Espionage


1h 7m 1937
Espionage

Brief Synopsis

Rival reporters fight off spies while vying to interview a munitions tycoon.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Adventure
Adaptation
Release Date
Feb 26, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Espionage by Walter Hackett (London, 15 Oct 1935).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 7m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Synopsis

When informant La Forge goes to rival Paris news bureaus to report that arms dealer Anton Kronsky is leaving Paris by train that night, bureau chief Alfred Hartrix can't send star reporter Patricia Booth because her passport has been revoked. She steals his passport, though, because it has an unrecognizable photo of him and his wife Sarah on it, then tricks Simmons, another reporter, into giving her the assignment. Meanwhile, rival bureau chief Doyle assigns famous novelist Kenneth Stevens to the story because his star reporter, Bill Cordell, wants to spend time in Paris with a new girl. On the train, after Kenneth's passport is stolen by a pickpocket and he rescues Pat from a man who tries to make a pass at her, he decides to be the "husband" on her passport. Not knowing his real identity and not revealing her own, Pat reluctantly agrees. That evening, after a shot narrowly misses Kronsky in the dining car, Kenneth wangles an invitation to Kronsky's private car by critiquing a composition Kronsky wrote for the violin, but is still unabale to find out where Kronsky and his companion Fleurette are headed. Later, Jimmy Brown, a laundry-owner from St. Louis, is found by Kenneth and Pat searching her compartment, but Brown's apparent drunkenness is accepted by them as an explanation. After Kenneth sneaks out of Pat's compartment, he is hit on the head and thrown into Kronsky's private car, then wakes up after Kronsky's aide throws a suitcase with a bomb in it out of the window. Kronsky holds Kenneth as well as Pat, thinking they are assassins, but Pat helps Kenneth to escape, then is let go by the Lucerne police the next day. After she leaves the station, it is revealed that the policeman as well as Brown work for Kronsky, and that Brown will follow Pat, hoping to locate Kenneth. In a pre-arranged meeting that afternoon, Kenneth approaches her in disguise, but, when she sees Brown, they pretend not to know each other. She then changes into a Swiss peasant costume while Brown approaches Kenneth, not knowing his identity, and asks him to follow Pat. At the cafe where Kenneth and Pat have agreed to meet, Brown and Maxie Burgos, a Russian passenger from the train, also arrive. As Brown tries to recruit Burgos to work for Kronsky, Pat and Kenneth conclude that Brown is the assassin. Then Kenneth, still in disguise, tells Brown that Pat is headed for Kronsky's villa, so Brown takes Burgos there, followed by Pat and Kenneth. Arriving at the villa, Brown sees a revolver in Burgos' pocket and secretly takes it before entering the house. Kenneth then gains entrance to the house by pretending to be a policeman who has captured Pat. They then overhear some men talking on the telephone ordering the end of production of all war materiels "on Kronsky's orders." It is finally revealed that Kronsky came to Brissac to marry Fleurette, who is really a Russian noblewoman who refused to marry him unless he stopped manufacturing arms. It is also revealed that Burgos is the real assassin. While Kenneth and Pat attempt to call their bureaus, they discover that Kronsky has released the information to the press himself. Pat and Kenneth also learn each other's real identities and, although they are arrested by Swiss police, their "crime" turns out to be a minor traffic violation involving a tandem and they are happily released after paying a five franc fine.

Cast

Edmund Lowe

Kenneth [Stevens, also known as Alfred Hartrix]

Madge Evans

Patricia [Booth, also known as Sarah Hartrix]

Paul Lukas

[Anton] Kronsky

Ketti Gallian

Sonia

Skeets Gallagher

[Jimmy] Brown

Frank Reicher

Van Cram

William Gilbert

Turk

Robert Graves

Duval

Leonid Kinsky

[Maxie] Burgos

Mitchell Lewis

Sondheim

Charles Trowbridge

Doyle

Barnett Parker

[Bill] Cordell

Nita Pike

Fleurette

Juan Torena

South American

George Sorel

Maitre d'hotel

Gaston Glass

La Forge

Egon Brecher

Chief of police

Russell Hicks

Alfred Hartrix

Charles Williams

Simmons

Ann Rutherford

Girl in dining car

Max Lucke

Foreign civilian

Michael S. Visaroff

Foreign spy

Carlos J. De Valdez

Foreign officer

Guy D'ennery

Foreign man

Gordon De Main

Foreign man

Gennaro Curci

Foreign man

Ramsey Hill

Foreign man

Albert Pollet

French waiter

Lita Chevret

French secretary

Jacques Vanaire

French inspector

Andre Cheron

French inspector

Christian J. Frank

French guard

Fred W. Malatesta

French pickpocket

Jacques Lory

French pickpocket

Eugene Beday

French gateman

Carrie Daumery

French flower woman

Paul Weigel

French telegraph man

Leo White

Barber

Gino Corrado

Musician

Francesco Maran

Train guard

Eugene Borden

Doctor

Sven Borg

Masseuse

William Von Brincken

Legation officer

Jean Perry

Waiter

Robert Du Couedic

Waiter

Albert Morin

Waiter

Betty Blythe

Passenger

Genaro Spagnoli

Porter

Otto Fries

Driver

George Davis

Bartender

Herbert Corthell

Police judge

Barbara Leonard

German telephone operator

Torben Meyer

Police inspector

Enrico Ricardi

Whistling bit

Walter Bonn

Jack Chefe

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Adventure
Adaptation
Release Date
Feb 26, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Espionage by Walter Hackett (London, 15 Oct 1935).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 7m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to contemporary news items in Hollywood Reporter, Charles Clarke replaced Ray June as the cameraman in late January 1937 due to June's illness, and Edmund Lowe took over the role of Kenneth, originally intended for William Powell.