My House in Umbria


2h 2003

Brief Synopsis

Based on the story by William Trevor about a romance writer who lives in Italy, survives after a terrorist's bomb in her train in Italy. She finds solace by inviting the survivors to stay at her home in Umbria to recover. One of the victims is a young girl who is severly traumatized by the explosion

Film Details

Release Date
2003
Production Company
Fabrizio Ferrari
Location
Siena, Italy; Shepperton Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom; Tuscany, Italy; Cinecitta Studios, Italy; San Casciano, Italy; Twickenham Film Studios, London, England, United Kingdom; Rome, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Synopsis

Based on the story by William Trevor about a romance writer who lives in Italy, survives after a terrorist's bomb in her train in Italy. She finds solace by inviting the survivors to stay at her home in Umbria to recover. One of the victims is a young girl who is severly traumatized by the explosions and when her father arrives to take her back to America, problems arise.

Crew

Daniele Abeille

Transportation Manager

Abdellaziz Abidi

Construction

Robert Allan Ackerman

Executive Producer

Christopher Ackland

Supervising Sound Editor

Daniel Acon

Special Effects Supervisor

Hugo Adams

Assistant Sound Editor

Renato Agostini

Special Effects Technician

Gerardo Alberto

Location Coordinator

Lucy Allen

Stunt Performer

Marc Allen

Production Assistant

Palmiro Aloi

Carpenter

Maxwell Anderson

Song

Riccardo Andreotti

Painter

Antonio Angiuoli

Driver

Damiano Antinori

Sound Mixer

Philippe Antonello

Photography

Giorgio Antonini

Stunt Performer

Angela Anzimani

Wardrobe

Maria Apodiacos

Script Supervisor

Enrico Appetito

Photography

Luciana Arrighi

Production Designer

Johnny Ash

Electrician

Carlo Avvisato

Props

Simone Balestrini

Generator Operator

Marzio Bardi

Assistant Property Master

Ben Barker

Assistant Sound Editor

Emanuele Barretta

Driver

Simona Batistelli

Production Secretary

Angela Beale

Wardrobe

Jonny Benson

Assistant Director

Maria Graciela Bernal

Production Coordinator

Leonardo Bertini

Set Production Assistant

Angus Bickerton

Visual Effects Designer

Riccardo Biseo

Original Music

Antonio Blandino

Construction

Steve Boag

Digital Effects Supervisor

Cesare Botta

Music

Filippo Brachi

Construction

Maurizio Broglio

Electrician

Luigi Buldrini

Driver

Martin Bullard

Digital Effects

Johnny Burke

Song

Giuseppe Cafagna

Painter

Enzo Calera

Driver

Ciro Calo

Driver

Aurelio Calzuola

Greensman

Billy Campbell

Visual Effects Editor

Renzo Cantini

Production

Fausto Capozzi

Production Accountant

Claudio Capponi

Music

Maria Rosaria Caracciolo

Casting

Mariano Carbonato

Production Secretary

Matteo Carlesimo

Camera Focus Puller

Alberto Carmellini

Security

Leonardo Carnaroli

Security

Neil Carr

Motion Control

Chiara Cecili

Painter

Cristina Cecili

Painter

Ray Charles

Song Performer

Aldo Chessari

Camera Operator

Aaron Chetwynd

Art Director

Graham Churchyard

Wardrobe Supervisor

Stefano Ciammetti

Driver

Gary Clark

Driver

Mark Clark

Best Boy

Nobby Clarke

Rigging Grip

Rory J Collins

Art Department

Ed Colyer

Adr Mixer

Mike Connolly

Digital Effects Artist

Giovanni Consigli

Art Department

Giorgio Conti

Assistant Editor

Desideria Corridoni

Hairdresser

Maria Teresa Corridoni

Hairdresser

Giovanni Cosi

Driver

Felicity Cottrell

Foley Artist

Simon Cozens

Assistant Editor

Emily Craig

Casting Assistant

Mario Cristofanelli

Special Effects Technician

Bing Crosby

Song Performer

Antonino Cucillo

Driver

Luciano Curti

Painter

Matt Curtis

Titles

Davide D'ambrosi

Stunt Performer

Raymond Day

Carpenter

Cecilia Dazzi

Song

Cecilia Dazzi

Song Performer

Roberto De Angelis

Steadicam Operator

Maria De Los Angeles Parrinello

Costume Department

Anna De Santis

Hairdresser

Claudio De Simone

Production Assistant

Flavio De Simone

Cashier

Helen De Winter

Rights & Clearances

Massimo Dechellis

Electrician

Fabiomassimo Dell'orco

Production Manager

Valentino Della Posta

Carpenter

Alessandro Macchi Di Cellere

Assistant Location Manager

Romano Di Chio

Carpenter

Marco Di Francesco

Driver

Franco Di Tivoli

Driver

Roberto Diamanti

Grip

Humphrey Dixon

Editor

Frank Doelger

Executive Producer

Francis B K Dokyi

Driver

Cristiano Donzelli

Storyboard Artist

Mike Dowson

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

John Eccleston

Production Accountant

Harry Eckford

Grip

Steve Ede

Carpenter

Louis Elman

Voice Casting

Roy Elston

Motion Control

Mark English

Hair Stylist

Nicoletta Ercole

Costume Designer

Sergio Ercolessi

Assistant Director

Sandro Ercolini

Painter

Amaia Etxeberria

Assistant Production Accountant

Perry Evans

Gaffer

Emanuele Fanetti

Security

Robert Farr

Adr Mixer

John Ferguson

Camera Focus Puller

Fabrizio Ferrari

Cable Operator

Mauro Fiori

Art Department

Fleur Fontaine

Production Coordinator

Dettmer Forsyth-graffam

Production

Eugenio Fortuna

Driver

Ken Fox

Stunt Performer

Ludovico Fulci

Original Music

Giancarlo Gabrielli

Greensman

Ruggero Gamba

Props Buyer

Erroll Garner

Song

Bill Geddes

Dolly Grip

Roberto Gentili

Camera Focus Puller

Giuliano Ghiselli

Production

David Gibbons

Digital Effects Artist

Annie Gilhooly

Props Buyer

Fabrizio Giorgio

Driver

Angelo Giovagnoli

Score Recording

Christian Giuliani

Assistant Production Coordinator

Gabriele Gorga

Electrician

Natasha Gormley

Production Coordinator

Magdalena Paula Grassi

Costume Department

Darren Grosch

Electrician

Michael Hannan

Loader

Peter Hannan

Director Of Photography

John Hardwick

Digital Effects Artist

Fred Harris

Camera

Steve Harrow

Production Consultant

Gordon Hayman

Camera Operator

Toby Hefferman

Assistant Director

Barrie Hemsley

Visual Effects Producer

Lee Herrick

Dialogue Editor

Richard Hewitt

Assistant Director

Tim Hey

Digital Effects Artist

Darren Holland

Grip

Kevin Holt

Assistant Editor

Sarah Hunt

Assistant Production Accountant

Ivory Joe Hunter

Song

Robert Irvine

Painter

David James

Photography

Daniel John

Assistant Director

Leo Johns

Song

Chris Johnstone

Digital Effects Artist

Malcolm Keane

Painter

Sabine Kertscher

Special Effects

Duncan Kinnaird

Digital Effects Artist

Evyen Klean

Music Supervisor

Massimiliano Kuveiller

Loader

Antonio La Barbera

Electrician

Giacomo Lacerenza

Grip

Irene Lamb

Casting Director

Alessio Lampazzi

Grip

Enrico Latella

Location Manager

Federico Laurenti

Makeup Artist

Simon Leech

Digital Effects Artist

Herbert Leventhal

Song

Luigi Lombari

Driver

Iain Lowe

Rigging Grip

Fabrizio Lozzi

Driver

Maurizio Lurci

Location Coordinator

Duccio Maccari

Loader

Andrew Macleod

Digital Effects Artist

Fabrizio Marangolo

Driver

Michelangelo Marchini

Generator Operator

Tamara Marini

Assistant Art Director

Venanzio Marsili

Set Production Assistant

Dean Martin

Song Performer

Kevin Mathews

Motion Control

Marco Mattei

Accounting Assistant

Marco Maurizi

Location Coordinator

Mauro Mazzarini

Driver

Keiron Mcnamara

Property Master

Maria Erminia Melato

Wardrobe Supervisor

Giacoma A Mellini

Wardrobe

Johnny Mercer

Song

Karin Mercurio

Accountant

Franco Micheli

Grip

Luciano Micheli

Grip

Riccardo Mioni

Stunt Performer

Stefano Mioni

Stunt Performer

Daniele Modesti

Assistant Location Manager

Marco Moneta

Special Effects Technician

Film Details

Release Date
2003
Production Company
Fabrizio Ferrari
Location
Siena, Italy; Shepperton Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom; Tuscany, Italy; Cinecitta Studios, Italy; San Casciano, Italy; Twickenham Film Studios, London, England, United Kingdom; Rome, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Articles

Ronnie Barker (1929-2005)


Ronnie Barker, the British comic actor whose portly physique and jovial demeanor made him a star on British television and film through five decades, died on October 3 at his home in Oxfordshire, England after enduring a long battle with heart disease. He was 76.

He was born Ronald William George Barker in Bedford, England on September 25, 1929 and raised in Oxford. Educated at the City of Oxford High School, he took a job as a clerk at Westminster Bank, all the while harboring dreams of becoming an actor.

He was offered his first break in 1948 when he joined the Manchester Repertory Company. His roles were small, but for a starry-eyed 19-year-old it could not have been more fascinating. Three years later, he joined the Oxford Playhouse where he gained more experience, particularly in comedy, and in 1955, director Peter Hall gave him his first big opportunity at the famed Arts Theatre in London, where he worked steadily and developed his craft over the next several years.

After some success on BBC radio, Barker moved into films. His parts were small, but his comic timing and avuncular mannerism made him memorable in some sharp comedies: the little known Terry Thomas gem Kill or Cure (1962); a put-upon customer at a railway station in Doctor in Distress (1963); his first prominent film role as doleful sad sack in The Bargee (1964); and a cameo in the pleasant if harmless family outing Runaway Railway (1965).

Yet his achievements in film paled in comparison to his success on television, which would prove to be Barker's calling card. In 1966, commentator David Frost would hire him (along with Ronnie Corbett and John Cleese) for The Frost Report, a wildly popular revue show that would satirize the popular fads and political situations of the day. From there, he moved onto Frost on Sunday the following year which was also hit. Not coincidentally, his good fortune on television led to improved film parts: a dramatic turn in a spy thriller starring veteran character actor Van Heflin The Man Outside (1967); and as a ghost who tries to help young children save a historical landmark in Ghost of a Chance (1968).

Still, his success up to this point was marginal when compared to the golden stride he hit in the '70s. He starred in no less than three hit series that decade: the popular sketch comedy opposite Ronnie Corbett in The Two Ronnies (1971-1987); the endearing prison sitcom Porridge (1973-1977); and as a frugal Northern shopkeeper with a penchant for stammering in Open All Hours (1973-1985). All three of these programs had developed a huge cult following in America over the years due to their screening on public television, and it's safe to say that Barker was, if not an international star, a very welcome talent and presence to million of fans worldwide.

This decade would also contain his most lauded film performance - that of Friar Tuck in Richard Lester's Robin and Marian (1976), co-starring Sean Connery and Audrey Hepburn. Barker offered a cheeky take on this established character with just the right touch of pathos, making him an essential component to this robust adventure film. Oddly, despite his good critical notices, he made only one more film that decade, a full theatrical feature based on his television series, Porridge (1979).

Barker was still a popular fixture in British entertainment when he semi-retired in 1987. He spent most of his time operating an antique shop in the Oxfordshire village of Chipping Norton, but he was always coaxed back for an occasional appearance, the most impressive by far were his two serio-comic turns in The Gathering Storm (2002), playing the wise manservant to Albert Finney's Winston Churchill; and the HBO special My House in Umbria (2003), a moving portrayal as a retired general maintaining his wit and dignity after tragic circumstances opposite Dame Maggie Smith. Barker is survived by his wife of 48 years, Joy; a daughter, Charlotte; and sons, Adam and Larry.

by Michael T. Toole
Ronnie Barker (1929-2005)

Ronnie Barker (1929-2005)

Ronnie Barker, the British comic actor whose portly physique and jovial demeanor made him a star on British television and film through five decades, died on October 3 at his home in Oxfordshire, England after enduring a long battle with heart disease. He was 76. He was born Ronald William George Barker in Bedford, England on September 25, 1929 and raised in Oxford. Educated at the City of Oxford High School, he took a job as a clerk at Westminster Bank, all the while harboring dreams of becoming an actor. He was offered his first break in 1948 when he joined the Manchester Repertory Company. His roles were small, but for a starry-eyed 19-year-old it could not have been more fascinating. Three years later, he joined the Oxford Playhouse where he gained more experience, particularly in comedy, and in 1955, director Peter Hall gave him his first big opportunity at the famed Arts Theatre in London, where he worked steadily and developed his craft over the next several years. After some success on BBC radio, Barker moved into films. His parts were small, but his comic timing and avuncular mannerism made him memorable in some sharp comedies: the little known Terry Thomas gem Kill or Cure (1962); a put-upon customer at a railway station in Doctor in Distress (1963); his first prominent film role as doleful sad sack in The Bargee (1964); and a cameo in the pleasant if harmless family outing Runaway Railway (1965). Yet his achievements in film paled in comparison to his success on television, which would prove to be Barker's calling card. In 1966, commentator David Frost would hire him (along with Ronnie Corbett and John Cleese) for The Frost Report, a wildly popular revue show that would satirize the popular fads and political situations of the day. From there, he moved onto Frost on Sunday the following year which was also hit. Not coincidentally, his good fortune on television led to improved film parts: a dramatic turn in a spy thriller starring veteran character actor Van Heflin The Man Outside (1967); and as a ghost who tries to help young children save a historical landmark in Ghost of a Chance (1968). Still, his success up to this point was marginal when compared to the golden stride he hit in the '70s. He starred in no less than three hit series that decade: the popular sketch comedy opposite Ronnie Corbett in The Two Ronnies (1971-1987); the endearing prison sitcom Porridge (1973-1977); and as a frugal Northern shopkeeper with a penchant for stammering in Open All Hours (1973-1985). All three of these programs had developed a huge cult following in America over the years due to their screening on public television, and it's safe to say that Barker was, if not an international star, a very welcome talent and presence to million of fans worldwide. This decade would also contain his most lauded film performance - that of Friar Tuck in Richard Lester's Robin and Marian (1976), co-starring Sean Connery and Audrey Hepburn. Barker offered a cheeky take on this established character with just the right touch of pathos, making him an essential component to this robust adventure film. Oddly, despite his good critical notices, he made only one more film that decade, a full theatrical feature based on his television series, Porridge (1979). Barker was still a popular fixture in British entertainment when he semi-retired in 1987. He spent most of his time operating an antique shop in the Oxfordshire village of Chipping Norton, but he was always coaxed back for an occasional appearance, the most impressive by far were his two serio-comic turns in The Gathering Storm (2002), playing the wise manservant to Albert Finney's Winston Churchill; and the HBO special My House in Umbria (2003), a moving portrayal as a retired general maintaining his wit and dignity after tragic circumstances opposite Dame Maggie Smith. Barker is survived by his wife of 48 years, Joy; a daughter, Charlotte; and sons, Adam and Larry. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated for the 2004 David L. Wolper Producer of the Year Award (Long-Form Television) by the Producers Guild of America (PGA).

Winner of the 2003 Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie (Maggie Smith) from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Also nominated for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie (Chris Cooper), Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special (Richard Loncraine), Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special (Hugh Whitemore), Outstanding Made for Television Movie, Outstanding Art Direction for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special (Luciana Arrighi, Maria Cristina Onori, and Alessandra Querzola), Outstanding Casting for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special (Irene Lamb), and Outstanding Costumes for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special (Nicoletta Ercole, Rosa Palma, and Maria Erminia Melato).

Aired in United States May 25, 2003

Aired in United States November 25, 2003

Aired in United States May 2003

Shown at Tribeca Film Festival in New York City (Special Screenings) May 3-11, 2003.