South of Heaven, West of Hell


2h 12m 2000

Brief Synopsis

Lawman Valentine Casey, marshall of the desolate town of Los Tragos, is forced to confront his guilty past when visited, on Christmas Eve, by members of his former foster family, the outlaw Henry clan. After Leland Henry and his henchmen arrive, Val retreats to the Arizona desert to break wild horse

Film Details

Also Known As
South of Heaven, West of Hell
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2000
Distribution Company
Blue Steel Releasing
Location
Arizona, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 12m

Synopsis

Lawman Valentine Casey, marshall of the desolate town of Los Tragos, is forced to confront his guilty past when visited, on Christmas Eve, by members of his former foster family, the outlaw Henry clan. After Leland Henry and his henchmen arrive, Val retreats to the Arizona desert to break wild horses. Just as Val comes to the even tinier town of Dunfries to sell his horses to the local blacksmith, the blacksmith's beautiful niece, Adalyne, returns home on her way to San Francisco. And of course the horrible Henrys are about to descend upon Dunfries just as they did upon Los Tragos. Will Val take off to the coast with Adalyne or this time stand his ground?

Crew

Pete Anderson

Music

David Auge

Set Production Assistant

Stan Bertheaud

Screenplay

Kevin Brennan

Gaffer

Helen Britten

Set Decorator

Doug Brown

Assistant Director

R Anthony Brown

Unit Production Manager

Tony Brown

Associate Producer

Charlie Carpenter

Driver

Lynn Champagne

Hair Stylist

Bud Clark

Costumes

Le Dawson

Costume Designer

Rick Dennis

Stunt Man

Bart Dion

Special Effects Foreman

Dennis Dion

Special Effects Coordinator

John Elmore

Assistant Director

Otto Felix

From Story

Otto Felix

Story By

Robert A. Ferretti

Editor

Gray Frederickson

Producer

Fred Gibson

Best Boy

James Glennon

Other

James Glennon

Director Of Photography

Prashant Gupta

Photography

Dennis Hackin

Story By

Dennis Hackin

From Story

Darris Hatch

Producer

Santi Hito

On-Set Dresser

Kate Jesse

Boom Operator

Gary A Kilgore

Electrician

Sophiah Koikas

Other

Manny Leyva

Sound

John Longenecker

Unit Director

Gene Looney

Props Assistant

Douglas T Madison

Property Master

Jerry L Madore

Key Grip

Maggie Mcfarland

Set Costumer

Robert Mcgee

Casting

Cliff Mclaughlin

Stunt Man

Mike Mcnally

Medic

Danny Mormino

Production Assistant

Buck Owens

Executive Producer

Scott Peterson

Script Supervisor

Linda Phillips-palo

Casting

Lisa Pi±ero-amses

Sound Mixer

Craig Pinckes

Assistant Director

Tony J Pirri

Best Boy Grip

Siobhan Roome

Production Designer

Lee Ross

Art Director

Abe Shainberg

Associate Producer

Gary W Shaw

Grip

Becky Sullivan

Adr Editor

Rudy Ugland

Animal Wrangler

Beau Wilson

Makeup Artist

Kristy Wunsch

Assistant

Darlene Wyatt

Casting

Richard E Yawn

Sound Designer

Richard E Yawn

Sound Editor

Dwight Yoakam

From Story

Dwight Yoakam

Screenplay

Dwight Yoakam

Music

Dwight Yoakam

Story By

Film Details

Also Known As
South of Heaven, West of Hell
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2000
Distribution Company
Blue Steel Releasing
Location
Arizona, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 12m

Articles

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003


Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive.

Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979).

Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's (1991) delivering a moving performance as a homeless cabaret singer with AIDS.

He scored his biggest coup when he was cast the same year in the hit sitcom Evening Shade (1991-1994) as Herman Stiles, the wimpy assistant to Reynolds, who played a pro football player turned coach. He won an Emmy award in 1992 for that role and scored two more nominations by the end of the series run. Jeter would also get some good supporting parts in many films throughout the decade: Sister Act 2 (1993), a fun comic role as Whoopi Goldberg's sidekick Father Ignatius; Mouse Hunt (1997); The Green Mile (1999), his best film role as Eduard Delacroix, a condemned murderer who befriends a cellblock mouse; Jurassic Park III (2001); and Welcome to Collinwood (2002).

At the time of his death, Jeter was appearing on the classic PBS children's series Sesame Street as the lovable but bumbling Mr. Noodle; and had been filming Robert Zemekis' Christmas movie The Polar Express starring Tom Hanks. Production was halted on Monday in observance of Jeter's death. He is survived by his life partner, Sean Blue, his parents, Dr. William and Virginia Jeter; a brother, William; and four sisters, Virginia Anne Barham, Emily Jeter, Amanda Parsons and Laurie Wicker.

by Michael T. Toole
Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive. Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979). Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Expanded Release in United States June 15, 2001

Released in United States January 2000

Released in United States May 2000

Released in United States on Video August 21, 2001

Released in United States Winter December 15, 2000

Shown at Cannes International Film Festival May 10-21, 2000.

Shown at Slamdance Film Festival (Special Screening) in Park City, Utah January 22-29, 2000 as a "work-in-progress".

Feature directorial debut for musician Dwight Yoakam.

Began shooting mid May 1999.

Completed shooting late June 1999.

Released in United States January 2000 (Shown at Slamdance Film Festival (Special Screening) in Park City, Utah January 22-29, 2000 as a "work-in-progress".)

Released in United States May 2000 (Shown at Cannes International Film Festival May 10-21, 2000.)

Expanded Release in United States June 15, 2001

Released in United States on Video August 21, 2001

Released in United States Winter December 15, 2000