The Small Voice


1h 25m 1948

Brief Synopsis

A young couple discover the car crash victims they tried to help are escaped criminals.

Film Details

Also Known As
Hideout, Small Voice
Genre
Crime
Release Date
1948

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

A young couple discover the car crash victims they tried to help are escaped criminals.

Film Details

Also Known As
Hideout, Small Voice
Genre
Crime
Release Date
1948

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

The Hideout (1948) aka The Small Voice


The Hideout (1948), which is also known by its original British title The Small Voice, is a curious film to boast the screen debut of musical star Howard Keel, but that it does. The tense, black-and-white British thriller is about a couple held captive in their home by escaped convicts, one of whom is played by Keel, and it came about for the actor because he was at the time performing in the London stage version of Oklahoma!. (He played the character of "Curly" in that production for a whopping 18 months.)

A British talent agent arranged a screen test, and Keel got the part. At this point the actor, whose birth name was "Harold Leek," was using "Harold Keel" as his stage name; he is billed as such in The Hideout. While the picture was in production, Keel got a call from MGM, informing him that a separate screen test he had made months earlier in Hollywood had now resulted in the studio wanting him for Annie Get Your Gun (1950), opposite Judy Garland. That was indeed Keel's next movie; he was billed for the first time as "Howard Keel" and became an overnight star.

The real star of The Hideout was Valerie Hobson, a British actress entering the peak phase of her career. She had been signed by Universal at age 18, but once she got to Hollywood the studio didn't really know how to use her. After trying her in various films including The Bride of Frankenstein (1935), Universal decided not to renew her contract and Hobson returned to England to continue her career there. She also picked up a husband, marrying producer Anthony Havelock-Allan in 1939. In the 1940s, Havelock-Allan formed a production company with David Lean and Ronald Neame, resulting in esteemed productions such as Brief Encounter (1945) and Great Expectations (1946), which co-starred Hobson. After Great Expectations, Havelock-Allan left the company and independently produced The Hideout, which was followed by several more collaborations between the husband-and-wife team.

In 1952, however, the couple divorced. Hobson later married John Profumo, a British politician who famously resigned his cabinet post in 1963 after a sex scandal with a woman who had also been seeing a Soviet official. (That story was dramatized in the 1989 film Scandal.)

Based on a novel by Robert Westerby, The Hideout was co-written by Derek Neame, brother of the famous cinematographer/director Ronald Neame, and directed by Fergus McDonell, an Oscar®-winning editor (Odd Man Out, 1947) making his directorial debut. McDonell would continue directing and editing throughout the 1950s, after which he concentrated solely on editing.

Producer: Anthony Havelock-Allan
Director: Fergus McDonell
Screenplay: George Barraud, Derek Neame, Julian Orde; Robert Westerby (novel "The Small Voice")
Cinematography: Stanley Pavey
Art Direction: Andrew Mazzei
Music: Stanley Black
Film Editing: Manuel del Campo
Cast: Valerie Hobson (Eleanor Byrne), James Donald (Murray Byrne), Howard Keel (Boke), David Greene (Jim), Michael Balfour (Frankie), Joan Young (Potter, the housekeeper), Angela Foulos (Jenny Moss), Glyn Dearman (Ken), Norman Claridge (superintendent), Edward Evans (Ken Moss, as boy).
BW-85m.

by Jeremy Arnold
The Hideout (1948) Aka The Small Voice

The Hideout (1948) aka The Small Voice

The Hideout (1948), which is also known by its original British title The Small Voice, is a curious film to boast the screen debut of musical star Howard Keel, but that it does. The tense, black-and-white British thriller is about a couple held captive in their home by escaped convicts, one of whom is played by Keel, and it came about for the actor because he was at the time performing in the London stage version of Oklahoma!. (He played the character of "Curly" in that production for a whopping 18 months.) A British talent agent arranged a screen test, and Keel got the part. At this point the actor, whose birth name was "Harold Leek," was using "Harold Keel" as his stage name; he is billed as such in The Hideout. While the picture was in production, Keel got a call from MGM, informing him that a separate screen test he had made months earlier in Hollywood had now resulted in the studio wanting him for Annie Get Your Gun (1950), opposite Judy Garland. That was indeed Keel's next movie; he was billed for the first time as "Howard Keel" and became an overnight star. The real star of The Hideout was Valerie Hobson, a British actress entering the peak phase of her career. She had been signed by Universal at age 18, but once she got to Hollywood the studio didn't really know how to use her. After trying her in various films including The Bride of Frankenstein (1935), Universal decided not to renew her contract and Hobson returned to England to continue her career there. She also picked up a husband, marrying producer Anthony Havelock-Allan in 1939. In the 1940s, Havelock-Allan formed a production company with David Lean and Ronald Neame, resulting in esteemed productions such as Brief Encounter (1945) and Great Expectations (1946), which co-starred Hobson. After Great Expectations, Havelock-Allan left the company and independently produced The Hideout, which was followed by several more collaborations between the husband-and-wife team. In 1952, however, the couple divorced. Hobson later married John Profumo, a British politician who famously resigned his cabinet post in 1963 after a sex scandal with a woman who had also been seeing a Soviet official. (That story was dramatized in the 1989 film Scandal.) Based on a novel by Robert Westerby, The Hideout was co-written by Derek Neame, brother of the famous cinematographer/director Ronald Neame, and directed by Fergus McDonell, an Oscar®-winning editor (Odd Man Out, 1947) making his directorial debut. McDonell would continue directing and editing throughout the 1950s, after which he concentrated solely on editing. Producer: Anthony Havelock-Allan Director: Fergus McDonell Screenplay: George Barraud, Derek Neame, Julian Orde; Robert Westerby (novel "The Small Voice") Cinematography: Stanley Pavey Art Direction: Andrew Mazzei Music: Stanley Black Film Editing: Manuel del Campo Cast: Valerie Hobson (Eleanor Byrne), James Donald (Murray Byrne), Howard Keel (Boke), David Greene (Jim), Michael Balfour (Frankie), Joan Young (Potter, the housekeeper), Angela Foulos (Jenny Moss), Glyn Dearman (Ken), Norman Claridge (superintendent), Edward Evans (Ken Moss, as boy). BW-85m. by Jeremy Arnold

TCM Remembers Howard Keel this Monday, Nov. 15th

PLEASE NOTE SCHEDULE CHANGE


TCM will air the following films featuring the late actor Howard Keel this Monday, November 15th :

6:00 AM
Callaway Went Thataway (1951)

7:30 AM
Ride, Vaquero! (1953)

9:30 AM
War Wagon (1967)

11:30 AM
"MGM Parade Show #14"
(Keel talks with George Murphy about his latest MGM picture "Kismet")(1955)

12:00 PM
Showboat (1951)

2:00 PM
Kiss Me Kate (1953)

4:00 PM
Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954)

6:00 PM
Kismet (1955)

HOWARD KEEL (1919-2004):

Howard Keel, the strapping singer and actor whose glorious baritone took him to stardom in the early '50s in some of MGM's best musicals, including Showboat, Kiss Me Kate and Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, died on November 7 of colon cancer at his home in Palm Desert, California. He was 85.

He was born Harry Clifford Leek on April 13, 1919, in Gillespie, Illinois. His father, was a coal miner and his mother, a strict Methodist, forbid the children from enjoying popular entertainments. When his dad died, his mother relocated the family to California when Harry was still a young teenager.

After he graduated high school, Keel had a brief stint as a singing busboy, but had not considered a professional career as a vocalist....until one fateful evening in 1939. It was at this time he saw celebrated opera singer, Lawrence Tibbett, at the Hollywood Bowl. Keel was inspired, and he soon began taking voice lessons. Over the next several years, he carefully trained his voice while entering any singing contest he could find. It wasn't long before his talents caught the attention of Rodgers & Hammerstein.

In 1946, they signed him to replace John Raitt in the Broadway production of Carousel, changed his name to Howard Keel (His proper surname Leek spelled backwards), and Keel was on his way to international stardom.

After his run in Carousel ended, he sailed to London the following year to play the role of Curley in Rodgers & Hammerstein's Oklahoma. He received rave reviews from the London press, and by the time he returned to the United States in 1948, he was ready to make his move into films.

Keel made his movie debut in the British thriller, The Small Voice (1948), but it would be his second film, and first for MGM, portraying Frank Butler, Betty Hutton's leading man in Annie Get Your Gun (1950), that sealed his success. Keel's several strengths as a performer: his supple, commanding singing voice; his athletic, 6'4" frame; striking, "matinee-idol" good looks; and his good humored personality made him one of the studios' top leading men over the next few years. Indeed, between 1951-55, Keel could do not wrong with the material he was given: Show Boat (1951), Lovely to Look at (1952), Kiss Me Kate (1953), Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954), and Kismet (1955). Clearly, he was a shining star in this golden era of the MGM musical.

By the late '50s, movie musicals began to fade out of fashion, but Keel returned to the stage and had success performing with several touring companies. He made a brief return to films when he was cast as a seaman battling carnivorous plants from outer space in the popular British sci-fi hit, The Day of the Triffids (1962). Television also provided some work, where he guest starred in some of the more popular shows in the late '60s including Run For Your Life, and The Lucy Show.

Keel would keep a low profile over the next decade, but he made an amazing comeback in 1981, when he was cast as Clayton Farlow, Ellie Ewing's (Barbara Bel Geddes) second husband in the wildly successful prime time soap, Dallas. Not only did he play the role for ten seasons, but Keel would also be in demand for many other shows throughout the '80s and '90s: The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, Murder, She Wrote, Hart to Hart, and Walker, Texas Ranger, to name a but a few. By the late-'90s, Keel retired to his home in Palm Desert, California, where still made public appearances now and again for a tribute or benefit. He is survived by his wife of 34 years, Judy; a son, Gunnar; daughters, Kaija, Kristina and Leslie; 10 grandchildren, and one great-granddaughter.

by Michael T. Toole

Important Milestones on Howard Keel:

1933:
Moved to Southern California at age 16 (date approximate)
Worked as a singing busboy in a Los Angeles cafe
Worked for Douglas Aircraft as a manufacturing representative travelling among various company plants; work included singing; won a first prize award at the Mississippi Valley while on the road; also won an award at the Chicago Music Festival
Began singing career with the American Music Theatre in Pasadena, California
Chosen by Oscar Hammerstein II to perform on Broadway in "Carousel"; succeeded John Raitt in the leading role of Billy Bigelow; also took over the leading role of Curly in "Oklahoma"

1947:
Recreated the role of Curly when he opened the London stage production of "Oklahoma"

1948:
Made feature film debut in a non-singing supporting role in the British crime drama, "The Small Voice"

1950:
Signed by MGM; became instant star as the male lead of "Annie Get Your Gun"

1951:
Provided the offscreen narration for the Western saga, "Across the Wide Missouri", starring Clark Gable

1951:
First film opposite Kathryn Grayson, "Show Boat"

1952:
First leading role in a non-musical, "Desperate Search"

1954:
Made best-remembered film, "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers"

1955:
Last musical starring roles, and last musicals for MGM, "Jupiter's Darling" and "Kismet"

1958:
Went to Britain to play the leading role in the action drama, "Floods of Fear"

1967:
Last leading role, "Red Tomahawk"

1968:
Last feature film appearance for over 20 years, "Arizona Bushwhackers"
Starred on the London stage in the musical "Ambassador"; later brought the role to Broadway (date approximate)
Toured the nightclub circuit, sometimes teaming up with his co-star from three MGM musicals of the 1950s, Kathryn Grayson
Toured in stage productions of musicals and comedies including "Camelot", "Man of La Mancha", "Paint Your Wagon", "I Do! I Do!", "Plaza Suite", "Gigi", "Show Boat", "Kismet", "The Most Happy Fella" and "The Fantasticks"

1977:
Teamed with Jane Powell on record-breaking national theater tour of "South Pacific"

1978:
Reprised screen role of eldest brother Adam in a touring stage version of "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers", opposite original screen co-star Jane Powell
Joined the cast of the CBS primetime serial drama, "Dallas", which had premiered in 1978; played Clayton Farlow

1983:
Recorded first solo album, "And I Love You So"

1994:
Was one of the hosts of the feature compilation documentary, "That's Entertainment III", revisiting the MGM musical from the coming of sound through the late 1950s

Keel was President of the Screen Actors Guild from 1958-1959.

TCM Remembers Howard Keel this Monday, Nov. 15th PLEASE NOTE SCHEDULE CHANGE

TCM will air the following films featuring the late actor Howard Keel this Monday, November 15th : 6:00 AM Callaway Went Thataway (1951) 7:30 AM Ride, Vaquero! (1953) 9:30 AM War Wagon (1967) 11:30 AM "MGM Parade Show #14" (Keel talks with George Murphy about his latest MGM picture "Kismet")(1955) 12:00 PM Showboat (1951) 2:00 PM Kiss Me Kate (1953) 4:00 PM Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954) 6:00 PM Kismet (1955) HOWARD KEEL (1919-2004): Howard Keel, the strapping singer and actor whose glorious baritone took him to stardom in the early '50s in some of MGM's best musicals, including Showboat, Kiss Me Kate and Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, died on November 7 of colon cancer at his home in Palm Desert, California. He was 85. He was born Harry Clifford Leek on April 13, 1919, in Gillespie, Illinois. His father, was a coal miner and his mother, a strict Methodist, forbid the children from enjoying popular entertainments. When his dad died, his mother relocated the family to California when Harry was still a young teenager. After he graduated high school, Keel had a brief stint as a singing busboy, but had not considered a professional career as a vocalist....until one fateful evening in 1939. It was at this time he saw celebrated opera singer, Lawrence Tibbett, at the Hollywood Bowl. Keel was inspired, and he soon began taking voice lessons. Over the next several years, he carefully trained his voice while entering any singing contest he could find. It wasn't long before his talents caught the attention of Rodgers & Hammerstein. In 1946, they signed him to replace John Raitt in the Broadway production of Carousel, changed his name to Howard Keel (His proper surname Leek spelled backwards), and Keel was on his way to international stardom. After his run in Carousel ended, he sailed to London the following year to play the role of Curley in Rodgers & Hammerstein's Oklahoma. He received rave reviews from the London press, and by the time he returned to the United States in 1948, he was ready to make his move into films. Keel made his movie debut in the British thriller, The Small Voice (1948), but it would be his second film, and first for MGM, portraying Frank Butler, Betty Hutton's leading man in Annie Get Your Gun (1950), that sealed his success. Keel's several strengths as a performer: his supple, commanding singing voice; his athletic, 6'4" frame; striking, "matinee-idol" good looks; and his good humored personality made him one of the studios' top leading men over the next few years. Indeed, between 1951-55, Keel could do not wrong with the material he was given: Show Boat (1951), Lovely to Look at (1952), Kiss Me Kate (1953), Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954), and Kismet (1955). Clearly, he was a shining star in this golden era of the MGM musical. By the late '50s, movie musicals began to fade out of fashion, but Keel returned to the stage and had success performing with several touring companies. He made a brief return to films when he was cast as a seaman battling carnivorous plants from outer space in the popular British sci-fi hit, The Day of the Triffids (1962). Television also provided some work, where he guest starred in some of the more popular shows in the late '60s including Run For Your Life, and The Lucy Show. Keel would keep a low profile over the next decade, but he made an amazing comeback in 1981, when he was cast as Clayton Farlow, Ellie Ewing's (Barbara Bel Geddes) second husband in the wildly successful prime time soap, Dallas. Not only did he play the role for ten seasons, but Keel would also be in demand for many other shows throughout the '80s and '90s: The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, Murder, She Wrote, Hart to Hart, and Walker, Texas Ranger, to name a but a few. By the late-'90s, Keel retired to his home in Palm Desert, California, where still made public appearances now and again for a tribute or benefit. He is survived by his wife of 34 years, Judy; a son, Gunnar; daughters, Kaija, Kristina and Leslie; 10 grandchildren, and one great-granddaughter. by Michael T. Toole Important Milestones on Howard Keel: 1933: Moved to Southern California at age 16 (date approximate) Worked as a singing busboy in a Los Angeles cafe Worked for Douglas Aircraft as a manufacturing representative travelling among various company plants; work included singing; won a first prize award at the Mississippi Valley while on the road; also won an award at the Chicago Music Festival Began singing career with the American Music Theatre in Pasadena, California Chosen by Oscar Hammerstein II to perform on Broadway in "Carousel"; succeeded John Raitt in the leading role of Billy Bigelow; also took over the leading role of Curly in "Oklahoma" 1947: Recreated the role of Curly when he opened the London stage production of "Oklahoma" 1948: Made feature film debut in a non-singing supporting role in the British crime drama, "The Small Voice" 1950: Signed by MGM; became instant star as the male lead of "Annie Get Your Gun" 1951: Provided the offscreen narration for the Western saga, "Across the Wide Missouri", starring Clark Gable 1951: First film opposite Kathryn Grayson, "Show Boat" 1952: First leading role in a non-musical, "Desperate Search" 1954: Made best-remembered film, "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" 1955: Last musical starring roles, and last musicals for MGM, "Jupiter's Darling" and "Kismet" 1958: Went to Britain to play the leading role in the action drama, "Floods of Fear" 1967: Last leading role, "Red Tomahawk" 1968: Last feature film appearance for over 20 years, "Arizona Bushwhackers" Starred on the London stage in the musical "Ambassador"; later brought the role to Broadway (date approximate) Toured the nightclub circuit, sometimes teaming up with his co-star from three MGM musicals of the 1950s, Kathryn Grayson Toured in stage productions of musicals and comedies including "Camelot", "Man of La Mancha", "Paint Your Wagon", "I Do! I Do!", "Plaza Suite", "Gigi", "Show Boat", "Kismet", "The Most Happy Fella" and "The Fantasticks" 1977: Teamed with Jane Powell on record-breaking national theater tour of "South Pacific" 1978: Reprised screen role of eldest brother Adam in a touring stage version of "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers", opposite original screen co-star Jane Powell Joined the cast of the CBS primetime serial drama, "Dallas", which had premiered in 1978; played Clayton Farlow 1983: Recorded first solo album, "And I Love You So" 1994: Was one of the hosts of the feature compilation documentary, "That's Entertainment III", revisiting the MGM musical from the coming of sound through the late 1950s Keel was President of the Screen Actors Guild from 1958-1959.

Quotes

Trivia