An Inconvenient Truth


1h 36m 2006
An Inconvenient Truth

Brief Synopsis

Former Vice President Al Gore campaigns to expose the dangers of global warming while inspiring the public to take actions to prevent it.

Film Details

Also Known As
Al Gore: An Inconvenient Truth, En obekväm sanning, Inconvenient Truth, Matter of Degrees, vérité qui dérange
Genre
Documentary
Political
Release Date
2006
Distribution Company
Paramount Vantage

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Synopsis

A look at former Vice President Al Gore's commitment to expose the myths and misconceptions that surround global warming and inspire actions to prevent it. Gore, who, in the wake of the defeat in the 2000 election, re-set the course of his life to focus on an all-out effort to help save the planet from irrevocable change. With 2005, the worst storm season ever experienced in America just behind us, it seems we may be reaching a tipping point--and Gore pulls no punches in explaining the dire situation. Interspersed with the bracing facts and future predictions is the story of Gore's personal journey: from an idealistic college student who first saw a massive environmental crisis looming; to a young Senator facing a harrowing family tragedy that altered his perspective; to the man who almost became President but instead returned to the most impassioned cause of his life--convinced that there is still time to make a difference.

Crew

Javier Alvarez

Editor

Bryan Arenas

Consultant

Joaquin Baca-asay

Cinematographer

Joaquin Baca-asay

Dp/Cinematographer

Doug Bain

Camera Utility

Kara Baker

Production Assistant

Gregory Bartlett

Photography

Gregory Bartlett

Production Supervisor

Regan Beam

Production Assistant

Tom Beck

Lighting

Ritamarie Beeman

Makeup

Lawrence Bender

Producer

Tom Bergin

Sound

Claire Bernard

Production Assistant

George Berndt

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Byron Blades

Camera Utility

Tony Bocigalupi

Production Assistant

Susan Bradley

Titles

Allen Branton

Lighting

Faith Brewer

Assistant Camera

Daniel J Brewster

Technical Coordinator

Trip Brock

Rerecording

Michael Brook

Original Music

Brian Buel

Projectionist

Scott Burns

Producer

John Calkins

Production Designer

Jonathan Carrol

Production Assistant

Suzanne Carter

Gaffer

Gwen Cassidy

Researcher

Jay Cassidy

Editor

Brent Chambers

Animator

Josh Cherwin

Advisor

Lesley Chilcott

Unit Production Manager

Lesley Chilcott

Coproducer

Lesley Chilcott

Sound

Patrick Clancey

On-Line Editor

Curtis Clark

Dp/Cinematographer

Curtis Clark

Cinematographer

Dayna Clark

Production Assistant

Heather Coker

Production Assistant

J C Cole

Grip

John K. Corser

Production Assistant

Rob Crawford

Coordinator

Laurie David

Producer

Patti Dequaker

Rights & Clearances

Evan Deyo

Production Assistant

Joel Dougherty

Sound Effects Editor

Owen Edinger

Assistant Editor

Melissa Etheridge

Song Performer

Melissa Etheridge

Song

Jae Fan

Cinematographer

Jae Fan

Dp/Cinematographer

Tad Fatum

Assistant Editor

Larry Ferguson

Production Consultant

Bob Fernley

Visual Effects Producer

Brian Fisher

Visual Effects

Joe Rea Fontes

Production Assistant

Michael Fox

Rerecording

Alan Freedman

Adr Mixer

Mitch Gardiner

Digital Effects Artist

Laurie Anne Gardner

Production Assistant

Beau J Genot

Post-Production Supervisor

Brian George

Colorist

Chris Girard

Post-Production Coordinator

Dan Gleich

Sound

Dan Goldich

Projectionist

Dave Grayson

Lighting Technician

Davis Guggenheim

Dp/Cinematographer

Davis Guggenheim

Cinematographer

Davis Guggenheim

Executive Producer

Rich Hama

Production Assistant

Brian Han

Assistant

D J Harder

Assistant Camera

Susu Hauser

Production Coordinator

Ally Hawkins

Assistant

Lynda Hayden

Researcher

Trevor Herrick

Production Supervisor

Helen Hiatt

Tailor

Andy Hicks

Production Assistant

Terry Hillman

Sound

Li Hongqiang

Boom Operator

P.k. Hooker

Sound Effects Editor

Beth Horton

Assistant Camera

Shi Hui

Camera Assistant

Michael Hulswit

Production Assistant

Andrew Isaacson

Visual Effects Producer

Jeff Ivers

Executive Producer

Elena Jacobson

Assistant

Liu Jilei

Camera Assistant

Jerry Kaman

Technical Operations Manager

Daniel Kent

Sound

Matthew Klipper

Production Accountant

Jason Korstad

Production Coordinator

Darren Langer

Gaffer

Drew Langer

Production Assistant

Shaun Latham

Production Assistant

Eric Lee

Photography

Steve Lesieur

Assistant Sound Editor

Joe Lewis

Stage Manager

Skip Lievsay

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Skip Lievsay

Supervising Sound Editor

Robert Magno

Production Assistant

John Maschio

Production Assistant

Victor Mathieu

Production

Asim Matin

Assistant Editor

Eric Matthews

Production Assistant

Evan Matthews

Production Assistant

Jim Mccarthy

Production Accountant

Michael Mcdermott

Line Producer

Stefan Medin

Production Assistant

Scott Miller

Gaffer

Thomas Moore

Art Director

Jared Neher

Production Assistant

Eddie O'connor

Sound

Dawn Oliver

Assistant

Ben Olson

Production Assistant

Tommy Park

Assistant Editor

Sara Peddicord

Assistant

John Perez

Sound Mixer

Brian Potter

Camera Operator

Kevin Prendiville

Digital Effects Artist

John Pritchett

Camera Operator

Troy Rackley

Assistant Editor

Pete Radice

Lighting

Jill Ragan

Production Assistant

Leo Randolph

Sound

Marina Ray

Wardrobe

Robert Reicher

Music

Keith Relkin

Researcher

Carrie Richard

Camera Operator

Bob Richman

Cinematographer

Bob Richman

Dp/Cinematographer

Steven Rood

Production Supervisor

Mark Rozett

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Stephen Ruskowski

Researcher

Jan Schulte

Sound

Michael Schwartz

Camera Operator

Carson Siemann

Production Assistant

Jeff Skoll

Executive Producer

Sharon H Smith

Music Editor

Joia Speciale

Assistant Camera

Travis Steinberg

Camera Utility

John Michael Stewart

Assistant Director

Rebecca Weigold Stocker

Assistant Editor

Ricky Strauss

Executive Producer

Carey Ann Strelecki

Researcher

Dan Swietlik

Editor

Xie Tao

Camera Assistant

Katie Taylor

Production Assistant

Neil Taylor

Audio

Amber Thompson

Production Assistant

Paul Trautman

Sound

Skye Catherine Turner

Production Assistant

Bryan Walker

Production Assistant

Edward Wambach

Production Assistant

Guo Wei

Camera Assistant

Chuck Weiss

Videotape Operator

Stuart Wesolik

Video

Diane Weyermann

Executive Producer

Michelle Blair Wilker

Production Coordinator

Paul Wittman

Sound

Melissa Wong

Script Supervisor

Dawn V Woolen

Assistant

Jonathan X

Assistant Director

Lu Xuelei

Sound

Marianna Yarovskaya

Researcher

Jim Young

Gaffer

Liu Yuhai

Production Supervisor

Hao Yunming

Swing

Ma Yunming

Gaffer

Film Details

Also Known As
Al Gore: An Inconvenient Truth, En obekväm sanning, Inconvenient Truth, Matter of Degrees, vérité qui dérange
Genre
Documentary
Political
Release Date
2006
Distribution Company
Paramount Vantage

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Award Wins

Best Documentary Feature

2006

Best Documentary Feature

2007
Davis Guggenheim

Best Song

2006

Articles

An Inconvenient Truth


Documentaries, more often than not, make little impact on the world around them. Even fewer actually attempt to make an impact on the world around them. Davis Guggenheim's documentary of former Vice President Al Gore's slideshow presentation on the environment, An Inconvenient Truth (2006), attempted to do just that and became one of the most controversial documentaries ever released.

There was a time when climate change would have never been considered a political issue but, as seemingly with all things in the modern age, it became one. When Al Gore started talking about the environment in the early eighties, no one considered it a touchy area. After all, we all live here and the climate affects every living creature. But by the time Gore began giving his climate warming presentation, two sides had been formed. One in which the science was considered undeniable and a call to action, and another in which it was all disputable and overblown. In 2006, when the documentary was released to the public, the lines had been drawn.

As this is not a science article, nor a political one, the merits of the documentary as a film should be all that matters. But, of course, when a documentary is intertwined with its political and scientific mission, that's almost impossible. The merits of what Gore says matter too. Unfortunately, despite the scientific consensus being in Gore's corner, his critics still question that merit to this day.

The documentary includes more than just Gore explaining that the climate of the planet is changing. It also includes brief insights into his personal demons, struggling with his sister's death, and dealing with the loss of the 2000 election. But it is the scientific presentation that carries the weight of the documentary and that presentation, despite being little more than a glorified slideshow, is surprisingly captivating.

Using images of the earth from outer space, humorous animation, and, above all, a wealth of scientific data, Gore expertly details that changing climate of the planet and the troubles it bodes for the future. He explains that steps need to be taken to mitigate the changes and that without them, we may hit a tipping point from which there is no return. The problem with this is that no one can say with certainty where that tipping point will be so Gore is relying on the urgency of his message to sway people to action.

Before 2006, the call to action on climate change was not nearly as strong as it was after and a large part of that is due to Gore's presentation, filmed by Guggenheim. Whether one wants to argue the merits of Gore's point or not, the success should be measured in visibility and awareness raised and in those two areas, An Inconvenient Truth is a home run. It raised awareness of the fragility of our one and only planet in a way nothing had before, and nothing has since, including a not very successful sequel.

The documentary came about when producer Laurie David saw Gore give the presentation at a local town hall meeting. She was blown away and quickly approached Gore about making it into a documentary. With the assistance of producer Lawrence Bender, the three got Davis Guggenheim to direct and, once released, the film became a sensation. Its several accolades and prizes culminated in an Academy Award for Best Documentary. Not only that, it became the first documentary to also take home a second Oscar, this time for Best Song.

The strength of science is that it adapts and conforms to new data. It does not rest on dogma or dictate. Has the scientific data changed since this film was released? Almost assuredly. But that doesn't mean the previous information founded by science is obsolete or incorrect. On the contrary, the new data merely builds off previous data by scientists. This film still remains both impactful and necessary as a call to arms for the environmental movement. With scientific knowledge progressing, Gore's enthusiasm in presenting the subject continues to be invigorating and enlightening along with it.

Director: Davis Guggenheim Producers: Lawrence Bender, Laurie David, Scott Z. Burns Writer: Al Gore Music: Michael Brook Cinematography: Davis Guggenheim, Robert Richman Film Editing: Jay Cassidy , Dan Swietlik Song ("I Need to Wake Up"): Melissa Etheridge Cast: Al Gore (Himself)

By Greg Ferrara
An Inconvenient Truth

An Inconvenient Truth

Documentaries, more often than not, make little impact on the world around them. Even fewer actually attempt to make an impact on the world around them. Davis Guggenheim's documentary of former Vice President Al Gore's slideshow presentation on the environment, An Inconvenient Truth (2006), attempted to do just that and became one of the most controversial documentaries ever released. There was a time when climate change would have never been considered a political issue but, as seemingly with all things in the modern age, it became one. When Al Gore started talking about the environment in the early eighties, no one considered it a touchy area. After all, we all live here and the climate affects every living creature. But by the time Gore began giving his climate warming presentation, two sides had been formed. One in which the science was considered undeniable and a call to action, and another in which it was all disputable and overblown. In 2006, when the documentary was released to the public, the lines had been drawn. As this is not a science article, nor a political one, the merits of the documentary as a film should be all that matters. But, of course, when a documentary is intertwined with its political and scientific mission, that's almost impossible. The merits of what Gore says matter too. Unfortunately, despite the scientific consensus being in Gore's corner, his critics still question that merit to this day. The documentary includes more than just Gore explaining that the climate of the planet is changing. It also includes brief insights into his personal demons, struggling with his sister's death, and dealing with the loss of the 2000 election. But it is the scientific presentation that carries the weight of the documentary and that presentation, despite being little more than a glorified slideshow, is surprisingly captivating. Using images of the earth from outer space, humorous animation, and, above all, a wealth of scientific data, Gore expertly details that changing climate of the planet and the troubles it bodes for the future. He explains that steps need to be taken to mitigate the changes and that without them, we may hit a tipping point from which there is no return. The problem with this is that no one can say with certainty where that tipping point will be so Gore is relying on the urgency of his message to sway people to action. Before 2006, the call to action on climate change was not nearly as strong as it was after and a large part of that is due to Gore's presentation, filmed by Guggenheim. Whether one wants to argue the merits of Gore's point or not, the success should be measured in visibility and awareness raised and in those two areas, An Inconvenient Truth is a home run. It raised awareness of the fragility of our one and only planet in a way nothing had before, and nothing has since, including a not very successful sequel. The documentary came about when producer Laurie David saw Gore give the presentation at a local town hall meeting. She was blown away and quickly approached Gore about making it into a documentary. With the assistance of producer Lawrence Bender, the three got Davis Guggenheim to direct and, once released, the film became a sensation. Its several accolades and prizes culminated in an Academy Award for Best Documentary. Not only that, it became the first documentary to also take home a second Oscar, this time for Best Song. The strength of science is that it adapts and conforms to new data. It does not rest on dogma or dictate. Has the scientific data changed since this film was released? Almost assuredly. But that doesn't mean the previous information founded by science is obsolete or incorrect. On the contrary, the new data merely builds off previous data by scientists. This film still remains both impactful and necessary as a call to arms for the environmental movement. With scientific knowledge progressing, Gore's enthusiasm in presenting the subject continues to be invigorating and enlightening along with it. Director: Davis Guggenheim Producers: Lawrence Bender, Laurie David, Scott Z. Burns Writer: Al Gore Music: Michael Brook Cinematography: Davis Guggenheim, Robert Richman Film Editing: Jay Cassidy , Dan Swietlik Song ("I Need to Wake Up"): Melissa Etheridge Cast: Al Gore (Himself) By Greg Ferrara

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival (Documentary) January 25-February 4, 2007.

Shown at Palm Springs International Film Festival (Awards Buzz - Best Documentary Feature) January 4-15, 2007.

Scheduled to air in USA on Showtime Network March 11, 2007.

Limited Release in United States May 24, 2006

Released in United States Summer May 24, 2006

Released in United States March 11, 2007 (Showtime Network)

Released in United States on Video November 21, 2006

Released in United States January 2006 (Shown at Sundance Film Festival (Spectrum) January 19-29, 2006.)

Limited Release in United States May 24, 2006

Released in United States Summer May 24, 2006

Released in United States March 11, 2007

Released in United States on Video November 21, 2006

Released in United States January 2006

Released in United States September 2006

Released in United States 2007

Released in United States January 2007

Shown at Deauville Festival of American Cinema (Uncle Sam's Docs) September 1-10, 2006.

Winner of the John Schlesinger Award, 2007 Palm Springs International Film Festival.

Released in United States September 2006 (Shown at Deauville Festival of American Cinema (Uncle Sam's Docs) September 1-10, 2006.)

Released in United States 2007 (Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival (Documentary) January 25-February 4, 2007.)

Released in United States January 2007 (Shown at Palm Springs International Film Festival (Awards Buzz ¿ Best Documentary Feature) January 4-15, 2007.)