La Scorta


1h 32m 1993

Brief Synopsis

A magistrate is sent from northern Italy to clean up the Mafia stronghold of Trapani, Sicily. After realizing that the Mafia has infiltrated every level of law enforcement and no one can be trusted, he turns for help to the four young bodyguards assigned to protect him.

Film Details

Also Known As
Escort, The, Scorta
MPAA Rating
Genre
Crime
Drama
Foreign
Political
Thriller
Release Date
1993

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Synopsis

A magistrate is sent from northern Italy to clean up the Mafia stronghold of Trapani, Sicily. After realizing that the Mafia has infiltrated every level of law enforcement and no one can be trusted, he turns for help to the four young bodyguards assigned to protect him.

Film Details

Also Known As
Escort, The, Scorta
MPAA Rating
Genre
Crime
Drama
Foreign
Political
Thriller
Release Date
1993

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Articles

La Scorta - LA SCORTA - A Fact-Inspired Political/Crime Thriller from Italy on DVD


Director Sidney Lumet recently championed an American theatrical re-release for La Scorta (1993), a fact-inspired political/crime thriller from Italy regarding a Sicilian police detail saddled with the thankless and dangerous task of safeguarding government prosecutors from assassination attempts leveled by La Cosa Nostra. Lumet's affinity for the film, recently released in a special edition DVD by Blue Underground, is understandable, as it is a tautly-told tale of intrigue comparable to the director's own estimable contributions to the cop genre like Serpico (1973), Prince of the City (1981) and Q&A (1990).

La Scorta opens by detailing one such savage strike against a judge and his escort, which sets the plot in motion. The brooding, honor-bound police captain Angelo Mandolesi (Claudio Amendola), whose boyhood friend was a casualty of the assault, requests a transfer from Rome with the goal of being named to the escort. Far less thrilled with being assigned to the squad is the indolent young cop Fabio Muzzi (Ricky Memphis), who had been crossing his fingers for a cush detail. The unit's head, Andrea Corsale (Enrico Lo Verso), is youthful but ambitious, desirous of advancement for the benefit of his wife and kids, and wholly uninterested in any departmental rocking of the boat.

They're named responsible for the safety of the assassinated judge's newly-transferred replacement, Michele de Francesco (Carlo Cecchi), a dignified if aloof figure recently estranged from his wife. The judge has little choice than to get quickly acclimated to the realities of his new assignment, which include being tensely hustled from home to office under heavy guard by cops forced by underfunding to take turns sharing the unit's insufficient supply of body armor.

The tension truly begins to mount once de Francesco rolls up his sleeves and addresses the inquiry that got his predecessor killed, dealing with a local business' lock on water rights apparently bought with payoffs high into the government. As the inquiry deepens, and the already omnipresent danger ratchets up as a result of corrupt forces within the department, the bond between the members of the detail and their charge knits tighter, drawn by the gravity of Mandolesi's sense of duty. Corsale, who had been an interdepartmental leak for de Francesco's movements, is shamed into abandoning office politics for the judge's investigation, and de Francesco finds himself humbled by his handlers' willingness to stare down dire professional and personal repercussions.

La Scorta represented an early directing effort for Ricky Tognazzi (son of the venerable character lead Ugo Tognazzi), and he did a remarkably polished job of conveying the white-knuckle existence lead by these out-manned and out-gunned operatives and rendering the interpersonal bonds that such circumstances can forge. As his character did for his squad, Amendola gives the entire proceedings a fulcrum with a charismatic performance. The other players, including the gorgeous Lorenza Indovina as Corsale's worried wife, deliver uniformly fine work as well. A memorable, driving score from Ennio Morricone caps the production quite nicely.

Blue Underground's release of La Scorta isn't the first time the film has surfaced in America on DVD, but it's a cut above First Look Entertainment's bare-bones, pan-and-scan offering. Beyond the 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen presentation, commentary is offered courtesy of Tognazzi and producer Claudio Bonivento. Also included is the featurette Judging La Scorta, which offers interview footage with Tognazzi, Amendola, Bonivento, scenarists Graziano Diana and Simona Izzo, and cinematographer Alessio Gelsini. Two trailers for the American and Italian markets round out the extras.

For more information about La Scorta, visit Blue Underground. To order La Scorta, go to TCM Shopping.

by Jay S. Steinberg
La Scorta - La Scorta - A Fact-Inspired Political/crime Thriller From Italy On Dvd

La Scorta - LA SCORTA - A Fact-Inspired Political/Crime Thriller from Italy on DVD

Director Sidney Lumet recently championed an American theatrical re-release for La Scorta (1993), a fact-inspired political/crime thriller from Italy regarding a Sicilian police detail saddled with the thankless and dangerous task of safeguarding government prosecutors from assassination attempts leveled by La Cosa Nostra. Lumet's affinity for the film, recently released in a special edition DVD by Blue Underground, is understandable, as it is a tautly-told tale of intrigue comparable to the director's own estimable contributions to the cop genre like Serpico (1973), Prince of the City (1981) and Q&A (1990). La Scorta opens by detailing one such savage strike against a judge and his escort, which sets the plot in motion. The brooding, honor-bound police captain Angelo Mandolesi (Claudio Amendola), whose boyhood friend was a casualty of the assault, requests a transfer from Rome with the goal of being named to the escort. Far less thrilled with being assigned to the squad is the indolent young cop Fabio Muzzi (Ricky Memphis), who had been crossing his fingers for a cush detail. The unit's head, Andrea Corsale (Enrico Lo Verso), is youthful but ambitious, desirous of advancement for the benefit of his wife and kids, and wholly uninterested in any departmental rocking of the boat. They're named responsible for the safety of the assassinated judge's newly-transferred replacement, Michele de Francesco (Carlo Cecchi), a dignified if aloof figure recently estranged from his wife. The judge has little choice than to get quickly acclimated to the realities of his new assignment, which include being tensely hustled from home to office under heavy guard by cops forced by underfunding to take turns sharing the unit's insufficient supply of body armor. The tension truly begins to mount once de Francesco rolls up his sleeves and addresses the inquiry that got his predecessor killed, dealing with a local business' lock on water rights apparently bought with payoffs high into the government. As the inquiry deepens, and the already omnipresent danger ratchets up as a result of corrupt forces within the department, the bond between the members of the detail and their charge knits tighter, drawn by the gravity of Mandolesi's sense of duty. Corsale, who had been an interdepartmental leak for de Francesco's movements, is shamed into abandoning office politics for the judge's investigation, and de Francesco finds himself humbled by his handlers' willingness to stare down dire professional and personal repercussions. La Scorta represented an early directing effort for Ricky Tognazzi (son of the venerable character lead Ugo Tognazzi), and he did a remarkably polished job of conveying the white-knuckle existence lead by these out-manned and out-gunned operatives and rendering the interpersonal bonds that such circumstances can forge. As his character did for his squad, Amendola gives the entire proceedings a fulcrum with a charismatic performance. The other players, including the gorgeous Lorenza Indovina as Corsale's worried wife, deliver uniformly fine work as well. A memorable, driving score from Ennio Morricone caps the production quite nicely. Blue Underground's release of La Scorta isn't the first time the film has surfaced in America on DVD, but it's a cut above First Look Entertainment's bare-bones, pan-and-scan offering. Beyond the 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen presentation, commentary is offered courtesy of Tognazzi and producer Claudio Bonivento. Also included is the featurette Judging La Scorta, which offers interview footage with Tognazzi, Amendola, Bonivento, scenarists Graziano Diana and Simona Izzo, and cinematographer Alessio Gelsini. Two trailers for the American and Italian markets round out the extras. For more information about La Scorta, visit Blue Underground. To order La Scorta, go to TCM Shopping. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States January 1994

Released in United States July 8, 1994

Released in United States May 1993

Released in United States on Video August 19, 1997

Released in United States on Video September 2, 1997

Released in United States Spring May 4, 1994

Shown at Cannes Film Festival (in competition) May 13-24, 1993.

Shown at Palm Springs International Film Festival January 6-16, 1994.

This film is based on the actual story of Judge Francesco Taurisano, a dedicated special council sent to Sicily in 1989 to investigate government ties to the local Mafia.

Formerly distributed by Boulevard Films (home video).

Released in United States January 1994 (Shown at Palm Springs International Film Festival January 6-16, 1994.)

Released in United States May 1993 (Shown at Cannes Film Festival (in competition) May 13-24, 1993.)

Released in United States Spring May 4, 1994

Released in United States July 8, 1994 (Los Angeles)

Released in United States on Video September 2, 1997

Released in United States on Video August 19, 1997