No Country for Old Men


2h 2m 2007
No Country for Old Men

Brief Synopsis

A poacher has to elude the Texas Rangers and the mob after stealing drug money.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Adventure
Black Comedy
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Western
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
2007
Production Company
Cole Gittinger
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX
Location
Marfa, Texas, USA; Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 2m

Synopsis

Llewelyn Moss finds a pickup truck surrounded by a sentry of dead men. A load of heroin and two million dollars in cash are still in the back trunk. When Moss takes the money, he sets off a chain reaction of catastrophic violence that not even the law--namely aging, disillusioned Sheriff Bell--can contain. Moss tries to evade his pursuers, in particular a mysterious mastermind who flips coins for human lives.

Crew

Philip Abeyta

Rigging Electrician

Douglas Neal Acton

Medic

Robert Adams

Digital Effects Artist

Janine Aines

Animal Trainer

Ron Alexus

Chief Lighting Technician

Phil Allard

Rigging Electrician

Angel H Alvarado Jr.

Song Performer

Chris M Alvarez

Welder

Aleah Ames

Key Costumer

Bill Anagnos

Stunts

J. Todd Anderson

Consultant

Danny Andres

Rigging Grip

Sage Asteak

Set Production Assistant

Ulli Auer-erdoes

Painter

Christopher Lee Bailey

Stunts

Liza Bambenek

Camera Assistant

Tom Bango

Camera Assistant

Pedro Barquin

Greensman

Jim Barth

Foreman

Joe Barton

Greensman

Thomas J Barton

Greensman

W Basquette

Video Assist/Playback

Lola Beltran

Song Performer

Craig Berkey

Sound Designer

Craig Berkey

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Jean Black

Makeup

Robin Blagg

Propman

Josh Blakeslee

Camera Assistant

Meg Blissell

Sign Writer

Jo Edna Boldin

Location Casting

Bryan Booth

Rigging Electrician

Chris Bradley

Digital Effects Artist

Ben Bray

Stunts

Joseph Brennan

Boom Operator

Mark Brooks

Wrangler

Tim Buchanan

Stunts

Carter Burwell

Music

Val Callaway

Production Assistant

Marcia Calosio

Assistant Set Decorator

John C Cameron

Assistant Property Master

Alexandre Cancado

Digital Effects Artist

Paul Candrilli

Grip

Chris Carroll

Assistant

Elizabeth Cash

Production Assistant

Debra Chapman

Seamstress Supervisor

Thomas Chapman

Propman

Laurence Chavez

Stunts

Victor Chavez

Propman

Ellen Chenoweth

Casting

Pete Chesney Jr.

Special Effects Foreman

Peter Chesney

Special Effects Coordinator

Tom Chesney

Special Effects Technician

David Childers

Grip

Michael Chochol

Production Assistant

Vincent Cirelli

Visual Effects Supervisor

Debra Clair

Hair Stylist

Stephen Clarke

Set Production Assistant

Buster Jacob Coen

Post-Production Assistant

Ethan Coen

Producer

Ethan Coen

Screenplay

Ethan Coen

Editor

Joel Coen

Editor

Joel Coen

Screenplay

Joel Coen

Producer

Helen Cohen

Special Makeup Effects

Andrea Coles

Assistant

Dennis Collins

Painter

Sage Emmett Connell

On-Set Dresser

Robert Corlew

Assistant Production Coordinator

Roger Deakins

Director Of Photography

Roger Deakins

Dp/Cinematographer

Roger Deakins

Camera Operator

Paul Deely

Special Effects Technician

Lori Delapp

Costume Supervisor

Michael Dellheim

Location Manager

Bac Delorme

Assistant Director

David Diliberto

Associate Producer

David Diliberto

Post-Production Supervisor

Chad Dombrova

Visual Effects

Joel Dougherty

Assistant Sound Editor

Peter Dress

Assistant Director

Jenny Eagan

Assistant Costume Designer

Emily Egge

Costumer

Melinda Eichberg

Animal Trainer

Paul Elliott

Dp/Cinematographer

Paul Elliott

Director Of Photography

Fernando Estrada

Location Manager

Marcy Etheridge

Wrangler

Chadney Everett

Set Decorator

Kevin Fahey

Rigging Grip

Catherine Farrell

Post-Production Coordinator

Michael Farrow

Music

David Fedele

Digital Effects Artist

John Claude Fedrick

Office Production Assistant

Eddie Fernandez

Stunts

Carrie Fleming

Assistant

Richard Foreman

Photography

Robbie Friedmann

Location Manager

Elizabeth Gabel

Casting

Rachael Gallaghan

Production Coordinator

Jamie Garcia

Electrician

Lakshman Garin

Stunts

Karen Ruth Getchell

Production Supervisor

Charley H Gilleran

Grip

Cole Gittinger

Cable Operator

John P. Goldsmith

Art Director

Raul Chico Goler

Office Production Assistant

David A Gomez

Song Performer

Jess Gonchor

Production Designer

Bobbi Jo Gonzales

Property Master

Robert Graf

Unit Production Manager

Robert Graf

Executive Producer

Andy Graham

Camera Operator

George Greene

Electrician

Peter Grendle

Production Assistant

Paul Haag

On-Set Dresser

Nancy Haigh

Set Decorator

Jason Hamer

Makeup Effects

Bruce Hamme

Dolly Grip

H Haden Hammond

Visual Effects Supervisor

Paul Harman

Sign Writer

Catherine Harper

Foley Artist

Andy Harris

Camera Assistant

Barbara Harris

Voice Casting

Michael Hatzer

Color Timer

Delia Hauser

Costumer

John Hazzard

Digital Effects Artist

Jim Henry

Stunts

Milton Hernandez

Song Performer

Hank Herrera

Rigging Grip

Jery Hewitt

Unit Director

Jery Hewitt

Stunt Coordinator

Gregory L Hill

Graphic Designer

Brian Hillard

Models

Toby Holguin

Stunts

Katy Houska

Casting Assistant

Scott E Hussion

Production Assistant

Kenton Jakub

Adr Editor

Jai James

Assistant Director

Roderick Jaynes

Producer

Roderick Jaynes

Editor

Roderick Jaynes

Screenplay

Deborah Jensen

Assistant Art Director

Arlen J Johnson

Foreman

Caylen F Johnson

Welder

Justin Johnson

Digital Effects

Randy Johnson

Boom Operator

Thomas R Johnston

Script Supervisor

Emmet Kane

Special Effects Technician

Gary Kangrga

Rigging Grip

Todd Kasow

Music Editor

Tommy Kelii

Electrician

Nathan Kelly

Assistant

Nikki Kelly

Production Assistant

Michael Kennedy

Film Lab

Scott Kidner

Chief Lighting Technician

Tracy Kilpatrick

Casting

Ernie Klein

Assistant

Wendy Klein

Digital Effects Artist

Marie Kohl

Casting Assistant

Cheryl Kurk

Production Accountant

Lisa Kurk

Accountant

Peter Kurland

Sound Mixer

Catie Laffoon

Post-Production Assistant

Joe Lane

Assistant Location Manager

Louis A Lanni

Set Production Assistant

Edward Andrew Lassak

Transportation Captain

Nikki Leblanc

Rigging Electrician

Paul Leblanc

Hair

Khary Lee

Animal Trainer

Skip Lievsay

Supervising Sound Editor

Skip Lievsay

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Mitch Lillian

Grip

Jason Locke

Digital Effects Artist

Jeff Lomaglio

Grip

Yolanda Lopez

Other

William F. Luehm

Coordinator

Valy Lungoccia

Digital Effects Artist

Chris Mack

Camera Assistant

Jason Mack

On-Set Dresser

Betsy Magruder

Assistant Director

Dale Malley

Medic

John Mancha

Song Performer

Jennifer Mancuso

Production Secretary

Darrin Mann

Foley Mixer

Roberta Marquez

Art Department Coordinator

Rick Marroquin

Grip

Ryon Marshall

Wrangler

Pat Martine

Painter

Jerry Martinez

Foreman

Carmen Matthews

Craft Service

Quentin Matthys

On-Set Dresser

Carol Maxwell

Cashier

Cormac Mccarthy

Source Material

Mimi N Mcgreal

Transportation Coordinator

Katharine Mcquerrey

Assistant Editor

Mamie Mitchell

Script Supervisor

Glenn Moran

Rigging Electrician

Cee Moravec

On-Set Dresser

Chris Moriana

Foley Artist

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Adventure
Black Comedy
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Western
Period
Adaptation
Release Date
2007
Production Company
Cole Gittinger
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX
Location
Marfa, Texas, USA; Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 2m

Award Wins

Best Adapted Screenplay

2007

Best Adapted Screenplay

2008
Joel Coen

Best Director

2007
Joel Coen

Best Director

2008
Ethan Coen

Best Director

2008
Joel Coen

Best Picture

2007

Best Picture

2008

Best Supporting Actor

2007
Javier Bardem

Best Supporting Actor

2008
Javier Bardem

Award Nominations

Best Cinematography

2007

Best Editing

2007

Best Sound

2007

Best Sound Editing

2007

Articles

No Country for Old Men


"There are no clean getaways," reads the original poster for the Coen Brothers film No Country for Old Men. It's a fitting introduction and epitaph to the film, faithfully adapted from the novel by Cormac McCarthy. The project did not originate with Joel and Ethan Coen, who were working on bringing James Dickey's novel "To the White Sea" to the screen when their financing fell through. Scott Rudin, who optioned "No Country" before publication, thought that the Coens would have an affinity for the dark themes and unexpected turns of the story, a combination getaway tale, chase thriller, and detective story with three main characters who pursue one another but never share a scene together. "We're naturally attracted to subverting genre," Joel explained to Los Angeles Times critic Kenneth Turan. "We liked the fact that the bad guys never really meet the good guys, that McCarthy did not follow through on formula expectations." It was, simply put, a perfect match of story and storyteller.

Set in West Texas in 1980, when the drug wars were crossing the border and leaving a trail of violence, the story concerns Llewelyn Moss, a cowboy who returns from a poaching trip with a fortune in drug money, a pitiless killer named Anton Chigurh, who sets out to recover the money and the thief, and Sheriff Bell, a dedicated lawman with a laconic manner and the best intentions. The Coens wrote a remarkably faithful adaptation, making minor changes but preserving the tone, structure, and story. "The story is very much about how unforgiving and capricious the world can be," summed up Ethan Coen in an interview with IGN.

Anton Chigurh and Sheriff Bell were the first roles cast. The Coens had always wanted to work with Javier Bardem and the character of Chigurh, whose description in the novel is purposely left vague, seemed to be a perfect opportunity. As Joel describes it, "one of the things that you do get in the book is the sense that he's the one character that's not sort of 'of the region' -- that there's something exotic or maybe foreign about him." Bardem brought an indeterminate accent and an unnerving stillness to the role but the most striking dimension may be his haircut. "We saw that hair in a photograph of a guy in a bar in a Texas border town in 1979, and we just copied it," explained Joel. As Bardem told the Los Angeles Times, "You don't have to act the haircut; the haircut is acting by itself ... so you don't have to act weird if you have that weird haircut."

Tommy Lee Jones, who was born in Texas not far from where the film was set, was a natural for the role of Sheriff Bell. In Ethan's words, "There's a short list of people who could play that part at the basic level of the qualities you need: age, screen presence and the need to really inhabit that region and that landscape." Jones also had an affinity with the material. The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005), a film that Jones co-wrote and directed, explored similar themes as No Country and he had previously worked on an unproduced screenplay adaptation of McCarthy's novel "Blood Meridian." "Cormac is our best living prose stylist... and he's also a friend," he told me in a 2007 interview. "I think the Coen Brothers did a very fine job of representing Cormac's work on the screen."

The Coens found that the most difficult role to cast was Llewelyn, which went to Josh Brolin, an actor with a fairly lengthy resume (he made his debut in the 1985 adventure The Goonies and has worked steadily since) but had not broken through as a star. "We needed the same combination we had with Tommy: someone with equal weight who could authentically be part of that landscape," described Joel. "Those two things together ... we were surprised how difficult it was, and we weren't happy until he walked in." Filling in key supporting roles are Woody Harrelson as bounty hunter Carson Wells and Kelly Macdonald as Llewelyn's wife Carla Jean.

The Coens were no stranger to bloodshed in their films--their debut Blood Simple (1984) says as much in the title and Miller's Crossing (1990) was a gangster film with plenty of gunplay--but No Country for Old Men is, by Joel Coen's own admission, "by far the most violent thing we've ever made." Chigurh has an unconventional weapon of choice and isn't one to leave witnesses behind. In an early scene, he escapes arrest by killing a police officer with the man's own handcuffs. To make the murder suitably grisly and violent, the special effects crew created body armor for the "victim" that protected him from stomach to neck and piped fake blood to spurt out of a gory neck wound. Special make-up effects artist Christien Tinsley created bloated corpses to depict the victims of a shoot-out left to bake in the Texas desert. "They've put violence on screen before, lots of it, but not like this," described Kenneth Turan in his review for NPR. "No Country for Old Men doesn't celebrate or smile at violence; it despairs of it."

"It's the closest we'll come to an action movie," remarked Ethan in a 2007 interview. The Coens' reputation is largely built on visual inventiveness and narrative cleverness but this is a different method of filmmaking, a model of simple, strong, evocative storytelling pared down to the bone. There is little dialogue and the performers express character as much in their body language and physical performance as in their words. In Joel's words, "It's about physical activity in order to achieve a purpose, which honestly we've always been fascinated by." Roger Deakins, who shot all the Coens' films since Barton Fink (1991), delivers simple and stark images and gives the desert a desolate, isolated quality that sometimes feels like it's a lawless frontier.

The Coens did not meet Cormac McCarthy before taking on the project or during the adaptation process but much of the film was shot in New Mexico, near the author's home, and he came to the set to observe the shooting. "He didn't yell at us," quipped Ethan to Charlie Rose. "We were actually sitting in a movie theater/screening room with him when he saw it... and I heard him chuckle a couple of times, so I took that as a seal of approval, I don't know, maybe presumptuously."

Joel and Ethan Coen earned their first Academy Award for their original screenplay for Fargo (1996). No Country for Old Men earned them a full set of trophies. It was nominated for seven Academy Awards and won four, including Best Picture (which the Coens shared with Scott Rudin), Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay (which they shared between themselves), and Javier Bardem for Best Supporting Actor. The Coens were also honored with awards from the Director's Guild of America and the Screen Writers Guild, Roger Deakins picked up awards from BAFTA and the British Society of Cinematographers for his work, the Screen Actors Guild honored Bardem and the ensemble as a whole with awards, and the film dominated critics' awards and year-end best lists.

No Country for Old Men is filled with richly-drawn characters, vivid yet stark images that appear to have been carved directly into the screen itself, and an enthralling story that builds merciless momentum as events spin out of the control of everyone but the filmmakers, whose methodical deliberateness tracks every detail of the story. The Coens don't offer that comforting sense of cosmic justice or poetic irony that most crime movies provide. Their world is neither compassionate nor cruel, simply indifferent and unforgiving, a fatal game of chance where a random encounter or the flip of a coin can mean the difference between life and death.

Sources:
The Making of No Country for Old Men, documentary directed by Kevin Gill. Miramax, 2008.
Working With the Coens, documentary directed by Kevin Gill. Miramax, 2008.
The Diary of a Country Sheriff, documentary directed by Kevin Gill. Miramax, 2008.
Charlie Rose. PBS, Nov. 16, 2007.
"Coens' Brutal Brilliance Again on Display," Kenneth Turan. Los Angeles Times, May 18, 2007.
"We've killed a lot of animals," John Patterson. The Guardian, Dec 21, 2007.
"Inteview: Joel and Ethan Coen." IGN, Nov 9, 2007.
"A Moment with Tommy Lee Jones / actor," Sean Axmaker. Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Sept 13, 2007.

By Sean Axmaker
No Country For Old Men

No Country for Old Men

"There are no clean getaways," reads the original poster for the Coen Brothers film No Country for Old Men. It's a fitting introduction and epitaph to the film, faithfully adapted from the novel by Cormac McCarthy. The project did not originate with Joel and Ethan Coen, who were working on bringing James Dickey's novel "To the White Sea" to the screen when their financing fell through. Scott Rudin, who optioned "No Country" before publication, thought that the Coens would have an affinity for the dark themes and unexpected turns of the story, a combination getaway tale, chase thriller, and detective story with three main characters who pursue one another but never share a scene together. "We're naturally attracted to subverting genre," Joel explained to Los Angeles Times critic Kenneth Turan. "We liked the fact that the bad guys never really meet the good guys, that McCarthy did not follow through on formula expectations." It was, simply put, a perfect match of story and storyteller. Set in West Texas in 1980, when the drug wars were crossing the border and leaving a trail of violence, the story concerns Llewelyn Moss, a cowboy who returns from a poaching trip with a fortune in drug money, a pitiless killer named Anton Chigurh, who sets out to recover the money and the thief, and Sheriff Bell, a dedicated lawman with a laconic manner and the best intentions. The Coens wrote a remarkably faithful adaptation, making minor changes but preserving the tone, structure, and story. "The story is very much about how unforgiving and capricious the world can be," summed up Ethan Coen in an interview with IGN. Anton Chigurh and Sheriff Bell were the first roles cast. The Coens had always wanted to work with Javier Bardem and the character of Chigurh, whose description in the novel is purposely left vague, seemed to be a perfect opportunity. As Joel describes it, "one of the things that you do get in the book is the sense that he's the one character that's not sort of 'of the region' -- that there's something exotic or maybe foreign about him." Bardem brought an indeterminate accent and an unnerving stillness to the role but the most striking dimension may be his haircut. "We saw that hair in a photograph of a guy in a bar in a Texas border town in 1979, and we just copied it," explained Joel. As Bardem told the Los Angeles Times, "You don't have to act the haircut; the haircut is acting by itself ... so you don't have to act weird if you have that weird haircut." Tommy Lee Jones, who was born in Texas not far from where the film was set, was a natural for the role of Sheriff Bell. In Ethan's words, "There's a short list of people who could play that part at the basic level of the qualities you need: age, screen presence and the need to really inhabit that region and that landscape." Jones also had an affinity with the material. The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005), a film that Jones co-wrote and directed, explored similar themes as No Country and he had previously worked on an unproduced screenplay adaptation of McCarthy's novel "Blood Meridian." "Cormac is our best living prose stylist... and he's also a friend," he told me in a 2007 interview. "I think the Coen Brothers did a very fine job of representing Cormac's work on the screen." The Coens found that the most difficult role to cast was Llewelyn, which went to Josh Brolin, an actor with a fairly lengthy resume (he made his debut in the 1985 adventure The Goonies and has worked steadily since) but had not broken through as a star. "We needed the same combination we had with Tommy: someone with equal weight who could authentically be part of that landscape," described Joel. "Those two things together ... we were surprised how difficult it was, and we weren't happy until he walked in." Filling in key supporting roles are Woody Harrelson as bounty hunter Carson Wells and Kelly Macdonald as Llewelyn's wife Carla Jean. The Coens were no stranger to bloodshed in their films--their debut Blood Simple (1984) says as much in the title and Miller's Crossing (1990) was a gangster film with plenty of gunplay--but No Country for Old Men is, by Joel Coen's own admission, "by far the most violent thing we've ever made." Chigurh has an unconventional weapon of choice and isn't one to leave witnesses behind. In an early scene, he escapes arrest by killing a police officer with the man's own handcuffs. To make the murder suitably grisly and violent, the special effects crew created body armor for the "victim" that protected him from stomach to neck and piped fake blood to spurt out of a gory neck wound. Special make-up effects artist Christien Tinsley created bloated corpses to depict the victims of a shoot-out left to bake in the Texas desert. "They've put violence on screen before, lots of it, but not like this," described Kenneth Turan in his review for NPR. "No Country for Old Men doesn't celebrate or smile at violence; it despairs of it." "It's the closest we'll come to an action movie," remarked Ethan in a 2007 interview. The Coens' reputation is largely built on visual inventiveness and narrative cleverness but this is a different method of filmmaking, a model of simple, strong, evocative storytelling pared down to the bone. There is little dialogue and the performers express character as much in their body language and physical performance as in their words. In Joel's words, "It's about physical activity in order to achieve a purpose, which honestly we've always been fascinated by." Roger Deakins, who shot all the Coens' films since Barton Fink (1991), delivers simple and stark images and gives the desert a desolate, isolated quality that sometimes feels like it's a lawless frontier. The Coens did not meet Cormac McCarthy before taking on the project or during the adaptation process but much of the film was shot in New Mexico, near the author's home, and he came to the set to observe the shooting. "He didn't yell at us," quipped Ethan to Charlie Rose. "We were actually sitting in a movie theater/screening room with him when he saw it... and I heard him chuckle a couple of times, so I took that as a seal of approval, I don't know, maybe presumptuously." Joel and Ethan Coen earned their first Academy Award for their original screenplay for Fargo (1996). No Country for Old Men earned them a full set of trophies. It was nominated for seven Academy Awards and won four, including Best Picture (which the Coens shared with Scott Rudin), Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay (which they shared between themselves), and Javier Bardem for Best Supporting Actor. The Coens were also honored with awards from the Director's Guild of America and the Screen Writers Guild, Roger Deakins picked up awards from BAFTA and the British Society of Cinematographers for his work, the Screen Actors Guild honored Bardem and the ensemble as a whole with awards, and the film dominated critics' awards and year-end best lists. No Country for Old Men is filled with richly-drawn characters, vivid yet stark images that appear to have been carved directly into the screen itself, and an enthralling story that builds merciless momentum as events spin out of the control of everyone but the filmmakers, whose methodical deliberateness tracks every detail of the story. The Coens don't offer that comforting sense of cosmic justice or poetic irony that most crime movies provide. Their world is neither compassionate nor cruel, simply indifferent and unforgiving, a fatal game of chance where a random encounter or the flip of a coin can mean the difference between life and death. Sources: The Making of No Country for Old Men, documentary directed by Kevin Gill. Miramax, 2008. Working With the Coens, documentary directed by Kevin Gill. Miramax, 2008. The Diary of a Country Sheriff, documentary directed by Kevin Gill. Miramax, 2008. Charlie Rose. PBS, Nov. 16, 2007. "Coens' Brutal Brilliance Again on Display," Kenneth Turan. Los Angeles Times, May 18, 2007. "We've killed a lot of animals," John Patterson. The Guardian, Dec 21, 2007. "Inteview: Joel and Ethan Coen." IGN, Nov 9, 2007. "A Moment with Tommy Lee Jones / actor," Sean Axmaker. Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Sept 13, 2007. By Sean Axmaker

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Voted one of the 10 best films of 2007 by the American Film Institute (AFI).

Winner of four 2007 awards including Best Film, Best Director, Best Ensemble and Best Supporting Actor (Javier Bardem) by the Washington DC Area Film Critics Association (WAFCA).

Winner of four 2007 awards including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Supporting Actor (Javier Bardem) by the Chicago Film Critics Association (CFCA).

Winner of four 2007 awards including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best Supporting Actor (Javier Bardem) by the Toronto Film Critics Association (TFCA).

Winner of four 2007 awards including Best Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor (Javier Bardem), Best Director and Best Picture by the New York Film Critics Circle (NYFCC).

Winner of the 2007 award for Best Adapted Screenplay by the Writers Guild of America (WGA).

Winner of the 2007 award for Best Director by the San Francisco Film Critics Circle (SFFCC).

Winner of the 2007 award for Excellence In Production Design For A Contemporary Feature Film by the Art Directors Guild (ADG).

Winner of the 2007 award for Film of the Year and co-winner of the award for British Actress of the Year in a Supporting Role (Kelly MacDonald) by the London Critics' Circle.

Winner of the 2007 award for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Mixing by the Cinema Audio Society (CAS).

Winner of the 2007 award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film by the Directors Guild of America (DGA).

Winner of the 2007 Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award in Theatrical Motion Pictures by the Producers Guild of America (PGA).

Winner of three 2007 awards including Best Director, Best Supporting Actor (Javier Bardem) and Best Cinematography by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA).

Winner of three 2007 awards including Best Film, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Ensemble Cast by the National Board of Review (NBR).

Winner of two 2007 awards including Best Picture and Best Supporting Actor (Javier Bardem) by the Boston Society of Film Critics (BSFC).

Winner of two 2007 awards including Best Supporting Actor (Javier Bardem) and Best Cast by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG).

Winner of two 2007 Satellite Awards including Best Motion Picture - Drama and Best Director by the International Press Academy (IPA).

Limited Release in United States November 9, 2007

Released in United States Fall November 9, 2007

Released in United States on Video March 11, 2008

Released in United States 2007

Released in United States December 2007

Shown at New York Film Festival (Centerpiece) September 28-October 14, 2007.

Shown at Dubai International Film Festival (Cinema of the World) December 9-16, 2007.

Based on the novel "No Country for Old Men" by Cormac McCarthy; published by Knopf July 19, 2005.

Literary Sale Date: 2/07/2004.

Limited Release in United States November 9, 2007

Released in United States Fall November 9, 2007

Released in United States on Video March 11, 2008

Released in United States 2007 (Shown at New York Film Festival (Centerpiece) September 28-October 14, 2007.)

Released in United States December 2007 (Shown at Dubai International Film Festival (Cinema of the World) December 9-16, 2007.)

Winner of the 2008 Artios Award for Feature Film - Drama by the Casting Society of America (CSA).