Fahrenheit 9/11


2h 1m 2004

Brief Synopsis

An expose which reflects upon what has happened to America since the events of September 11, 2001 that touches upon the personal relationship between President George W. Bush and the family of terrorist Osama bin Laden. As well, the chronicle focuses on the powerful roles that oil and greed may have

Film Details

Also Known As
Fahrenheit 911
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2004
Distribution Company
FELLOWSHIP/FELLOWSHIP ADVENTURE GROUP/IFC FILMS/LIONSGATE

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 1m

Synopsis

An expose which reflects upon what has happened to America since the events of September 11, 2001 that touches upon the personal relationship between President George W. Bush and the family of terrorist Osama bin Laden. As well, the chronicle focuses on the powerful roles that oil and greed may have played in the terrorist attack on the U.S.A.

Crew

Robyn Alcock

Production Coordinator

John Alpers

Song

Ian Anderson

Song

Blake Ashman

Production Assistant

Faith Astrada

Editor

Juan Azize

Production Accountant

Crystal Bahmaie

Production Assistant

Nathaniel Bates

Production Assistant

Joe Beirne

Technical Supervisor

Francisco Bello

Assistant Editor

Elmer Bernstein

Song

William Berry

Song

Andrew Black

Camera

Jerry Bloodrock

Song

Peter Buck

Song

Charlotte Caffey

Song

Jj Cale

Song

Devereux Chatillon

Other

Eli Chessen

Production Assistant

Gautam K Choudhury

Sound

Isabella Chung

Apprentice

Suzanne Coffman

Rights & Clearances

Rebecca Cohen

Assistant Editor

Christina Colby

Production Accountant

Peter Conlin

Software Engineer

J. Fred Coots

Song

Kesshann Cortez

Production Assistant

Kelley Cribben

Post-Production Coordinator

Bing Crosby

Song Performer

Jim Czarnecki

Producer

Rita Dagher

Associate Producer

Carl Deal

Film Research

Carl Deal

Field Producer

Michael Desjarlais

Dp/Cinematographer

Michael Desjarlais

Cinematographer

Joanne Doroshow

Associate Producer

Lance Doss

Song Performer

Lance Doss

Song

Gerard Edgar

Song

Salimah El-amin

Researcher

Kurt Engfehr

Editor

Kurt Engfehr

Coproducer

Kurt Engfehr

Supervising Producer

Geoff Ernst

Production Assistant

Geoffrey Ernst

Production Assistant

Celite Evans

Song

Christine Fall

Assistant

David L Feinberg

Assistant Editor

Brendan Fitzgibbons

Apprentice

Dasaw Floyd

Assistant Editor

Derek Fludzinski

Production Assistant

Richard Fowler

Song

James Franks

Song

Stephen Geyer

Song

Jeff Gibbs

Coproducer

Jeff Gibbs

Music

Haven Gillespie

Song

Neil Girardi

Software Engineer

Kathleen Glynn

Producer

Becky Goldberg

Assistant Editor

Bob Golden

Song Performer

Bob Golden

Song

Craig Gordon

Visual Effects Editor

David Greenbaum

Assistant (Uncredited)

David Greenbaum

Other

Daniel Gregor

Production Assistant

Scott Guitteau

Sound Editor

Terry Haggar

Color Timer

Monica Hampton

Line Producer

Daniel Hancox

Apprentice

Charles Herzfeld

Film Lab

Bradford L Hohle

Consultant

Carrie Holecek

Project Manager

Khaliah Jackson

Apprentice

Kirsten Johnson

Camera

Lewanne Jones

Researcher

Tom Kaufman

Camera

Jason Kitchen

Apprentice

Francisco Latorre

Sound

Nicky Lazar

Field Producer

Frank Leal

Production Assistant

Walter Lefler

Colorist

Tia Lessin

Supervising Producer

Bernardo Loyola

Titles

Marie Luna

Production Assistant

Carolyn Rossip Malcolm

Production Accountant

Daniel Maldonado

Production Assistant

Henry Mancini

Song

Henry Mancini

Song Performer

Barry Mann

Song

Elizabeth Marcus

Production Assistant

Jay Martel

Consulting Producer

Don Mccloskey

Production Assistant

Robert Mead

On-Line Editor

Agnes Mentre

Executive Producer

Charles Miller

Sound

Michael Mills

Song

Christian Mondstein

Song

Leilani Montes

Apprentice

Anne Moore

Associate Producer

Michael Moore

Screenplay

Michael Moore

Producer

Harold Moss

Graphic Artist

Rachelle Murway

Field Producer

Huttemberg Nassar

Production Assistant

Sue Nelson

Apprentice

Julia Nessling-douglas

Project Manager

Mike Nuget

On-Line Editor

Meghan O'hara

Field Producer

Tim O'shea

Apprentice

Luis A Ortiz

Assistant Editor

Stephanie Palumbo

Production Assistant

Arvo Part

Song

Arvo Part

Song Performer

Charles Pettiford

Song

Jason Pollock

Assistant

Jason Pollock

Camera

Michael Pollock

Apprentice

Mike Post

Song

Jennifer Price

Song

William Rexer

Camera

Todd Woody Richman

Editor

Gary A. Rizzo

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Gary A. Rizzo

Supervising Sound Editor

J Robb

Production Assistant

Leanne Rock

Production Accountant

Mike Rogers

Production Assistant

Paul Ross

Production Assistant

Miklos Rozsa

Song

David Rumble

Production Assistant

Paul Rusnak

Sound

Manel Saddique

Apprentice

Joey Scarbury

Song Performer

David Schankula

Researcher

Walter Schumann

Song

Christopher Seward

Editor

Jesse Shane

Production Assistant

Vico Sharabani

Digital Effects Artist

Bangbay Siboliban

Apprentice Editor

John Starace

Digital Effects Artist

Amanda Steigerwald

Production Assistant

Romy Stevenson

Production Assistant

Michael Stipe

Song

The Andrews Sisters

Song Performer

Brad Thompson

Apprentice

Will Tordella

Production Assistant

Rich Torpey

Software Engineer

Emma Trask

Coordinator

Jethro Tull

Song Performer

David S Tung

Editor

William Turnley

Camera

Kathy Valentine

Song

Joe Violante

Film Lab

Bill Vourvoulias

Other

Evin Watson

Production Assistant

Cynthia Weil

Song

Eric Weinrib

Researcher

Bob Weinstein

Executive Producer

Harvey Weinstein

Executive Producer

Jane Wiedlin

Song

Greg Wigfall

Song

Doug Williams

Apprentice

Jamie Wong

Production Assistant

Jeremy Yaches

Production Assistant

Neil Young

Song

Neil Young

Song Performer

Melinda Ziyadat

Production Assistant

Film Details

Also Known As
Fahrenheit 911
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2004
Distribution Company
FELLOWSHIP/FELLOWSHIP ADVENTURE GROUP/IFC FILMS/LIONSGATE

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 1m

Articles

Fahrenheit 9/11 -


In 1989, Michael Moore changed the face of documentary filmmaking with his sensational documentary, Roger and Me. Moore made his own face, that is to say himself, the subject of all of his documentaries since. Whatever the subject matter at hand, the real subject of every Michael Moore documentary is Michael Moore. Whether this has changed documentary filmmaking for the better is decidedly up to the viewer. When one sees a movie by Michael Moore, one knows going in, or should at least, that what the documentary is really about is how Moore feels about the subject at hand, not the subject itself. And so, we arrive at just why Moore's documentaries are so controversial.

On September 11th, 2001, the United States was deliberately and ruthlessly attacked by terrorists, killing thousands in an act that shocked and horrified the world. In the months that followed, new security measures were enacted, new acts were passed, and, in the years that followed, America committed to war in Afghanistan and Iraq in response. At least, that's the story that we were told but Michael Moore doesn't quite believe it. That fateful morning of September 11th is where Fahrenheit 9/11 begins.

In the weeks after the attacks, the reaction of the president came into focus. He was doing a reading session at an elementary school in Sarasota, Florida when he was informed of the second attack on the World Trade Center. Some critics felt he should have abruptly left, but President Bush felt it was more important to keep the children calm until he knew more about what was going on. Michael Moore shows this event with a timer on the screen as we watch the president reading the book with the children. The implication being that the president took far too long to react than he should have because he was indecisive. And that is the Michael Moore signature. In a third person documentary following the events of that fateful day, it would be noted what happened in the classroom and pundits from both sides would offer their opinion of whether or not Bush was right in his decision to finish the story. Moore, as a first person filmmaker, with no interest in being objective, clearly implies he feels Bush was wrong.

The parts of Moore's documentaries that his supporters love and his detractors hate are usually the same parts. His supporters point to his arguments as sound critiques, while his detractors say those arguments are falsely argued. For instance, in another moment, Moore shows the president stating jovially that his political base is rich. Moore's supporters may agree with this cinematic decision. His detractors may point out that the "statement" was a joke at a press dinner, something Moore conveniently leaves out. And that is the problem that even Moore's supporters have with many of his films as well. Even when they agree with the core of Moore's arguments, or at least his beliefs, he muddies the waters by using slightly dishonest editing choices.

Still, Michael Moore has played a vastly important role in bringing documentaries into the modern age. Not only has Moore made it acceptable to put polemics at the center of documentary filmmaking, but he's made it successful as well. Moore has given birth to a new age of documentary filmmaking in which activists and polemicists across the world use film to make their point louder than any words ever could. The success of Roger and Me made the case that documentaries could make money and entertain large audiences. That entertainment comes from Moore's uncanny sense of how and when to mix comedy with the brutal reality of the subject at hand. Moore isn't always very serious, but it's through levity that he often makes his most trenchant arguments.

Fahrenheit 9/11 won the Oscar for Best Documentary and was the highest grossing documentary to ever take home the award. In fact, as of this writing, it is the highest grossing documentary ever, period. It also won the prestigious Palme d,Or at the Cannes Film Festival, something many had never expected of a documentary competing against fictional narrative works.

In the end, the arguments against Michael Moore probably miss the point. Moore is a polemicist making movies, not a movie maker who wants be a polemicist. When he's criticized for deceptive editing or leaving facts out, it misses the point that his intention is not to make an objective third person documentary, but a passionate first person one that states its case while never shying away from which side it believes is right. Does Fahrenheit 9/11 feel one-sided? Of course it does, that's the point. Michael Moore is making a documentary about what he believes should or should not have happened. Moore doesn't care if you like him or hate him. He just wants you to know where he stands.

Director: Michael Moore
Screenplay: Michael Moore
Cinematography: Urban Hamid
Art Direction: Dina Varano (uncredited)
Music: Jeff Gibbs
Film Editing: Kurt Engfehr, Woody Richman, Chris Seward
C-121m.

By Greg Ferrara
Fahrenheit 9/11 -

Fahrenheit 9/11 -

In 1989, Michael Moore changed the face of documentary filmmaking with his sensational documentary, Roger and Me. Moore made his own face, that is to say himself, the subject of all of his documentaries since. Whatever the subject matter at hand, the real subject of every Michael Moore documentary is Michael Moore. Whether this has changed documentary filmmaking for the better is decidedly up to the viewer. When one sees a movie by Michael Moore, one knows going in, or should at least, that what the documentary is really about is how Moore feels about the subject at hand, not the subject itself. And so, we arrive at just why Moore's documentaries are so controversial. On September 11th, 2001, the United States was deliberately and ruthlessly attacked by terrorists, killing thousands in an act that shocked and horrified the world. In the months that followed, new security measures were enacted, new acts were passed, and, in the years that followed, America committed to war in Afghanistan and Iraq in response. At least, that's the story that we were told but Michael Moore doesn't quite believe it. That fateful morning of September 11th is where Fahrenheit 9/11 begins. In the weeks after the attacks, the reaction of the president came into focus. He was doing a reading session at an elementary school in Sarasota, Florida when he was informed of the second attack on the World Trade Center. Some critics felt he should have abruptly left, but President Bush felt it was more important to keep the children calm until he knew more about what was going on. Michael Moore shows this event with a timer on the screen as we watch the president reading the book with the children. The implication being that the president took far too long to react than he should have because he was indecisive. And that is the Michael Moore signature. In a third person documentary following the events of that fateful day, it would be noted what happened in the classroom and pundits from both sides would offer their opinion of whether or not Bush was right in his decision to finish the story. Moore, as a first person filmmaker, with no interest in being objective, clearly implies he feels Bush was wrong. The parts of Moore's documentaries that his supporters love and his detractors hate are usually the same parts. His supporters point to his arguments as sound critiques, while his detractors say those arguments are falsely argued. For instance, in another moment, Moore shows the president stating jovially that his political base is rich. Moore's supporters may agree with this cinematic decision. His detractors may point out that the "statement" was a joke at a press dinner, something Moore conveniently leaves out. And that is the problem that even Moore's supporters have with many of his films as well. Even when they agree with the core of Moore's arguments, or at least his beliefs, he muddies the waters by using slightly dishonest editing choices. Still, Michael Moore has played a vastly important role in bringing documentaries into the modern age. Not only has Moore made it acceptable to put polemics at the center of documentary filmmaking, but he's made it successful as well. Moore has given birth to a new age of documentary filmmaking in which activists and polemicists across the world use film to make their point louder than any words ever could. The success of Roger and Me made the case that documentaries could make money and entertain large audiences. That entertainment comes from Moore's uncanny sense of how and when to mix comedy with the brutal reality of the subject at hand. Moore isn't always very serious, but it's through levity that he often makes his most trenchant arguments. Fahrenheit 9/11 won the Oscar for Best Documentary and was the highest grossing documentary to ever take home the award. In fact, as of this writing, it is the highest grossing documentary ever, period. It also won the prestigious Palme d,Or at the Cannes Film Festival, something many had never expected of a documentary competing against fictional narrative works. In the end, the arguments against Michael Moore probably miss the point. Moore is a polemicist making movies, not a movie maker who wants be a polemicist. When he's criticized for deceptive editing or leaving facts out, it misses the point that his intention is not to make an objective third person documentary, but a passionate first person one that states its case while never shying away from which side it believes is right. Does Fahrenheit 9/11 feel one-sided? Of course it does, that's the point. Michael Moore is making a documentary about what he believes should or should not have happened. Moore doesn't care if you like him or hate him. He just wants you to know where he stands. Director: Michael Moore Screenplay: Michael Moore Cinematography: Urban Hamid Art Direction: Dina Varano (uncredited) Music: Jeff Gibbs Film Editing: Kurt Engfehr, Woody Richman, Chris Seward C-121m. By Greg Ferrara

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Co-winner of the 2004 award for Freedom of Expression by the National Board of Review (NBR).

Winner of the 2004 award for Best Documentary by the Chicago Film Critics Association (CFCA).

Winner of the 2004 award for Best Documentary by the San Francisco Film Critics Circle (SFFCC).

Winner of the 2004 award for Best Documentary by the Washington DC Area Film Critics Association (WAFCA).

Winner of the 2004 award for Best Non-Fiction Film by the New York Film Critics Circle (NYFCC).

Winner of the Palme d'Or at the 2004 Cannes Film Festival.

Released in United States Summer June 23, 2004

Limited Release in United States June 25, 2004

Re-released in United States September 24, 2004

Released in United States on Video October 5, 2004

Released in United States June 2004

Shown at IFP/Los Angeles Film Festival June 17-26, 2004.

Icon Productions paid a sum of eight-figures plus potential backend to win a bidding war for the rights to this film.

Theatrical marketing and distribution handled through a joint venture between Lions Gate Films, IFC Films and Harvey and Bob Weinstein's Fellowship Adventure Group.

Icon Productions dropped out of the financing deal for the film.

Released in United States Summer June 23, 2004

Limited Release in United States June 25, 2004

Re-released in United States September 24, 2004 (re-issue)

Released in United States on Video October 5, 2004

Released in United States June 2004 (Shown at IFP/Los Angeles Film Festival June 17-26, 2004.)

Former programmer for the Castro Theatre