The Captive


1h 52m 2000

Brief Synopsis

Ariane lives with wealthy Simon in the Paris apartment he shares with his grandmother. Constantly suspecting Ariane of infidelity, Simon arranges for her friend Andree to chaperone her whenever she leaves the apartment. Sympathetic and even affectionate to Simon, Ariane prefers women as sexual partn

Film Details

Also Known As
Captive, La
Release Date
2000
Production Company
Arte; Arte France Cinéma; Artedis; Centre National Du Cinema; Paradise Films; StudioCanal
Distribution Company
Alamode Film; Curzon Artificial Eye; Rlj Entertainment, Inc.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m

Synopsis

Ariane lives with wealthy Simon in the Paris apartment he shares with his grandmother. Constantly suspecting Ariane of infidelity, Simon arranges for her friend Andree to chaperone her whenever she leaves the apartment. Sympathetic and even affectionate to Simon, Ariane prefers women as sexual partners, and she leads a (known) double life, thus intensifying Simon's obsession and desire. But when the jealousy becomes overwhelming Simon asks Ariane to leave, causing a painful break-up which proves fatal.

Crew

Chantal Akerman

Screenwriter

Claire Atherton

Editor

Antoine Beau

Production Manager

Nicolas Becker

Sound Effects

Hacene Belkhedra

Unit Manager

Elisabeth Bocquet

Pre-Production Supervisor

Elisabeth Bocquet

In Charge Of Production

Paulo Branco

Producer

Christian Castandet

Wardrobe

Pierre Chavialle

Hairdresser

Thierry De Halleux

Sound

Eric De Kuyper

Screenwriter

Catherine De Loof

Supervising Sound Editor

Valerie Deloof

Sound Editor

Pierre Destailles

Song Performer ("Tout Ca Par Ce Qu'Au Bois De Chaville")

Marielle Duigou

Pre-Production Supervisor

Nathalie Duroscoat

Costume Designer

Eric Ferret

Studio Recordist

Claire Gerard-hirne

Costumer

Thierry Golitin

Location Manager

Renaud Gonzalez

Assistant Director

Sabine Lancelin

Director Of Photography

Christian Marti

Production Designer

Michele Masse

Assistant Director

Antoine Moussault

Unit Manager

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Other

Gerald Portenart

Hairdresser

Marcel Proust

Book As Source Material ("Remembrance Of Things Past, Vol 5")

Marcel Proust

From Story ("La Prisonniere")

Sergei Rachmaninov

Song Performer ("Lile Designer Morts Op 29")

Guillaume Roitfeld

Unit Production Manager

Claude Rolland

Song Performer ("Tout Ca Par Ce Qu'Au Bois De Chaville")

Richard Rousseau

Casting

Agathe Sallaberry

Script Supervisor

Franz Schubert

Song Performer ("Sonate Arpeggione En La Mineur" (From 'D821pour Violoncelle Et Piano'))

Janou Shammas

Set Decorator

Sttphane Thitbaut

Mixer

Paolo Trotta

Assistant Director

Marilyn Watelet

Pre-Production Supervisor

Sonia Wieder-atherton

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Captive, La
Release Date
2000
Production Company
Arte; Arte France Cinéma; Artedis; Centre National Du Cinema; Paradise Films; StudioCanal
Distribution Company
Alamode Film; Curzon Artificial Eye; Rlj Entertainment, Inc.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m

Articles

La Captive on DVD


Though he seems to have it all, young bachelor Simon (Stanislas Merhar) is a mess. Living in a sprawling Parisian penthouse with his grandmother (Francoise Bertin), housekeeper (Liliane Rovere), and sexy young Ariane (Sylvie Testud), a nymph whose sexual proclivities remain a mystery, Simon finds his idle time filled with thoughts of how to discover more about Ariane and to teach her more about himself. At night he sometimes slips into her room for some voyeuristic activity, which isn't bothersome at all (as she claims while showering in front of him). He constantly berates her with questions about her daily activities, her acquaintances, and her innermost thoughts, making her the intellectual "captive" of the title. Ariane is far less open with her relationships with other women, which drive Simon's curiosity to the breaking points and kick his obsession into overdrive.

A more sedate, enigmatic twist on such "I must possess you at all costs" dramas like The Collector, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! and, God forbid, Boxing Helena, La captive boasts an impressive pedigree. Director Chantal Akerman (A Couch in New York), she of the languid pace and formalist eye, certainly wasn't courting the mainstream by tackling a Marcel Proust adaptation; the notoriously abstract author (whose Time Regained was adapted one year before this) has proven a tough nut for filmmakers and most literature professors to crack, but Akerman gets props for her own version of La Prisonniere, the fifth book in his A la recherche du temps perdut (Remembrance of Lost Time).

Here the characters seem to exist in a vacuum, moving in their own distinct patterns which occasionally overlap but without providing any real satisfaction. Simon's muted frustration seems to be directed primarily at Ariane, though the hermetic nature of his entire environment seems to be a more probable cause. As a result, Akerman's static, stately takes in each scene take on a heavy atmospheric significance that will please patient art house viewers while driving many others screaming for the exits.

Following on the heels of a UK disc release, Kim Stim's modestly appointed but satisfying DVD features a colorful, satisfying transfer enhanced for 16x9 monitors and featuring English subtitles. The source material displays a few minor blemishes here and there, but it's an improvement over the more ragged (and badly authored) UK release.

The biggest extra is a video interview with Akerman (clocking in just under half an hour) in which she discusses the various thematic threads of the film and how it influenced her aesthetic directorial decisions. Another shorter interview (eight minutes) features Talstud discussing her own approach to the film and her maddeningly vague character. The French theatrical trailer is also included.

For more information about La Captive, visit Image Entertainment. To order La Captive, go to TCM Shopping.

by Nathaniel Thompson
La Captive On Dvd

La Captive on DVD

Though he seems to have it all, young bachelor Simon (Stanislas Merhar) is a mess. Living in a sprawling Parisian penthouse with his grandmother (Francoise Bertin), housekeeper (Liliane Rovere), and sexy young Ariane (Sylvie Testud), a nymph whose sexual proclivities remain a mystery, Simon finds his idle time filled with thoughts of how to discover more about Ariane and to teach her more about himself. At night he sometimes slips into her room for some voyeuristic activity, which isn't bothersome at all (as she claims while showering in front of him). He constantly berates her with questions about her daily activities, her acquaintances, and her innermost thoughts, making her the intellectual "captive" of the title. Ariane is far less open with her relationships with other women, which drive Simon's curiosity to the breaking points and kick his obsession into overdrive. A more sedate, enigmatic twist on such "I must possess you at all costs" dramas like The Collector, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! and, God forbid, Boxing Helena, La captive boasts an impressive pedigree. Director Chantal Akerman (A Couch in New York), she of the languid pace and formalist eye, certainly wasn't courting the mainstream by tackling a Marcel Proust adaptation; the notoriously abstract author (whose Time Regained was adapted one year before this) has proven a tough nut for filmmakers and most literature professors to crack, but Akerman gets props for her own version of La Prisonniere, the fifth book in his A la recherche du temps perdut (Remembrance of Lost Time). Here the characters seem to exist in a vacuum, moving in their own distinct patterns which occasionally overlap but without providing any real satisfaction. Simon's muted frustration seems to be directed primarily at Ariane, though the hermetic nature of his entire environment seems to be a more probable cause. As a result, Akerman's static, stately takes in each scene take on a heavy atmospheric significance that will please patient art house viewers while driving many others screaming for the exits. Following on the heels of a UK disc release, Kim Stim's modestly appointed but satisfying DVD features a colorful, satisfying transfer enhanced for 16x9 monitors and featuring English subtitles. The source material displays a few minor blemishes here and there, but it's an improvement over the more ragged (and badly authored) UK release. The biggest extra is a video interview with Akerman (clocking in just under half an hour) in which she discusses the various thematic threads of the film and how it influenced her aesthetic directorial decisions. Another shorter interview (eight minutes) features Talstud discussing her own approach to the film and her maddeningly vague character. The French theatrical trailer is also included. For more information about La Captive, visit Image Entertainment. To order La Captive, go to TCM Shopping. by Nathaniel Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video January 27, 2004

Released in United States November 2000

Released in United States 2001

Released in United States March 2001

Shown at London Film Festival (French Revolutions) November 1-16, 2000.

Shown at Rotterdam International Film Festival (Main Programme) January 24 - February 4, 2001.

Released in United States on Video January 27, 2004

Released in United States November 2000 (Shown at London Film Festival (French Revolutions) November 1-16, 2000.)

Released in United States 2001 (Shown at Rotterdam International Film Festival (Main Programme) January 24 - February 4, 2001.)

Released in United States March 2001 (Shown in New York City (Walter Reade) as part of program "Rendez-Vous with French Cinema Today" March 9-18, 2001.)