) consists of extra dialogue, especially from the less prominent characters. Is it reasonable to expect an 'extended version' to surface, reinstating this footage? Although some of the snippets are interesting 3:10 to Yuma plays fine as it is.

For more information about 3:10 to Yuma, visit Lionsgate. To order 3:10 to Yuma, go to TCM Shopping.

by Glenn Erickson
3:10 To Yuma - Russell Crowe & Christian Bale In The 2007 Remake Of 3:10 To Yuma On Dvd

3:10 to Yuma - Russell Crowe & Christian Bale in the 2007 Remake of 3:10 TO YUMA on DVD

Major westerns have become so infrequent that every new sagebrush oater ignites a discussion about the state of the genre. The epic Dances with Wolves and Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven did exceedingly well, but the argument can be made that the western has been in decline since the end of the 1960s. 3:10 to Yuma is a big-budget remake of a 1957 Glenn Ford - Van Heflin gem directed by Delmer Daves. Its modest scale is now considered too small for a TV show, let alone a major release catering to an audience expecting serious western action -- shootouts, chases, jeopardy and violence. Witness the no-show box office of this year's revisionist outlaw tale The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford: it offers only a few scenes of muted, understated gunplay. In contrast, new trailers for 3:10 to Yuma remind us of The Magnificent Seven, with massed gun battles, a stagecoach wreck, execution murders, explosions -- the works. The remake is rousing entertainment, even if its only truly memorable component is Russell Crowe's sly performance. Synopsis: Ben Wade (Russell Crowe) and his gang of thieves rob a stage and murder several guards outside the town of Bisbee, a crime witnessed by Dan Evans (Van Heflin) and his young sons. Passing through town to put the marshal on the wrong scent, Ben is captured when he stays behind to court young bartender Emmy Nelson (Vinessa Shaw). Desperate to keep his failing ranch, Dan takes the unenviable duty of escorting the prisoner to Contention, there to catch the train to the Yuma penitentiary. But Wade's gang has other ideas. If the outlaws catch up with Dan, he won't have a chance. Instructions: Take one 1957 western, add color and Panavision. Enhance the original's standard stage holdup into a giant action set piece with a score of dead bodies, falling horses, a Gatling gun and a stage wreck. Give Dan a multi-layered back-story. Make him a handicapped war veteran with an older son who's ashamed of his old man for not defending his turf with a gun. Imply that Dan's wife (Gretchen Mol) also thinks he's a wimp, and has turned him out of her bed. Have Dan victimized by crooked businessmen that burn his barn as a means of seizing his farm to sell to the corporate railroad. Inflate the trip to Contention, transforming it into a perilous journey with fights against Indians and a shoot-out with treacherous miners (that oppress their Chinese laborers, for proper PC positioning). Add a dozen speaking roles to the story to provide targets for yet more superfluous action scenes. Most of the old script by Halstead Welles remains in the remake, beneath the extra trimmings designed to update 3:10 to Yuma for modern audiences. Russell Crowe brings an amusing new interpretation to the character of Ben Wade. The outlaw shoots his own henchman without batting an eyelid, and then puts his own life in jeopardy to linger in Bisbee with the amorous Emmy. The best moment in the movie occurs when Dan's precociously capable son William (Logan Lerman) doubts that Wade is such a bad man. Wade tells the kid straight out that he certainly is a bad man, and that he's perfectly willing to kill anybody to effect his escape. Along with the new action scenes come a fistful of added character complications. Young William Evans is now a junior gunslinger, turning the tale into a saga about passing on masculine values from father to son. This predictable subplot is actually a step backwards from late 50s films about older westerners mentoring younger guns on the responsibility of violence: The Lonely Man, The Tin Star. Those pictures taught that bravado and brute force were undesirable, while judgment and reserve could win the day. The new 3:10 to Yuma preaches that the most important thing is to maintain one's pride and keep fighting no matter what. If William decides that his father is a wuss because he won't go head-to-head with a dozen pro gunslingers, it's the father's problem, not the son's. Western stories have weight when we perceive moral truths being revealed beneath the surface action. In Eastwood's Unforgiven the myth of glorious frontier justice is reduced to ignorant, drunken butchery. The new 3:10 to Yuma takes the wisdom of a great western like Ride the High Country and turns it on its ear. To confect an exciting twist ending, the final confrontation with Ben Wade's outlaw gang is warped into a multiple gun-down worthy of Sergio Leone. By that time 3:10 to Yuma has long abandoned its hold on the original's sense of drama. This is what it takes to fill theater seats these days. As a production, the new 3:10 to Yuma is a beauty. The visuals feature eye-catching landscapes and the action scenes deliver the promised thrills and mayhem. Director Mangold avoids contemporary Chop Suey editing patterns, opting instead for a more staccato version of classic staging. In most scenes, we can actually see what's going on as it happens. We can identify who's being killed and who survives. It's an idea that just might catch on. Russell Crowe's Ben Wade is also 'enhanced' by giving him a compulsion to make pencil sketches, This artistic impulse leads to a laughable scene where Ben sketches the nude Emmy more or less like Leonardo DiCaprio drew Kate Winslet in Titanic. What's next, a western where the dangerous killer shows his feminine side by knitting? Christian Bale is suitably intense throughout. His Dan is so anxious to earn that $200 of blood money, we'd think his barren acres are caught in the subprime loan crisis. Somewhere on the trail Dan's motivation changes from economic necessity to that old stand-by: 'a man's gotta do what he's gotta do.' It may seem unfair to persist in comparing this remake to the B&W original, but the fact is that the added character complications have only made Dan Evans and Ben Wade less interesting. Beyond thematic considerations, we wonder two things about the physical mechanics of 3:10 to Yuma. Dan Evans gets around very well for a man missing a foot. We even see him running at times. And the detective played by Peter Fonda should be nominated for Iron Man status. Shot in the stomach, Fonda returns to action only a few minutes later, galumphing along on a fast horse and showing only a hint of discomfort! As expected, Lionsgate's DVD of 3:10 to Yuma is an excellent enhanced transfer of the handsomely photographed box office success. The packaging claims a 2.40:1 aspect ratio. The audio is crisp and the mixers have not tried to overwhelm us with monster sound effects, a very good choice. Action westerns are always fun, and Lionsgate's show delivers the goods. The single disc presentation offers a full complement of extras. Director Mangold (Walk the Line) provides a friendly commentary. He starts by making the point that his film can be distinguished from other remakes in that the original is now too obscure to be a salable commodity on the basis of its title alone. He's open about reusing much of Halstead Welles' original script and updating the story for a modern audience. But he perceives the story in terms of an ordinary conflict between bravery and cowardice. If modern westerns seem dumber than ever, it's because they tend to revert to the genre's most simpleminded story elements. David Naylor's attractive featurettes present the filmmakers discussing the show over behind the scenes footage, with an interesting emphasis on special effects mechanics. Another featurette uses input from academics to look at the historical basis for movies about Outlaws, Gangs and Posses, while An Epic Explored is a less focused item about the western genre's reflection of the culture at large. A long list of deleted scenes (mostly bits of scenes) consists of extra dialogue, especially from the less prominent characters. Is it reasonable to expect an 'extended version' to surface, reinstating this footage? Although some of the snippets are interesting 3:10 to Yuma plays fine as it is. For more information about 3:10 to Yuma, visit Lionsgate. To order 3:10 to Yuma, go to TCM Shopping. by Glenn Erickson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 7, 2007

Released in United States on Video January 8, 2008

Remake of Columbia Pictures' feature "3:10 to Yuma" (USA/1957) directed by Delmer Daves and starring Glenn Ford; based on the short story "Three Ten to Yuma" by Elmore Leonard and published by Dime Western Magazine March, 1953.

Mangold used the 1957 Western as a touchstone for his film "Cop Land" (US/1997).

Literary Sale Date: 06/19/2003.

Previously in development at Columbia Pictures.

Released in United States Fall September 7, 2007

Released in United States on Video January 8, 2008

Project was included on the 2006 Black List.