There Will Be Blood


2h 38m 2007
There Will Be Blood

Brief Synopsis

In turn-of-the-century California, a prospector transforms himself into an oil tycoon and drifts into corruption the more successful he becomes.

Film Details

Also Known As
Az poleje sie krew, A? na krev, Cierna krv, Haverá Sangue, Il petroliere, Kan Dökülecek, Oil, Petroleo sangriento, Sangue Negro, There Will Be Bl ood, Va curge sange, Vérzó olaj, petroliere
Genre
Drama
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
2007
Distribution Company
Paramount Vantage
Location
Marfa, Texas, USA; Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 38m

Synopsis

On the frontier of California's turn-of-the-century petroleum boom, Daniel Plainview transforms himself from a down-and-out silver miner raising a son on his own into a self-made oil tycoon. When Plainview gets a mysterious tip-off that there's a little town out West where an ocean of oil is oozing out of the ground, he heads with his son, H.W., to take their chances in dust-worn Little Boston. In this hardscrabble town, where the main excitement centers around the holy roller church of charismatic preacher Eli Sunday, Plainview and H.W. make their lucky strike. But even as the well raises all of their fortunes, nothing will remain the same as conflicts escalate and every human value--love, hope, community, belief, ambition and even the bond between father and son--is imperiled by corruption, deception and the flow of oil.

Crew

Oscar Acosta

Driver

Kimberly Adams-galligan

Assistant Costume Designer

Topaz Adizes

Set Production Assistant

Tom Ajar

Projectionist

Keith Alexander

Props

Brad Allen

Grip

Sally Allen

Casting

Steven Allen

Props

E Gloria Alvarado

Production Accountant

Colin Anderson

Camera Operator

Colin Anderson

Steadicam Operator

Mark Anderson

Transportation Co-Captain

Paul Thomas Anderson

Producer

Paul Thomas Anderson

Screenplay

Jon Applebaum

Office Production Assistant

Marcela Arevalo

Production Assistant

Jim Austin

Sound Engineer

Brian Edward Avery

Stunt Performer

Kim Ayers

Makeup Artist

Michael Babcock

Sound Supervisor

Justin Babin

Grip

Richard +frog+ Bain

Props

Lori A Balton

Location Scout

Skip Barbay

Driver

Craig R Baron

Props

Christopher Barron

Sound

Robert Baumgartner

Chief Lighting Technician

Kenny Becker

Color Timer

Kristan Berona

Casting

Megan Bertrang

Production Assistant

John Blake

Makeup

Bradley Blei

On-Set Dresser

David Blitstein

Special Effects Foreman

Andrew Bock

Sound

Glen Bohls

Construction

Mark "finn" Borg

Welder

Lewis Bowen

Painter

Richard J Boyle

Rigging Grip

Jimmie Bradford

Driver

Mark Bridges

Costume Designer

David Bringas

Props

Toni Cobb Brock

Casting Director

Toni Cobb Brock

Casting

Robert Brown

Props

Roy Burger

Animal Wrangler

Ryan Bust

Greensman

Robert Caballero

Medic

Marco Campos

Props

John Campuzano

Titles And Opticals

Rick Canelli

Adr

Bridget Cardenas

Painter

Joy Carmeci

Visual Effects Producer

Raul Carrera

Greensman

Mark Casey

Digital Effects Artist

Michael P Casey

On-Set Dresser

John F Cassidy

Rigging Grip

Kenneth Catando

Transportation Captain

John G Chalfant

Cgi Artist

Mack Chapman

Driver

Austin Christensen

Production Assistant

S Todd Christensen

Location Manager

Curtis E Clark

Transportation Captain

Dirk Clark

Props

Eden Clark-coblenz

Costume Supervisor

Grady Cofer

Visual Effects Supervisor

Linda Cohen

Music Supervisor

Kevin Collins

Set Production Assistant

Jack Colmenero

On-Set Dresser

Catherine Conrad

Makeup Artist

Joel Corry

Apprentice

John Countryman

Sound

Ronald C Cox

Props

David Crank

Art Director

Steve Cremin

Special Effects Coordinator

Charles Crivier

Grip

Chris Crivier

Best Boy Grip

Demelza Cronin

Assistant Production Coordinator

Jose Cruz

Craft Service

Eric Cunningham

Electrician

Laurence B Davis

Props

Ruth De Jong

Production Assistant

Galo Diaz De Tuesta

Driver

Gil Dean

Animal Wrangler

Jeff Debell

Greensman

James C Degeeter

Rigging Grip

Lupe Devine

Hair Stylist

Amit Dhawal

Digital Effects Artist

Joseph Dianda

Key Grip

Patricia Dillon

On-Set Dresser

Wes Dixon

Electrician

Kelly Doran

Sound

Derek M Drewes

Propman

Francois Duhamel

Photography

Ed Dunkley

Video

Coya Elliot

Assistant Sound Editor

Robert Elswit

Director Of Photography

Sharon Ely

Hair Stylist

Jim Erickson

Set Decorator

Christian F Eubank

Special Effects Technician

Renata Eubank

Production Assistant

Jerry Farrell

Props

Tony Farrell

Props

Gregory Faucett

Transportation Coordinator

Emily Fenster

Visual Effects Producer

Jack Fisk

Production Designer

Joe Fisk

Craft Service

Adam Flores

Grip

Christopher Flournoy

Props

Linda Flowers

Hair

Eli Fowler

Office Production Assistant

Jamie Franta

Grip

Erica Frauman

Post-Production Supervisor

Wayne French

Transportation Captain

Neil Gahm

Props

Elizabeth Galindo

Apprentice

Keith Gallina

Medic

Gustavo Garcia

Driver

Joey Garibay

Craft Service

Stan Garner

Coordinator

Franco Georgianna

Props

Keith Giller

On-Set Dresser

Mike Gillespie

Craft Service

Sandy P Gilzow

Key Rigging Grip

Christian Gonzalez

Craft Service

Oscar Gonzalez

Craft Service

David Goodin

Accounting Assistant

Melinda Sue Gordon

Photography

Christina Graff

Visual Effects Producer

Kurt Johann Graff

Visual Effects

Paul Graff

Visual Effects Supervisor

Jonathan Greber

Sound

Susan Greenhow

Visual Effects Producer

Jonny Greenwood

Original Music

Ginger Griffice

Assistant

Sarah Grossmann

Compositing Supervisor

J R Grubbs

Sound Effects Editor

Billy Guerro

Painter

Sara Guistini

Production Assistant

Jeff Habberstad

Stunt Coordinator

Mark Hanks

On-Set Dresser

Ryan Happy

Stunt Performer

Robin Harlan

Foley Artist

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

Claire Hassig

Scenic Artist

Cody Haynes

Animal Wrangler

Kenneth Heimer

Props

Jourdan Henderson

Art Department Coordinator

Eric Henshaw

Greensman

Orlando Hernandez

Electrician

Pablo C Herrera

Craft Service

Rick Hicks

Coordinator

Clint Higginbotham

Props

Ryan Hintz

Accountant

Elizabeth Hirsch

Visual Effects

Amy Hoffecker

Electrician

Allan Holder

Props

Bill Holmquist

Construction Coordinator

David Holt

Driver

Brad Holtzman

Set Costumer

Michael Honrada

Digital Effects Artist

David Horton

Foley Editor

Kenny Howard

Other

David Hunter

Visual Effects Editor

Steven Husch

Assistant Property Master

Barry Idoine

Camera Assistant

Dean F Janik

Painter

Dominique Jaramillo

Medic

Nate Johnson

Electrician

Tom Johnson

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Keii Johnston

Stunt Performer

Lewis Jones

Music Engineer

Ronnie Jordan

Driver

Mike Justus

Stunt Performer

Sean Kaczmarek

Cashier

Donna Kelley

Driver

Michael Kelly

Electrician

Nathan Kelly

Assistant

Steven J. Kerlagon

Painter

Sam Khorshid

3-D Artist

Kathleen Kiatta

Key Costumer

Jerry Kilber

Props

Curtis King

Rigging Electrician

Jay B King

Stunt Performer

Jay B King

Special Effects Technician

Richard King

Sound

Garry Kirks

Props

Jim Krase

Props

Joshua Krilov

Production Assistant

Cassandra Kulukundis

Casting Director

Jeffrey S Kunkel

Dolly Grip

Christian Labarta

Set Production Assistant

Andree Lago

Scenic Artist

Thom Lairson

Camera Assistant

Peter Lakoff

On-Set Dresser

Amy Lamendola

Production Assistant

Mike Lane

Sound

Shawn Lane

Stunt Performer

Ladd Lanford

Visual Effects Producer

Vanessa Lapato

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Laurel Lary

Set Production Assistant

Film Details

Also Known As
Az poleje sie krew, A? na krev, Cierna krv, Haverá Sangue, Il petroliere, Kan Dökülecek, Oil, Petroleo sangriento, Sangue Negro, There Will Be Bl ood, Va curge sange, Vérzó olaj, petroliere
Genre
Drama
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
2007
Distribution Company
Paramount Vantage
Location
Marfa, Texas, USA; Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 38m

Award Wins

Best Actor

2007

Best Actor

2008
Daniel Day-Lewis

Best Cinematography

2007
Robert Elswit

Best Cinematography

2007

Award Nominations

Best Adapted Screenplay

2007

Set Decoration

2007

Best Director

2007
Paul Thomas Anderson

Best Editing

2007

Best Picture

2007

Best Sound

2007

Articles

There Will Be Blood


The fifth film by Paul Thomas Anderson reworks the American entrepreneurial success story as a frontier myth turned robber baron drama. It's loosely based on Upton Sinclair's novel Oil!, though Anderson focuses solely on the first section of the novel ("the first 150 pages," he told interviewers). Sinclair's oil tycoon James Arnold Ross is renamed Daniel Plainview for the film and the drama turns on his relationship with an adopted son and his struggle with evangelical preacher Eli Watkins (Eli Sunday in the film).

Anderson's film begins with Plainview as a driven, solitary prospector attempting to dig his way to the American dream by mining for gold when he ends up with a gusher. He reinvents himself, transforming from simple prospector to self-made oil man, and becomes brutally competitive as success breeds greed for power and control. He finds his nemesis in a self-aggrandizing young preacher who builds his church on Plainview's money.

Anderson began researching his topic to fill out the portrait of Plainview and the American oil industry at the turn of the 20th century. Sinclair based his oilman on real-life tycoon Edward Doheny and Anderson absorbed The Dark Side of Fortune, a biography of Doheny written by Margaret Leslie Davis. He also visited museums dedicated to the early days of petroleum and studied photographs of wildcatting and drilling of the era, and he watched John Huston's The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) repeatedly.

Daniel Day-Lewis signed on after reading an early draft of the script. "I'd loved [Anderson's] films," he explained in a 2008 interview. "And the idea had occurred to me that we might enjoy getting up to the same kind of mischief, but when this script came it really took me quite by surprise in the most wonderful way. The bag was packed once I'd read it." Actually, it was a couple of years before the funding came through, and Day-Lewis -- who is legendary for his meticulous preparation for his roles - spent the time doing his own research. He studied the life of Doheny, read letters from men working the California oil fields in the early 20th century, and learned to work with the tools of the trade. And, prompted by Anderson, he also watched The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. Coincidentally, the measured baritone rumble of the voice Day-Lewis adopted for the character evokes John Huston, which is fitting as his story suggests the early days of Noah Cross, the character Huston plays in Roman Polanski's Chinatown. "A few people have asked me if I modeled the voice on John Huston," he remarked in another interview. "I didn't. But I did listen to some tapes of Huston's voice, among others. And there was something about the vigor of Huston's language that appealed to me." And he burrowed into the darkness of his character. "We all have murderous thoughts throughout the day, if not the week. We all live under some repression; we have to, it's part of the deal. And what is more invigorating than to unleash some of that stuff?"

Kel O'Neill was originally cast as Eli Sunday, the ambitious, scheming young pastor whose oil-rich land is leased by Plainview, but the part was recast after a few weeks of shooting. Paul Dano, who had previously worked with Day-Lewis in the film Jack and Rose (2005) and was already cast as Eli's meek brother, was offered the role of Eli while production was underway. He jumped into the character with only four days to prepare, supported by Day-Lewis, and the siblings were transformed into identical twins with Dano playing scenes opposite himself.

Unable to find suitable locations that evoked "what Bakersfield would have looked like before the discovery of oil" in his home state of California, Anderson took the company to West Texas and built his turn-of-the-century California town of Little Boston and constructed the oil fields of his film on a ranch outside of Marfa, the same town where the 1956 classic Giant was shot. In collaboration with his regular director of photography Robert Elswit, Anderson stripped the frame down to stark, spare images with isolated figures and skeletal oil derricks on endless plains against a pale sky. It's a very different style than the colorful, energetic business of his sprawling ensemble films Boogie Nights (1997) and Magnolia (1999).

For the soundtrack he turned to Jonny Greenwood, the guitarist of Radiohead. He had never before scored a film and approached the project without any preconceptions. Only a few sections were written for specific scenes, he explained in a 2007 interview. "I tried to write to the scenery, and the story rather than specific "themes" for characters. It's not really the kind of narrative that would suit that. It was all about the underlying menace in the film, the greed, and that against the... oppressive religious mood...." Initially apprehensive at the haunting music Greenwood presented him, it grew on Anderson as he continued listening to it and became a defining element to the film's distinctive mood. Greenwood has since written the music for every subsequent Anderson film.

Between the release of his previous feature, Punch-Drunk Love (2002), and pre-production on There Will Be Blood, Anderson served as back-up director for the aging Robert Altman on A Prairie Home Companion (2006). Altman had been a powerful influence on Anderson's films and over the course of the production they became friends. Altman passed away while Anderson was editing the film in Ireland. In tribute to his friend and mentor, Anderson dedicated the film to him.

There Will Be Blood won Academy Awards for Daniel Day-Lewis (his second Oscar for Best Actor) and cinematographer Robert Elswit and six additional nominations, including nods for Anderson for his screenplay and direction and for Best Picture (it went to No Country for Old Men). A decade later, Anderson and Day-Lewis reunited for the film Phantom Thread.

by Sean Axmaker


Sources:
"Daniel Day-Lewis: Interview," Dave Calhoun. Time Out: London, February, 2008.
"IndieWire Profile: "There Will Be Blood" director Paul Thomas Anderson," Eugene Hernandez. IndieWire, December 27, 2007.
"The Enigma of Day-Lewis," Peter Stanford. The Observer, January 13, 2008.
December 21, 2007 episode of Charlie Rose with Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis, PBS.
Reel Pieces interview with Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Thomas Anderson by Anette Insdorf at 92nd Street Y, December 12, 2007.
"An Interview with Jonny Greenwood." Nonesuch, December 6, 2007.
IMDb

There Will Be Blood

There Will Be Blood

The fifth film by Paul Thomas Anderson reworks the American entrepreneurial success story as a frontier myth turned robber baron drama. It's loosely based on Upton Sinclair's novel Oil!, though Anderson focuses solely on the first section of the novel ("the first 150 pages," he told interviewers). Sinclair's oil tycoon James Arnold Ross is renamed Daniel Plainview for the film and the drama turns on his relationship with an adopted son and his struggle with evangelical preacher Eli Watkins (Eli Sunday in the film). Anderson's film begins with Plainview as a driven, solitary prospector attempting to dig his way to the American dream by mining for gold when he ends up with a gusher. He reinvents himself, transforming from simple prospector to self-made oil man, and becomes brutally competitive as success breeds greed for power and control. He finds his nemesis in a self-aggrandizing young preacher who builds his church on Plainview's money. Anderson began researching his topic to fill out the portrait of Plainview and the American oil industry at the turn of the 20th century. Sinclair based his oilman on real-life tycoon Edward Doheny and Anderson absorbed The Dark Side of Fortune, a biography of Doheny written by Margaret Leslie Davis. He also visited museums dedicated to the early days of petroleum and studied photographs of wildcatting and drilling of the era, and he watched John Huston's The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) repeatedly. Daniel Day-Lewis signed on after reading an early draft of the script. "I'd loved [Anderson's] films," he explained in a 2008 interview. "And the idea had occurred to me that we might enjoy getting up to the same kind of mischief, but when this script came it really took me quite by surprise in the most wonderful way. The bag was packed once I'd read it." Actually, it was a couple of years before the funding came through, and Day-Lewis -- who is legendary for his meticulous preparation for his roles - spent the time doing his own research. He studied the life of Doheny, read letters from men working the California oil fields in the early 20th century, and learned to work with the tools of the trade. And, prompted by Anderson, he also watched The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. Coincidentally, the measured baritone rumble of the voice Day-Lewis adopted for the character evokes John Huston, which is fitting as his story suggests the early days of Noah Cross, the character Huston plays in Roman Polanski's Chinatown. "A few people have asked me if I modeled the voice on John Huston," he remarked in another interview. "I didn't. But I did listen to some tapes of Huston's voice, among others. And there was something about the vigor of Huston's language that appealed to me." And he burrowed into the darkness of his character. "We all have murderous thoughts throughout the day, if not the week. We all live under some repression; we have to, it's part of the deal. And what is more invigorating than to unleash some of that stuff?" Kel O'Neill was originally cast as Eli Sunday, the ambitious, scheming young pastor whose oil-rich land is leased by Plainview, but the part was recast after a few weeks of shooting. Paul Dano, who had previously worked with Day-Lewis in the film Jack and Rose (2005) and was already cast as Eli's meek brother, was offered the role of Eli while production was underway. He jumped into the character with only four days to prepare, supported by Day-Lewis, and the siblings were transformed into identical twins with Dano playing scenes opposite himself. Unable to find suitable locations that evoked "what Bakersfield would have looked like before the discovery of oil" in his home state of California, Anderson took the company to West Texas and built his turn-of-the-century California town of Little Boston and constructed the oil fields of his film on a ranch outside of Marfa, the same town where the 1956 classic Giant was shot. In collaboration with his regular director of photography Robert Elswit, Anderson stripped the frame down to stark, spare images with isolated figures and skeletal oil derricks on endless plains against a pale sky. It's a very different style than the colorful, energetic business of his sprawling ensemble films Boogie Nights (1997) and Magnolia (1999). For the soundtrack he turned to Jonny Greenwood, the guitarist of Radiohead. He had never before scored a film and approached the project without any preconceptions. Only a few sections were written for specific scenes, he explained in a 2007 interview. "I tried to write to the scenery, and the story rather than specific "themes" for characters. It's not really the kind of narrative that would suit that. It was all about the underlying menace in the film, the greed, and that against the... oppressive religious mood...." Initially apprehensive at the haunting music Greenwood presented him, it grew on Anderson as he continued listening to it and became a defining element to the film's distinctive mood. Greenwood has since written the music for every subsequent Anderson film. Between the release of his previous feature, Punch-Drunk Love (2002), and pre-production on There Will Be Blood, Anderson served as back-up director for the aging Robert Altman on A Prairie Home Companion (2006). Altman had been a powerful influence on Anderson's films and over the course of the production they became friends. Altman passed away while Anderson was editing the film in Ireland. In tribute to his friend and mentor, Anderson dedicated the film to him. There Will Be Blood won Academy Awards for Daniel Day-Lewis (his second Oscar for Best Actor) and cinematographer Robert Elswit and six additional nominations, including nods for Anderson for his screenplay and direction and for Best Picture (it went to No Country for Old Men). A decade later, Anderson and Day-Lewis reunited for the film Phantom Thread. by Sean Axmaker Sources: "Daniel Day-Lewis: Interview," Dave Calhoun. Time Out: London, February, 2008. "IndieWire Profile: "There Will Be Blood" director Paul Thomas Anderson," Eugene Hernandez. IndieWire, December 27, 2007. "The Enigma of Day-Lewis," Peter Stanford. The Observer, January 13, 2008. December 21, 2007 episode of Charlie Rose with Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis, PBS. Reel Pieces interview with Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Thomas Anderson by Anette Insdorf at 92nd Street Y, December 12, 2007. "An Interview with Jonny Greenwood." Nonesuch, December 6, 2007. IMDb

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Voted one of the 10 best films of 2007 by the American Film Institute (AFI).

Winner of four 2007 awards including Best Film, Best Actor (Daniel Day-Lewis), Best Director and Best Cinematography by the National Society of Film Critics (NSFC).

Winner of four 2007 awards including Best Picture of the Year, Best Director, Best Actor (Daniel Day-Lewis) and Best Production Design by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association (LAFCA).

Winner of the 2007 award for Best Actor (Daniel Day-Lewis) by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA).

Winner of the 2007 award for Best Actor (Daniel Day-Lewis) by the Chicago Film Critics Association (CFCA).

Winner of the 2007 award for Best Actor (Daniel Day-Lewis) by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG).

Winner of the 2007 award for Excellence In Production Design For A Period Feature Film by the Art Directors Guild (ADG).

Winner of the 2007 award for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography by the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC).

Winner of two 2007 awards including Actor of the Year (Daniel Day-Lewis) and Director of the Year by the London Critics' Circle.

Winner of two 2007 awards including Best Cinematographer and Best Actor (Daniel Day-Lewis) by the New York Film Critics Circle (NYFCC).

Released in United States Winter December 26, 2007

Released in United States on Video April 8, 2008

Released in United States February 2008

Released in United States September 2008

Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (Competition) February 7-17, 2008.

Shown at San Sebastian International Film Festival (FIPRESCI Grand Prix) September 18-27, 2008.

Loosley based on the novel "Oil!" written by Upton Sinclair published by Albert & Charles Boni 1927.

Project was included on the 2006 Black List.

Released in United States Winter December 26, 2007 (NY, LA)

Released in United States on Video April 8, 2008

Released in United States February 2008 (Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (Competition) February 7-17, 2008.)

Released in United States September 2008 (Shown at San Sebastian International Film Festival (FIPRESCI Grand Prix) September 18-27, 2008.)

Winner of two awards including the Silver Bear for Best Director and the Silver Bear for Outstanding Artistic Contribution in Music at the 2008 Berlin International Film Festival.