De-Lovely


2h 5m 2004

Brief Synopsis

A musical portrait of American composer Cole Porter in which the musician looks back on his life as if it was one of his spectacular stage shows, with the people and events of his life becoming the actors and action onstage. Through elaborate production numbers Porter's elegant, excessive past comes

Film Details

Also Known As
Just One of Those Things
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2004
Production Company
Afm Lighting; Air Studios, London; BerkleeNYC; Cutting Edge Australia; Digital Sound & Pictures; Electric Picture Solutions; Hothouse Music; Laserpacific Media Corporation; Mad Dog Casting; Mcdonald & Rutter; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Midnight Transfer; Nt Video; Panavision, Ltd.; Potboiler Productions; Sassoon Film Design; Sassoon Film Design; Sony Pictures Scoring Stage; United Artists Films; Winkler Films
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM ); 20th Century Fox International; Filmcompagniet; Fs Film Oy; Hispano Foxfilms; MGM Distribution Company; MGM Home Entertainment; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
London, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m

Synopsis

A musical portrait of American composer Cole Porter in which the musician looks back on his life as if it was one of his spectacular stage shows, with the people and events of his life becoming the actors and action onstage. Through elaborate production numbers Porter's elegant, excessive past comes to light--including his deeply complicated relationship with his wife and muse, Linda Lee Porter.

Cast

Kevin Kline

Cole Porter

Ashley Judd

Linda Porter

Jonathan Pryce

Gabe

Kevin Mcnally

Gerald Murphy

Sandra Nelson

Sara Murphy

Allan Corduner

Monty Woolley

Peter Polycarpou

Louis B Mayer

Keith Allen

Irving Berlin

James Wilby

Edward Thomas

Kevin Mckidd

Bobby Reed

Richard Dillane

Bill Wrather

Edward Baker-duly

Boris Kochno

Angie Hill

Ellin Berlin

Harry Ditson

Dr Moorhead

Tayler Hamilton

Honoria Murphy

Lexie Peel

Patrick Murphy

Greg Sheffield

Boath Murphy

Peter Jessop

Diaghilev

Jeff Harding

Cody

Susannah Fellows

Mrs L B Mayer

Teddy Kempner

Stage Manager

Cole Porter

Musical Performer ("You'Re The Top")

Robbie Williams

Musical Performer ("It'S De-Lovely")

Lemar Obika

Musical Performer ("What Is This Thing Called Love?")

Elvis Costello

Musical Performer ("Let'S Misbehave")

Alanis Morissette

Musical Performer ("Let'S Do It, Let'S Fall In Love")

John Barrowman

Musical Performer ("Night And Day")

Caroline O'connor

Musical Performer ("Anything Goes")

Sheryl Crow

Musical Performer ("Begin The Beguine")

Mick Hucknall

Musical Performer ("I Love You")

Diana Krall

Musical Performer ("Just One Of Those Things")

Vivian Green

Musical Performer ("Love For Sale")

Lara Fabian

Musical Performer ("So In Love")

Mario Frangoulis

Musical Performer ("So In Love")

Natalie Cole

Musical Performer ("Ev'Ry Time We Say Goodbye")

Julian Cannonier

Chorus

Elizabeth Cooper Gee

Chorus

Jacob Chapman

Chorus

Cavin Cornwall

Chorus

Matt Dempsey

Chorus

Heather Douglas

Chorus

Jonathan D Ellis

Chorus

Jane Fowler

Chorus

Jason Gardiner

Chorus

Charlotte Gorton

Chorus

Nic Greenshields

Chorus

Akiya Henry

Chorus

Steve Lawton

Chorus

Duncan Macvicar

Chorus

Karen Mcsween

Chorus

Michelle Mcsween

Chorus

Dale Mercer

Chorus

Samantha Modeste

Chorus

Odette Perdrisat

Chorus

Thern Reynolds

Chorus

Rachel Stanley

Chorus

Oliver Thornton

Chorus

Claire Winsper

Chorus

David Arch

Performer

Ralph Salmins

Performer

Mitch Dalton

Performer

Alec Dankworth

Performer

Frank Ricotti

Performer

Gavyn Wright

Performer

Phil Todd

Performer

Andy Findon

Performer

Jamie Talbot

Performer

Ray Swinfield

Performer

Derek Watkins

Performer

Richard Edwards

Performer

Jenny O'grady

Performer

Cathy Jayes

Performer

Crew

John Bailie

First Assistant "B" Camera

Eddie Baker

Stand-By Props

Jason Barnoski

Post-Production Assistant

Libbie Barr

Script Supervisor

John Barrowman

Song ("Night And Day")

Becky Bentham

Music Coordinator (Hot House Music Ltd)

Carlie Bergman

Adr

Charlie Bergman

Adr Recordist

Jacqueline Bhavnani

Makeup Artist

Phil Bodger

Music Recording

Phil Bodger

Music Mixing

Ashley Bond

First Assistant "A" Camera

David Boulton

Adr Mixer

Felicity Bowring

Makeup Artist (For Ashley Judd)

Danielle Brandon

Unit Production Manager

Alan David Briant

Props Storeman

Claire Broughton

Assistant (To Gail Egan)

Alex Brown

Transportation Captain (Luxembourg Unit)

Chris Brown

Visual Effects Supervisor

Daniel Brown

Transportation Captain

Peter Brown

Location Assistant (Luxembourg Unit)

Chorley Bunce

Catering

John Bush

Set Decorator

Richard Carroll

Second Assistant "A" Camera

Simon Channing-williams

Executive Producer

Ronni Chasen

Press Representative

Dorian Cheah

Sound Effects Editor

Gary Chester

Additional Recording

Rosalie Clayton

Casting Assistant

Jay Cocks

Screenwriter

Natalie Cole

Song Performer ("Every Time We Say Goodbye")

Anne Collis

On Set Music Contractor

Mark Collisson

Construction Manager

Elvis Costello

Song Performer ("Let'S Misbehave")

Rob Cowan

Producer

Alex Cox

Stunt Player

Christopher Craig

Board Operator

Cheryl Cravedi

Costumer (To Ashley Judd)

Andrea Cripps

Assistant Costume Designer

Lee Croucher

Stand-By Costumer

Sheryl Crow

Song Performer ("Begin The Beguine")

Mark Crowley

Driver (For Ashley Judd)

June Czerwinski

Associate (For Winkler Films)

Gary Davies

Stand-By Stagehand

Zack Davis

Adr Editor

Ennio Disantolo

Assistant Lighting Technician

Mick Durlacher

Rigging Lighting Technician (Luxembourg Unit)

Mandy Edwards

Office Production Assistant

Gail Egan

Executive Producer

Stephen Endelman

Music Arranger

Stephen Endelman

Music Producer

Lara Fabian

Song Performer ("So In Love"), Song Performer ("Another Openin', Another Show")

Jo Farrugia

Assistant (To Irwin Winkler)

Tommy Finch

Chief Lighting Technician

Steve Finn

Boom Operator

Nick Foley

Adr Recordist

Gary Fox

Stand-By Props

Simon Frame

Visual Effects Supervisor

Mario Frangoulis

Song Performer ("So In Love")

Tim Fraser

Production Sound Mixer

Brian Gallagher

Adr Recordist

Becca Gatrell

Music Coordinator (Hot House Music Ltd)

Nina Gold

Casting

Gil Goldstein

Additional Arrangements

Gil Goldstein

Piano Coach (To Kevin Kline)

Gil Goldstein

Song Performer ("I Love Paris")

Selina Gomeau

Assistant (To Irwin Winkler)

Andrew T Grant

Assistant Art Director

Vivian Green

Song Performer ("Love For Sale")

Nic Greenshields

Song Performer ("Why Shouldn'T I?")

Isobel Griffiths

Music Contractor

Lee Grumett

Third Assistant Director

John Hagenstede

Sound Assistant

Tayler Hamilton

Song Performer ("True Love")

Jennifer Hatton

First Assistant Editor

Ellen Heuer

Foley Mixer

David Higgs

Base Runner

John Hill

Art Director

Alice Hobden

Second Assistant "B" Camera

Stuart Howell

"A" Camera Operator

Mick Hucknall

Song Performer ("I Love You")

Andrew Hunt

Stand-By Costumer

Gary Hymns

"B" Camera Grip

Francesca Jaynes

Choreographer

Dan John

Second Assistant Director

Ashley Judd

Song Performer ("In The Still Of The Night"), Song Performer ("Well Did You Evah!"), Song Performer ("True Love")

Michael Keller

Rerecording Mixer

Christopher Kennedy

Music Editor

Ian Kilsby

Personal Security

Kevin Kline

Song Performer ("In The Still Of The Night"), Song Performer ("Weren'T We Fools"), Song Performer ("Well Did You Evah!"), Song Performer ("Easy To Love"), Song Performer ("What Is This Thing Called Love"), Song Performer ("Be A Clown"), Song Performer ("Night And Day"), Song Performer ("Experiment"), Song Performer ("It'S All Right With Me"), Song Performer ("Get Out Of Town"), Song Performer ("Goodbye, Little Dream, Goodbye"), Song Performer ("You'Re The Top"), Song Performer ("So In Love"), Song Performer ("Blow, Gabriel, Blow")

Sonny Kompanek

Additional Music Preparation

Sonny Kompanek

Additional Arrangements

Josef Kowalewski

Assistant Costume Supervisor

Diana Krall

Song Performer ("I Get A Kick Out Of You"), Song Performer ("Just One Of Those Things")

Martin Lane

Stand-By Painter

Neil Lee

Location Manager

Jo Littlejohn

Construction Coordinator

Graham Longhurst

Special Effects Coordinator

Georgina Lowe

Line Producer

Andrew Maclean

Assistant Accountant

Sarah Mcbryde

Production Coordinator

Leon Mccarthy

Stand-By Carpenter

Caitlin Mckenna

Adr Voice Casting

Kevin Mcnally

Song Performer ("Weren'T We Fools"), Song Performer ("Well Did You Evah!")

Simon Mein

Still Photographer

Carey Milbradt

Foley Editor

Carey Milbradt

Foley Mixer

Beth Miller

Hair Stylist (For Ashley Judd)

Justin Miller

Assistant Accountant

Richard Mills

Property Master

Nic Milner

"B" Camera Operator

Julie Milstead

Associate (To The Producers)

Julie Monroe

Editor

Sarah Monzani

Makeup Designer

Alanis Morissette

Song Performer ("Let'S Do It, Let'S Fall In Love")

Sophie Moss

Assistant Production Coordinator

Doug Murray

Adr Mixer

Gerard Naprous

Horse Stunt Coordinator

Chris Navarro

Adr Recordist

Sandra Nelson

Song Performer ("Well Did You Evah!")

Gary Norden

Vocal Coach (To Kevin Kline)

Caroline O'connor

Song Performer ("Anything Goes")

Andy Ormesher

Stand-By Rigger

Jack Paulson

Assistant Editor

Leonora Penglase

Assistant (To Simon Channing Williams)

Tony Pierce-roberts

Director Of Photography

Ian Pollington

On Set Location Manager

Peter Polycarpou

Song Performer ("Be A Clown")

Cole Porter

Music

Cole Porter

Song Performer ("You'Re The Top")

Cole Porter

Lyrics

Andy Potvin

Dolby Sound Consultant

Graham Pownall

Hair Stylist

Darren Price

Key Set Production Assistant

Jonathan Pryce

Song Performer ("Blow, Gabriel, Blow")

Darren Quinn

Key Grip

Maggie Rawlinson

Assistant Choreographer

Tom Read

Stand-By Art Director

Dave Rees

Color Timer

Joanne Reichling

Production Coordinator (Luxembourg Unit)

Josh Robertson

First Assistant Director

John Ross

Supervising Sound Editor

John Ross

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Geoffrey G. Rubay

Sound Effects Editor

Jonathan Rutter

Publicity

Valerie Scheil

Extras Casting (Luxembourg Unit)

Joy Scott

Third Assistant Director

Aaron Sherman

Prosthetic Makeup

Maralyn Sherman

Prosthetic Makeup

Nick Shuttleworth

Crowd Second Assistant Director

Sunita Singh

Stand-By Costumer

Basil Smith

Second Assistant "A" Camera

Michael Solinger

Post-Production Supervisor

Walter Spencer

Dialogue Editor

Clare Spragge

Costume Supervisor

Michael Standish

Production Buyer

Eve Stewart

Production Designer

Graham Stickley

Props Storeman

Ted Swanscott

Adr Mixer

Eric Thompson

Adr Mixer

Simon Thompson

Hair Designer

Will Towers

Boom Operator

Will Tyler

Production Accountant

Doug Vale

First Aid

Peter Versey

"B" Camera Operator

Ed Walsh

Draughtsman

Drew Webster

Digital Mix Technician

Tracie Wetherill

Video Assist

George White

Rigging Lighting Technician

Mark Williams

Driver (For Kevin Kline)

Robbie Williams

Song Performer ("It'S De-Lovely")

Rhona Wilson

Assistant Buyer

Julia Wilson-dickson

Dialect Coach (To Ashley Judd)

Charles Winkler

Second Unit Director

Charles Winkler

Producer

Irwin Winkler

Producer

Vanessa Woolgar

Crowd Dresser

Henry Woolley

Assistant Location Manager

Janty Yates

Costume Designer

Clara Y Zhu

Assistant Sound Editor

Robert Ziegler

Music Conductor

Film Details

Also Known As
Just One of Those Things
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2004
Production Company
Afm Lighting; Air Studios, London; BerkleeNYC; Cutting Edge Australia; Digital Sound & Pictures; Electric Picture Solutions; Hothouse Music; Laserpacific Media Corporation; Mad Dog Casting; Mcdonald & Rutter; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Midnight Transfer; Nt Video; Panavision, Ltd.; Potboiler Productions; Sassoon Film Design; Sassoon Film Design; Sony Pictures Scoring Stage; United Artists Films; Winkler Films
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM ); 20th Century Fox International; Filmcompagniet; Fs Film Oy; Hispano Foxfilms; MGM Distribution Company; MGM Home Entertainment; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
London, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m

Articles

Remaking a Legend: De-Lovely, a new screen biography of Cole Porter


It's true. The two screen biographies of Cole Porter's life are as different as Night and Day. The original film, under the latter title, was released in 1946 and starred Cary Grant. That was an interesting casting decision since Cole Porter was gay, but happily married for 35 years to Ms. Linda Lee Thomas. And, at the time, Grant was firmly established as Hollywood's most desirable heterosexual male, despite rumors in his later career that he was bisexual. Night and Day, of course, tiptoed around the subject of Porter's sexuality - a topic which would have been taboo for movie audiences in the forties - but the new biopic from director Irwin Winkler, De-Lovely, promises to be more truthful. "The story of his marriage to Linda and still being a gay man seemed to me to be a very unusual kind of story," said Winkler, "and I wanted to find out more about what made it tick and made it work or not work."

In De-Lovely, both director Irwin Winkler (Life as a House) and writer Jay Cocks (Gangs of New York) had no limitations from the Porter estate on the story, and they were determined to tell the story that Cole Porter himself wanted told back in 1946. Porter was quoted as saying about the original script in 1945, "It was as if I was reading about someone I know slightly. None of it is true." Instead Cocks has chosen to focus on the intensity of Cole Porter. Mr. Cocks has had an obsession with the lyrics to "In The Still of The Night" since he was twelve and says, "I wanted that to be the dramatic backbone. I remember seeing the lyrics printed on the page..They were nakedly honest and overwhelmingly intense. He wasn't ironic. It's just beautiful."

Although this film promises to be more factually accurate and stylistically different than the original, it has a similar intent - To keep the songs of Cole Porter alive for a current generation of music fans. To accomplish this feat they have brought in some of the music industries hippest artists such as Robbie Williams, Alanis Morrisette, Sheryl Crow, Elvis Costello, and Diana Krall. "It was not just finding good singers," says Producer Rob Cowan, ¿It was finding people who understand the craft of good songwriting."

In fact, the original film had similar aspirations of enlisting Porter favorites and some of the biggest musical performers of the Forties, like Fred Astaire, Jimmy Durante, Bob Hope and Ethel Merman. Cost overruns and script delays led to just one Porter veteran, Mary Martin, appearing in the film.

The unique component of the new film is that these songs were sung live on set and not lip-synched to a prerecorded track like most movie musicals. Mr. Winkler and Mr. Kline felt that the live performances add an intimacy and authenticity to the film. Those associated with the current project hope the subversive nature of the lyrics connect with young audiences. "It's all there in his lyrics," Kline says about "Live and Let Live." "That song's about, 'Don't judge me and I won't judge you' - a kind of coded message." And Alanis Morrisette shares a similar sentiment, "I just loved how subversive and sarcastic he is in his lyrics. And, now I know more, there are so many things you can read between the lines."

Showcasing some of Porter's greatest songs was the only thing Night and Day accomplished with its release in 1946. Cole Porter biographer William McBrien writes, "At least the film that was made kept a revue of his songs before the public." The script was the biggest issue with rewrites and changes being done for over two years. It was even a problem all the way into filming. The Unit Production Manager was quoted as saying, "They do not know how the end of this picture is going to be done. They have been writing this story for two years, and it is still not on paper." And the critics were equally scathing in their reviews and panned the film upon its release in 1946. "The dialogue is an attempt to recreate conversation of clever and intelligent people," wrote one Life magazine film critic, "bravely made by a script writer who seems to have never associated with them." On top of a bad script, director Michael Curtiz and star Cary Grant disagreed on everything from script to cuff length on his wardrobe. Grant was overheard saying upon leaving the set one night,"If I am ever stupid enough to be caught working with you then you'll know I'm either broke or I've lost my mind."

Although Jack Warner felt his studio had a hit movie on their hands, the finished film was marred by the multitude of production issues. A critic for the San Francisco News wrote, "This is no more the story of Cole Porter's life than a two cent stamp is of Washington." This is the exact reaction Winkler and MGM are hoping to avoid this time around with their remake. "I thought of this as a theatrical biography with music," say Mr. Winkler, "I also thought that if Cole Porter were lucky enough to have his last moments framed as a dramatic device, how would he live it? He would live it as a musical." Will the new quasi-fantastical, musical biography style work better for Cole Porter's life a second time around? Based on my viewing of the droll style of 1946's Night and Day, I would have to say, just as Cole Porter would, "It's All Right By Me."

TCM viewers will have a chance to compare both versions this summer when De-Lovely opens at theatres across the country in July and Turner Classic Movies airs Night and Day at 11:30 am (ET) on Friday, August 27th during our all day Cary Grant tribute; it's part of our August theme, "Summer Under the Stars."

by Tom Cappello
Remaking A Legend:  De-Lovely, A New Screen Biography Of Cole Porter

Remaking a Legend: De-Lovely, a new screen biography of Cole Porter

It's true. The two screen biographies of Cole Porter's life are as different as Night and Day. The original film, under the latter title, was released in 1946 and starred Cary Grant. That was an interesting casting decision since Cole Porter was gay, but happily married for 35 years to Ms. Linda Lee Thomas. And, at the time, Grant was firmly established as Hollywood's most desirable heterosexual male, despite rumors in his later career that he was bisexual. Night and Day, of course, tiptoed around the subject of Porter's sexuality - a topic which would have been taboo for movie audiences in the forties - but the new biopic from director Irwin Winkler, De-Lovely, promises to be more truthful. "The story of his marriage to Linda and still being a gay man seemed to me to be a very unusual kind of story," said Winkler, "and I wanted to find out more about what made it tick and made it work or not work." In De-Lovely, both director Irwin Winkler (Life as a House) and writer Jay Cocks (Gangs of New York) had no limitations from the Porter estate on the story, and they were determined to tell the story that Cole Porter himself wanted told back in 1946. Porter was quoted as saying about the original script in 1945, "It was as if I was reading about someone I know slightly. None of it is true." Instead Cocks has chosen to focus on the intensity of Cole Porter. Mr. Cocks has had an obsession with the lyrics to "In The Still of The Night" since he was twelve and says, "I wanted that to be the dramatic backbone. I remember seeing the lyrics printed on the page..They were nakedly honest and overwhelmingly intense. He wasn't ironic. It's just beautiful." Although this film promises to be more factually accurate and stylistically different than the original, it has a similar intent - To keep the songs of Cole Porter alive for a current generation of music fans. To accomplish this feat they have brought in some of the music industries hippest artists such as Robbie Williams, Alanis Morrisette, Sheryl Crow, Elvis Costello, and Diana Krall. "It was not just finding good singers," says Producer Rob Cowan, ¿It was finding people who understand the craft of good songwriting." In fact, the original film had similar aspirations of enlisting Porter favorites and some of the biggest musical performers of the Forties, like Fred Astaire, Jimmy Durante, Bob Hope and Ethel Merman. Cost overruns and script delays led to just one Porter veteran, Mary Martin, appearing in the film. The unique component of the new film is that these songs were sung live on set and not lip-synched to a prerecorded track like most movie musicals. Mr. Winkler and Mr. Kline felt that the live performances add an intimacy and authenticity to the film. Those associated with the current project hope the subversive nature of the lyrics connect with young audiences. "It's all there in his lyrics," Kline says about "Live and Let Live." "That song's about, 'Don't judge me and I won't judge you' - a kind of coded message." And Alanis Morrisette shares a similar sentiment, "I just loved how subversive and sarcastic he is in his lyrics. And, now I know more, there are so many things you can read between the lines." Showcasing some of Porter's greatest songs was the only thing Night and Day accomplished with its release in 1946. Cole Porter biographer William McBrien writes, "At least the film that was made kept a revue of his songs before the public." The script was the biggest issue with rewrites and changes being done for over two years. It was even a problem all the way into filming. The Unit Production Manager was quoted as saying, "They do not know how the end of this picture is going to be done. They have been writing this story for two years, and it is still not on paper." And the critics were equally scathing in their reviews and panned the film upon its release in 1946. "The dialogue is an attempt to recreate conversation of clever and intelligent people," wrote one Life magazine film critic, "bravely made by a script writer who seems to have never associated with them." On top of a bad script, director Michael Curtiz and star Cary Grant disagreed on everything from script to cuff length on his wardrobe. Grant was overheard saying upon leaving the set one night,"If I am ever stupid enough to be caught working with you then you'll know I'm either broke or I've lost my mind." Although Jack Warner felt his studio had a hit movie on their hands, the finished film was marred by the multitude of production issues. A critic for the San Francisco News wrote, "This is no more the story of Cole Porter's life than a two cent stamp is of Washington." This is the exact reaction Winkler and MGM are hoping to avoid this time around with their remake. "I thought of this as a theatrical biography with music," say Mr. Winkler, "I also thought that if Cole Porter were lucky enough to have his last moments framed as a dramatic device, how would he live it? He would live it as a musical." Will the new quasi-fantastical, musical biography style work better for Cole Porter's life a second time around? Based on my viewing of the droll style of 1946's Night and Day, I would have to say, just as Cole Porter would, "It's All Right By Me." TCM viewers will have a chance to compare both versions this summer when De-Lovely opens at theatres across the country in July and Turner Classic Movies airs Night and Day at 11:30 am (ET) on Friday, August 27th during our all day Cary Grant tribute; it's part of our August theme, "Summer Under the Stars." by Tom Cappello

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Limited Release in United States July 2, 2004

Released in United States Summer July 2, 2004

Expanded Release in United States July 16, 2004

Released in United States on Video December 21, 2004

Kodak

Limited Release in United States July 2, 2004

Released in United States Summer July 2, 2004

Expanded Release in United States July 16, 2004

Released in United States on Video December 21, 2004

Winner of the 2004 Satellite Award for Best Art Direction & Production Design by the International Press Academy (IPA).