Baadasssss!


1h 48m 2004

Brief Synopsis

Melvin Van Peebles stunned the world for the first time, with his debut feature, "The Story of a Three Day Pass." Filmed in France and selected as the French entry in the San Francisco Film Festival, Melvin's film was awarded the top prize. Saying it was controversial would be an understatement. In

Film Details

Also Known As
Badass, Gettin' The Man's Foot Outta Your Ass And Other Life Lessons, Getting The Man's Foot Out Of Your Ass And Other Life Lessons, How to Get the Man's Foot Outta Your Ass
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2004
Production Company
Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment, Inc.; Cinelease, Inc.; Entertainment Partners; Hollywood Camera Cars; Hollywood Caterers; Ipostini; Laserpacific Media Corporation; Showtime Independent Films; Showtime Networks; Sony Pictures Scoring Stage; Studio Services; Truman Van Dyke; Wilcox Sound & Communications Inc
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Classics; British Film Institute; Sony Pictures Classics; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Synopsis

Melvin Van Peebles stunned the world for the first time, with his debut feature, "The Story of a Three Day Pass." Filmed in France and selected as the French entry in the San Francisco Film Festival, Melvin's film was awarded the top prize. Saying it was controversial would be an understatement. In 1968 for a black man to walk up to the podium and accept the top festival award for a film he had to go abroad to make--now that's how you make your mark. After his comedy, "Watermelon Man," Melvin was determined to push the Hollywood boundaries with the groundbreaking, and even more controversial, "Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song." Turned down by every major studio including Columbia, where he had a three-picture deal, Melvin was forced to basically self-finance. Risking everything he had Melvin delivered to the world the first Black Ghetto hero on the big screen--whether they were ready or not! More than 30 years later, history is being fashioned again in the telling of this very tale. Mario Van Peebles, Melvin's son, directs an honest and revealing portrait of his pioneering father. Mario now tells the story of the making of Melvin Van Peebles' landmark 1971 film, "Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song," including Melvin's struggles to raise money to fund the film under the guise of creating a black porno film. Melvin had ducked creditors, the unions and had to bail out his camera crew after they were arrested because a white cop decided "a bunch of Negroes and hippies couldn't have come by that camera equipment honestly." Despite death threats and temporarily losing sight in one eye, Melvin somehow managed to whip into shape a rag-tag, multi-racial crew and finish the film that would give birth to birth of a new era which was about to explode: Independent Black Cinema.

Crew

Tree Adams

Song Performer ("Damn All The Fallacies"), Song Performer ("Ope De Mar")

Erick Anderson

Wardrobe Assistant

Matthew Ballard

Transportation Coordinator

Tyler Bates

Composer

Tamu Blackwell

Second Second Assistant Director

Marty Boger

Company Grip

Luis Brito

Catering (Hollywood Caterers)

Amy Britt

Casting

Hennie Britton

Foley Recordist

Kassie Byrd

Wardrobe Intern

Martin Carlin

Studio Teacher

John Carlson

Digital Transfer Engineer

Tasha Monique Carter

On Set Costumer

Laura Cataldo

Casting Assistant

Chapman/leonard Studio Equipment, Inc.

Other

Patrick Clark

Post-Production Coordinator

Derrick Cloud

Boom Operator

William Coit

Location Manager

Laura Collier

Assistant Production Accountant

Anya Colloff

Casting

Benjamin Cook

Supervising Sound Editor

Niki J Crawford

Song ("I Wanna Touch Your Body"), Song ("Up & Down")

Niki J Crawford

Song Performer ("I Wanna Touch Your Body"), Song Performer ("Up & Down")

Paul Cuffee

Gaffer

Paul Demers

Foley Assistant

Andre Devantier

Catering (Hollywood Caterers)

Ian Dodd

"A" Camera Operator

Rex Dominguez

Production Assistant

Kokeeta Douglas

Makeup Designer

Kokeeta Douglas

Hair Stylist

Kevin Dreher

Production Assistant

Phil Eisenhower

Studio Teacher

Jena English

Research

Julius Fletcher

Driver

Guy Flint

Studio Teacher

Dale Franz

Script Supervisor

Alan Freedman

Adr Mixer

Jose Garcia

Consultant

Frank Gardner

Best Boy Grip

Mark S Garrett

Driver

Robert Getty

Dialogue Editor

Paul C Gibilisco

Second Assistant Camera

Bruce Gillies

Line Producer

Bruce Gillies

Second Unit Director

Mimi Gillies

Production Coordinator

Nneka Goforth

Editor

Jorge Gonzalez Borzelli

Art Director

Kristina Granai

Craft Service Assistant

Stephanie Granai

Craft Service

Dennis Haggerty

Screenwriter

Dennis Haggerty

Co-Producer

Tobie Haggerty

Co-Executive Producer

Freeman Hardin

Electrician

Pat Harris

Assistant Hair Stylist

Pat Harris

Assistant Makeup

Beverly Hartigan

Special Effects (Ultimate Effects)

John Hartigan

Special Effects (Ultimate Effects)

Jameel Hassan

Song Performer ("Getting The Man'S Good Outta Your Baadasssss!")

Mark Henderson

Art Department Intern

Jennifer Hill

Animal Wrangler

Adam Hirsch

Song ("Damn All The Fallacies"), Song ("Ope De Mar"), Song ("I Wanna Touch Your Body"), Song ("Up & Down")

Frederick Howard

Sound Effects Editor

Bob Hummel

Assistant Property Master

Kevin Hummel

Swing Gang

Craig Jurkiewicz

Sound Effects Editor

Michael P Keeping

Foley Artist

Meica Kelly

Office Production Assistant

Kaiser Ki-pyo Kim

Electrician

Tim King

Post-Production Executive

Dan Kneece

"B" Camera Steadicam Operator

Kim Koscki

Stunt Coordinator

Ryan Kriss

Swing Gang

Craig Kuehne

Visual Effects Compositor

Kanchan Kurichh

Production Assistant

Dave Kustin

Assistant Sound Editor

Albert Lanutti

Special Effects (Bang Fx)

Robert Lewis

Location Assistant

Dana Macduff

Property Master

Michael Mann

Executive Producer

Steven Mann

First Assistant "B" Camera

Johnny Martin

Key Grip

Michael Matis

Medic

Keana Mcgee

Assistant Production Coordinator

Jaime Mejia

Production Assistant

Amy Melendez

Post-Production Assistant

Jay Melzer

Digital Editor

Jeff Millcheck

Production Assistant

Anthony Miller

Editor

Les Miller

Assistant (To Mr Van Peebles)

Skip Mobley

Second Assistant Camera

Alan Muraoka

Production Designer

Bobbie Nanfito

Animal Wrangler

Nathan Novero

Assistant Editor

Michael O'connor

Still Photographer

Shonta Odom

Office Intern

Jerry Offsay

Executive Producer

Tom Overton

Colorist

Stella Pacific

Studio Teacher

Gregory Pacificar

Production Assistant

Chris Parker

Music Coordinator

Chris Parker

Music Clearances

David Parker

Sound Mixer

Shona Peters

Best Boy Electric

Jeffrey Powers

Graphic Artist

Robert Primes

Director Of Photography

Denise Pugh-ruiz

Makeup

Denise Pugh-ruiz

Hair Stylist

Galit Reuben

Set Decorator

Robert C Rodriguez

Assistant Editor

Robert C Rodriguez

Hd On-Line Editor

Ann Rosencrans

Best Boy Electric

G Marq Roswell

Co-Producer

G Marq Roswell

Music Supervisor

Anjoli Rountree

Production Assistant

Raul Sanchez

Animal Wrangler

Tanya Sanchez

Wardrobe Supervisor

Kara Saun

Costume Designer

Jason Schmid

Rerecording Mixer

Jessica Shannon

Production Accountant

Sabrina Sipantzi Ballard

Medic

Anne-marie Slack

Sound Effects Editor

Brian Slack

Rerecording Mixer

Roni Spitzer

Art Department Buyer

Michael Stahlberg

Assistant Editor

Mark Starr

Assistant Hair Stylist

Mark Starr

Assistant Makeup

Adam Swart

Music Clearances

Adam Swart

Music Coordinator

Michael Thomas

Office Intern

Omari Thomas

Electrician

Garth Trinidad

Music Supervisor

Gary Katsuya Ushino

First Assistant Camera

Michael Valenzuela

Company Grip

Truman Van Dyke

Insurance Company

Mario Van Peebles

Lyrics ("Getting The Man'S Good Outta Your Baadasssss!")

Mario Van Peebles

Producer

Mario Van Peebles

Screenwriter

Melvin Van Peebles

Source Material (From Book: "Sweet Sweetback'S Baadasssss Song")

Tom Vice

Account Service Representative

Tal Vigderson

Co-Producer

Charles Winzer

Company Grip

Jason Wood

Electrician

Film Details

Also Known As
Badass, Gettin' The Man's Foot Outta Your Ass And Other Life Lessons, Getting The Man's Foot Out Of Your Ass And Other Life Lessons, How to Get the Man's Foot Outta Your Ass
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2004
Production Company
Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment, Inc.; Cinelease, Inc.; Entertainment Partners; Hollywood Camera Cars; Hollywood Caterers; Ipostini; Laserpacific Media Corporation; Showtime Independent Films; Showtime Networks; Sony Pictures Scoring Stage; Studio Services; Truman Van Dyke; Wilcox Sound & Communications Inc
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Classics; British Film Institute; Sony Pictures Classics; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Articles

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)


American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57.

He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts.

But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children.

by Michael T. Toole
Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)

American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57. He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts. But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children. by Michael T. Toole

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)


Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87.

He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama.

As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day.

Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops.

Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948.

With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade.

However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing.

If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church.

Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969).

In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater.

Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997).

Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk.

In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)

Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87. He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama. As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day. Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops. Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948. With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade. However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing. If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church. Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969). In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater. Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997). Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk. In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer May 28, 2004

Released in United States on Video September 14, 2004

Released in United States January 2004

Released in United States May 2004

Shown at Tribeca Film Festival May 1-9, 2004.

Sony Pictures Classics acquired North American and Latin American distribution rights at the 2003 Toronto International Festival.

Kodak

Released in United States Summer May 28, 2004 (NY, LA)

Released in United States on Video September 14, 2004

Released in United States January 2004 (Shown at Sundance Film Festival (Premieres) January 15-25, 2004.)

Released in United States May 2004 (Shown at Tribeca Film Festival May 1-9, 2004.)