Rusty: The Great Rescue


1h 30m 1998

Brief Synopsis

Orphaned siblings go to live on their grandparents' farm.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

Orphaned siblings go to live on their grandparents' farm.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)


American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57.

He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts.

But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children.

by Michael T. Toole
Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)

American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57. He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts. But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children. by Michael T. Toole

Rodney Dangerfield, (1921-2004)


Rodney Dangerfield, the bug-eyed comedian and actor, who gained fame for his self-deprecating one-liners (i.e. "When I was born, I was so ugly that the doctor slapped my mother!", "I called the suicide hotline and they put me on hold!") and signature catch phrase "I don't get no respect!" died on October 4 at the UCLA Medical Center. He had lapsed into a coma after undergoing heart surgery this past August. He was 82.

He was born Jacob Cohen in Babylon, Long Island, New York on November 22, 1921. His father was a vaudevillian performer who played professionally as Phil Roy. Known as something of a cut-up in high school, he started performing comedy when he was 20, and spent the next 10 years working alongthe Atlantic coast under the name Jack Roy.

His career was temporarily sidelined with family responsiblities - he married Joyce Indig in 1949 and she soon gave birth to two children: Brian and Melanie. With a family to support, he sold aluminum siding and lived in New Jersey, yet still held onto his dream of being a stand-up comic. In 1961, he divorced his wife (by all accounts his marriage had been an unhappy one), and he hit the road again as Rodney Dangerfield. By the mid-60s, Rondey was hitting his stride, following a some successful nightclub appearances in Manhattan and Atlantic City. At this point, he had developed his stage persona as a harassed schmo, always tugging at his tie and padding down his sweated brow. His persistancy paid off when he made his first television appearances in 1967: The Ed Sullivan Show and The Merv Griffin Show both raised his profile, but what really made Rodney was his July 29, 1969 debut on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. With his flurry of one-liners, goggle eyes and, of course, "I don't get no respect!" plea, audiences loved him and Rodney would make over 70 appearances over the next 30 years on The Tonight Show for both Johnny and eventual host, Jay Leno.

Around this time, Rodney garnered his first film role, as an irritable theater manager in The Projectionist (1971), but he would have to wait almost 10 years later before he struck box-office gold. The film was Caddyshack (1980), and as Al Czervik, the loudly dressed, obnoxious but lovable millionaire who crashes a snotty Golf Club, Rodney may not have displayed great acting skills, but his comic personality was vibrant and engaging, and with the comedy being one of the biggest hits of the year, he was now a star.

His follow-up to Caddyshack, Easy Money (1983), followed the same formula (he played a baby photgrapher who inherits money), but the tone was much nastier, and the crirtics panned it. He rebounded though with the biggest hit of his career, Back to School (1986). The plot was simple, a self-made millionaire goes back to college to prove his son his worth only to fall in love in the process, grossed over $100 million. Indeed, it looked like Rodney Dangerfield had all the respect in the world.

His career kept taking surprise turns in the '90s: he was an in-demand "guest voice" on such animated projects like Rover Dangerfield, The Simpsons, and Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist. Yet, the biggest surprise by far was his dramatic turn as an abusive, alcoholic father in Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers (1994). For his performance, he received glowing reviews, but ill-health was becoming an issue for him, and Rodney had to curtail his schedule considerably after this.

He returned to the screen as the Devil in the Adam Sandler comedy Little Nicky (2000), but on his 80th birthday (November 22, 2001), he suffered a mild heart attack, and in the Spring of 2003, he underwent brain surgery to improve his blood flow in preparation for an upcoming heart-valve replacement surgery. This year started off brightly for him: he made another film appearance, Angles with Angles; released his autobiography in May entitled It Ain't Easy Being Me and in just the past two months appeared on television for Jimmy Kimmel Live, and in an episode of the CBS sitcom Still Standing playing a wisecracking, next-door neighbor. Sadly, this flurry of reactivity was not to last. On August 24, he entered UCLA Medical Center for heart valve-replacement surgery, but complications from an infection after the operation led to a coma, and he reamined in vegetative state for the last six weeks of his life. He is survived by his wife of 11 years, Joan Child; his son, Brian; and daughter, Melanie.

by Michael T. Toole

Rodney Dangerfield, (1921-2004)

Rodney Dangerfield, the bug-eyed comedian and actor, who gained fame for his self-deprecating one-liners (i.e. "When I was born, I was so ugly that the doctor slapped my mother!", "I called the suicide hotline and they put me on hold!") and signature catch phrase "I don't get no respect!" died on October 4 at the UCLA Medical Center. He had lapsed into a coma after undergoing heart surgery this past August. He was 82. He was born Jacob Cohen in Babylon, Long Island, New York on November 22, 1921. His father was a vaudevillian performer who played professionally as Phil Roy. Known as something of a cut-up in high school, he started performing comedy when he was 20, and spent the next 10 years working alongthe Atlantic coast under the name Jack Roy. His career was temporarily sidelined with family responsiblities - he married Joyce Indig in 1949 and she soon gave birth to two children: Brian and Melanie. With a family to support, he sold aluminum siding and lived in New Jersey, yet still held onto his dream of being a stand-up comic. In 1961, he divorced his wife (by all accounts his marriage had been an unhappy one), and he hit the road again as Rodney Dangerfield. By the mid-60s, Rondey was hitting his stride, following a some successful nightclub appearances in Manhattan and Atlantic City. At this point, he had developed his stage persona as a harassed schmo, always tugging at his tie and padding down his sweated brow. His persistancy paid off when he made his first television appearances in 1967: The Ed Sullivan Show and The Merv Griffin Show both raised his profile, but what really made Rodney was his July 29, 1969 debut on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. With his flurry of one-liners, goggle eyes and, of course, "I don't get no respect!" plea, audiences loved him and Rodney would make over 70 appearances over the next 30 years on The Tonight Show for both Johnny and eventual host, Jay Leno. Around this time, Rodney garnered his first film role, as an irritable theater manager in The Projectionist (1971), but he would have to wait almost 10 years later before he struck box-office gold. The film was Caddyshack (1980), and as Al Czervik, the loudly dressed, obnoxious but lovable millionaire who crashes a snotty Golf Club, Rodney may not have displayed great acting skills, but his comic personality was vibrant and engaging, and with the comedy being one of the biggest hits of the year, he was now a star. His follow-up to Caddyshack, Easy Money (1983), followed the same formula (he played a baby photgrapher who inherits money), but the tone was much nastier, and the crirtics panned it. He rebounded though with the biggest hit of his career, Back to School (1986). The plot was simple, a self-made millionaire goes back to college to prove his son his worth only to fall in love in the process, grossed over $100 million. Indeed, it looked like Rodney Dangerfield had all the respect in the world. His career kept taking surprise turns in the '90s: he was an in-demand "guest voice" on such animated projects like Rover Dangerfield, The Simpsons, and Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist. Yet, the biggest surprise by far was his dramatic turn as an abusive, alcoholic father in Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers (1994). For his performance, he received glowing reviews, but ill-health was becoming an issue for him, and Rodney had to curtail his schedule considerably after this. He returned to the screen as the Devil in the Adam Sandler comedy Little Nicky (2000), but on his 80th birthday (November 22, 2001), he suffered a mild heart attack, and in the Spring of 2003, he underwent brain surgery to improve his blood flow in preparation for an upcoming heart-valve replacement surgery. This year started off brightly for him: he made another film appearance, Angles with Angles; released his autobiography in May entitled It Ain't Easy Being Me and in just the past two months appeared on television for Jimmy Kimmel Live, and in an episode of the CBS sitcom Still Standing playing a wisecracking, next-door neighbor. Sadly, this flurry of reactivity was not to last. On August 24, he entered UCLA Medical Center for heart valve-replacement surgery, but complications from an infection after the operation led to a coma, and he reamined in vegetative state for the last six weeks of his life. He is survived by his wife of 11 years, Joan Child; his son, Brian; and daughter, Melanie. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1998

Released in United States on Video September 22, 1998

Straight-to-video release.

Began shooting May 6, 1996.

Completed shooting April 18, 1997.

Released in United States 1998

Released in United States on Video September 22, 1998