Glory Daze


1h 44m 1995

Brief Synopsis

At the University of California at Santa Cruz, the most notorious hot spot is the fraternity house nicknamed El Rancho Grande--part cess pool, part party central, part Gen-X commune. Graduation weights heavy on five of the frat boys as they prepare to go their separate ways. One boy, Jack, is unable

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1995
Production Company
Axiom Films; CFI Hollywood; Director'S Sound & Editorial Services Inc; Eastman Kodak; Panavision, Ltd.; Warner Bros. Worldwide Studio Facilities
Distribution Company
Nordisk Film; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Santa Cruz, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m

Synopsis

At the University of California at Santa Cruz, the most notorious hot spot is the fraternity house nicknamed El Rancho Grande--part cess pool, part party central, part Gen-X commune. Graduation weights heavy on five of the frat boys as they prepare to go their separate ways. One boy, Jack, is unable to shake the gnawing fear that his beloved comrades will never recapture their sybaritic lifestyle. Graduation proves to be as torturous as the Rancho boys feared. An increasingly absurd series of encounters with assorted parents, girlfriends, professors and potential employers exacerbate their fears and force the young men to grapple with adulthood. The ultimate choice for the El Rancho Grande boys is to destroy the last vestige of their college days... the future can wait.

Crew

Dick Stauff Acher

Driver

Nazli Afar

Set Production Assistant

Ed Anders

Stunt Man (For Ben Affleck)

Jeff Appelbaum

Apprentice Editor

Jacqueline Arthur

Costume Designer

John Ashker

Stunt Coordinator

C J Beach

Set Production Assistant

Rebecca Benam

2nd Assistant Camera (2nd Unit)

George Berndt

Supervising Sound Editor

Dominik Black

Set Production Assistant

Michael S Bloom

Executive Producer

Jane Boegel

Sound Editor Assistant

Javier J Bonafont

Location Manager

Javier Bonafont

Location Manager

Mary Beth Bonjour

Caterer

Joe Boyle

Grip

Kristen Brickner

Second 2nd Assistant Director

Rudy Brown

Security

Reginald Bryant

Sound Mixer

Daniel Candib

Assistant Editor

Richard Candib

Editor

Bud Cardos

Driver

Susan Carpenter

2nd Assistant Director

Susan L Carpenter

Assistant Director

Adam Cavert

Special Effects

James Christopher

Office Assistant

Pat Conrad

1st Assistant Camera (2nd Unit)

Pat Conrad

Grip

Ronald Loy Cox

Swing

Don Davis

1st Assistant Camera (2nd Unit)

Sue Doell

Assistant Production Coordinator

Eric Dosch

Re-Recording Sound; Sound Advice

Barry Dresner

Additional Editor

Kristin Eaton

Apprentice Editor

Chris Edward

Swing

John Edwards-younger

Effects & Background Sound Editor

Felicia Fasano

Casting

Michael Stephen Ferrari

Line Producer

George Flores

Boom Operator

Will Fouler

Video Playback

Stephanie Fowler

Makeup

Stephanie Fowler

Hair

Nicholas Franchot

Grip

Michael Franco

Grip

Mark Gannel

Props Master

Sean Garnett

Grip

Jordan S Green

Apprentice Editor

Kathy Grieb

Grip

Jeff Hall

Office Assistant (Santa Cruz)

Paul Hargrove

Set Production Assistant

Ian Harper

Still Photographer

Drew Huffman

Other

Victor Ivanov

Driver

Adam Jones

Gaffer

Tony Kadell

Assistant Editor

Kenny Kaplan

Driver

P. Gerald Knight

Transportation Coordinator

Jonathan Lally

Office Assistant (Santa Cruz)

Christian Lamb

1st Assistant Camera

Jim Lanahan

Still Photographer

Dawn Laurel

1st Assistant Camera (2nd Unit)

Matt Leaventhal

Electrician

Ashley Lemery

Set Production Assistant

Susan Lewis

Set Production Assistant

Micheal Lissauer

Office Assistant

Tom Lovlett

Sound Mixer (Reshoot)

Regina Lovlo

Set Production Assistant

Carlo Maffirca

1st Assistant Camera (2nd Unit)

Matt Marky

Boom Operator (Reshoot)

Adolfo Martinez-perez

Story Board Artist

Caroline Mary

Assistant Costume Designer

Christopher Medak

1st Assistant Director

Jon Middleton

Office Assistant (Santa Cruz)

Jon Middleton

Craft Service (Los Angeles)

Chris Moore

Producer

Richard Nausworthy

Key Grip

William P O'reilly

Executive Producer

Carlyce Olivieri

Office Assistant (Santa Cruz)

Peter Owen

2nd Assistant Camera

Melanie Pearson

Office Assistant

Sean Prichard

Electrician (Santa Cruz)

Carlton Prickett

Apprentice Editor

John Pryor

Skate Boarder Stunt

David Ricardi

Production Accountant

Mark Riccardi

Craft Service (Los Angeles)

Mark Riccardi

Extras Casting

Christine Rodgers

Production Coordinator

Sabrina A Rosen

Costumes

Jerry Ross

Supervising Sound Editor

Sandy Sabatine

Craft Service (Santa Cruz)

Joaquin Sancher

Electrician

Charles Schner

Camera Operator

Paul Sharpe

Skate Boarder Stunt

Liz Shimkus

Electrician

Steve "shoe" Shoemaker

Transportation Captain

Andy Shuttleworth

Steadicam Operator

Karol Siegel

Script Supervisor

David Silverstone

Assistant Props

Mark Skilton

Director Of Photography (2nd Unit)

Christopher Slater

Co-Producer

David Sobel

Still Photographer

Alfred Sole

Production Designer

Mark A Sole

Swing

Ric Spencer

Costumes

Francisco Stohr

Story Board Artist

Georgia Strachan

On-Set Dresser

Larry Sushinski

Best Boy Electric

Paul Tanzillo

Negative Cutter

Rafael S Tapia

Set Decorator

Christopher Taylor

Director Of Photography

Martha Terry

Office Assistant

Sarah K Thiessen

Apprentice Editor

Victoria Thompson

Apprentice Editor

Jeff Tomhave

Dolly Grip

Renee Tondelli

Adr

Lia Vollack

Music Supervisor

Diane Ward

Assistant Production Coordinator

Aaron M Weinberg

Producer

Matthew F Weinberg

Production Associate

Matthew F Weinberg

Extras Casting

Rich Wilkes

Screenwriter

William R Woodward

Producer

Jim Yant

Adr

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1995
Production Company
Axiom Films; CFI Hollywood; Director'S Sound & Editorial Services Inc; Eastman Kodak; Panavision, Ltd.; Warner Bros. Worldwide Studio Facilities
Distribution Company
Nordisk Film; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Santa Cruz, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m

Articles

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)


Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62.

Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe.

It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art.

Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent.

After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray.

His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month.

Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing.

by Michael T. Toole
Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62. Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe. It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art. Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent. After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray. His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month. Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 27, 1996

Released in United States January 1996

Released in United States October 11, 1996

Released in United States October 1995

Released in United States on Video October 7, 1997

Released in United States September 1995

Shown at Hamptons International Film Festival October 18-22, 1995.

Shown at Independent Feature Film Market (IFFM) in New York City under title "Cruz" September 17-24, 1995.

Shown at Nortel Palm Springs International Film Festival in Palm Springs, California January 5-21, 1996.

Shown at Slamdance International Film Festival & Market (in competition) in Park City, Utah January 18-28, 1996.

Feature directorial debut for veteran screenwriter Rich Wilkes.

Began shooting September 19, 1994.

Completed shooting late October 1994.

Cruz Partners was also involved in the production of this feature.

Released in United States January 1996 (Shown at Nortel Palm Springs International Film Festival in Palm Springs, California January 5-21, 1996.)

Released in United States January 1996 (Shown at Slamdance International Film Festival & Market (in competition) in Park City, Utah January 18-28, 1996.)

Released in United States September 1995 (Shown at Independent Feature Film Market (IFFM) in New York City under title "Cruz" September 17-24, 1995.)

Released in United States Fall September 27, 1996

Released in United States October 1995 (Shown at Hamptons International Film Festival October 18-22, 1995.)

Released in United States on Video October 7, 1997

Released in United States October 11, 1996 (Austin, Texas)