Strawberry Road


1h 57m 1991

Brief Synopsis

The story of two Japanese brothers who immigrate to California from Japan in the 1960s.

Film Details

Release Date
1991
Location
Salinas County, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Monterey, California, USA; New Jersey, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 57m

Synopsis

The story of two Japanese brothers who immigrate to California from Japan in the 1960s.

Crew

Gene Abel

Art Director

John Aboglia

Location Manager

Kevin Aiello

Caterer

Scilla Andreen-hernandez

Costumes

Bob Avilla

Location Coordinator

Gloria Belanski

Other

Kenichi Benitani

Sound

Jill Bennett

Hair

Jill Bennett

Makeup

Frank Bertolino

Property Master

Dennis Bishop

Line Producer

Momo Brannen

Casting

Sean Britt

Assistant Camera Operator

Jeff Buchannan

Unit Production Manager

John Burke

Assistant Camera Operator

Ron Cacas

Production Assistant

Rocky Capella

Stunt Coordinator

Fred Carlin

Music

Jerry Carlton

Driver

Richard Courtney

Other

Richard Courtney

Assistant

William Curtin

Special Effects Coordinator

Brian Daly

Location Assistant

Bloz Diaz

Construction

Michael Donner

Production Accountant

Debra Dotts

Assistant Camera Operator

Fred Dresch

Assistant Director

Dave Drysdale

Assistant Camera Operator

Mark Ebenhoch

Special Effects Assistant

Gregg Edler

Props

Jose Espinoza

Casting Associate

Kelly Flood

Grip

Ira Friedlander

Accounting Assistant

Kazuhiko Fujiwara

Production Designer

Yuuji Fukuzawa

Set Decorator

Adrienne Gruben

Casting Associate

Bert Guthrie

Camera Operator

Reonne Haslett

Casting

Peter Helm

Transportation Captain

Scilla Hernandez

Costumes

Amy Hill

Other

Eiji Hirokawa

Boom Operator

Ron Holmstrom

Transportation Coordinator

Cathe Hoogner

Wardrobe Assistant

John C Hudson

Driver

Fran Hughes

Dolly Grip

Hiroya Igawa

Assistant Director

Yoshimi Ishikawa

Book As Source Material

Taro Isusaka

Photography

Hideaki Ito

Other

Ann Job

Art Department Coordinator

Brook Johnson

Grip

Kayoko Takeda Johnson

Other

Mike Johnson

Caterer

Cheryl Jones

Production Assistant

Dennis Junt

Driver

Tomohiro Kaiyama

Producer

Yudai Kato

Director Of Photography

Shinjirou Kayama

Executive Producer

Kelly Kiernan

Assistant Director

Kristi Kildall

Production Assistant

Kelly Kirby

Special Effects Assistant

Kazuto Kunishige

Assistant Director

James Laclair

Assistant Director

Mark Lajoie

Driver

Rick Larsen

Other

Edward Lonnegren

Driver

Chieko Makino

Script Supervisor

Lisa Matsukawa

Production Coordinator

Nicholas Meeks

Driver

Junichi Mimura

Producer

Mark Moller

Driver

Hiroyuki Momozawa

Assistant Director

Yuki Nakamura

Assistant Art Director

Patty Newton

Assistant

Mike Nichoson

Other

Midori Onuma

Makeup

Midori Onuma

Hair

Jose Luis Orozco

Construction

Mike Painter

Driver

Stacey Polson

Makeup Assistant

Stacey Polson

Hair Assistant

Wendy Range Rao

Wardrobe Supervisor

Kenny Ratliff

Electrician

Debby Resnick

Production Assistant

David Ronsen

Production Assistant

Yuuki Satoh

Consultant

Bill Schwarz

Gaffer

Lance Simco

Construction Coordinator

Lauree Slattery

On-Set Dresser

Rod Spencer

Production Assistant

Robert Stewart

Craft Service

Akiro Suzuki

Editor

Noriaky Suzuki

Other

Sam Wheden

Other

Kevin Whitlow

Dolly Grip

Jim Woods

Assistant Camera Operator

Nobuo Yamada

Screenplay

Hiroko Yamazaki

Other

Kristi Zufall

Production Assistant

Film Details

Release Date
1991
Location
Salinas County, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Monterey, California, USA; New Jersey, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 57m

Articles

Pat Morita (1932-2005)


Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73.

He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor.

His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy.

He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles.

Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype.

However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality.

He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities.

He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73. He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy. He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles. Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype. However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality. He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities. He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Began shooting April 30, 1990.

Completed shooting July 2, 1990.