That Summer of White Roses


1h 43m 1989

Brief Synopsis

During the last summer of World War II, a Yugoslavian lifeguard, who has never managed to rescue anybody, saves the life of the commandant of a German garrison.

Film Details

Also Known As
Ete des roses blanches, L', L' Ete des roses blanches, Summer of White Roses, The, White Rose, White Roses
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1989
Location
Yugoslavia

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m

Synopsis

During the last summer of World War II, a Yugoslavian lifeguard, who has never managed to rescue anybody, saves the life of the commandant of a German garrison.

Crew

Pavle Balenovic

Stunts

John Bateman

Adr Editor

Davorka Borojevic

Location Manager

Jed Brendon-tullett

Production Assistant

Miroslav Buhin

Stunts

Darko Bujas

Stunts

J N R Campbell

Music

J N R Campbell

Music Arranger

Mladen Cosic

Stunts

Pavle Despalj

Music Conductor

Brendan Donnison

Casting

Mike Dowson

Sound Mixer

Mike Dyson

Foley Editor

Maria Dziewulska

Makeup

Arnie Fishman

Coproducer

Brian Gascoigne

Other

Susan George

Executive Producer

Damir F German

Editor

Richard Gillinson

Music

Rajko Grlic

Screenplay

Gordana Hovezak

Production Coordinator

Gerry Humphreys

Sound

Zvonimir Ilijic

Assistant Director

Vjera Ivankovic

Costume Designer

Sime Jagarinec

Stunts

Kemal Jahic

Stunts

Dinka Jericevic

Production Designer

Suleiman Kapic

Executive Producer

Vlado Keleuva

Stunts

Chris Kelly

Associate Editor

Chris Kelly

Music Editor

Mladen Koceic

Production Supervisor

Louis Kramer

Sound

Paul Lichtman

Coproducer

Simon Maccorkindale

Producer

Simon Maccorkindale

Screenplay

Zdrauko Mihalic

Producer

Slobodan Milakovic

Stunts

Dragutin Nusshol

Production Manager

Mike O'donnell

Music

Mike O'donnell

Music Arranger

Arsen Anton Ostojic

Assistant Director

Zoran Parat

Assistant Director

Borislav Pekic

Screenplay

Borislav Pekic

Source Material (From Novel)

Melanija Petrovic

Stunts

Slaven Petrovic

Stunts

Drazen Pintaric

Location Manager

Tomislav Pinter

Director Of Photography

Steve Price

Music

Jim Roddan

Sound Editor

Ljudevit Sikic

Assistant Camera Operator

Mladen Skalec

Sound

Zdravko Smojver

Special Effects Supervisor

Anica Svilar

Wardrobe

Aldo Toncic

Stunts

Bill Trent

Post-Production Supervisor

Slobdan Trninic

Assistant Camera Operator

Tom Vukusic

Stunts

Igor Zavrsnik

Pyrotechnics

Brane Zivkovic

Music

Film Details

Also Known As
Ete des roses blanches, L', L' Ete des roses blanches, Summer of White Roses, The, White Rose, White Roses
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1989
Location
Yugoslavia

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger


ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Tcm Remembers - Rod Steiger

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1990

Released in United States July 26, 1990

Released in United States May 14, 1989

Released in United States October 4, 1989

Released in United States on Video November 7, 1990

Released in United States September 1989

Shown at Cannes Film Festival (out of competition) May 14, 1989.

Shown at Goodwill Film Festival, Seattle July 26, 1990.

Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival April 30-May 13, 1990.

Shown at San Sebastian Film Festival September 15-23, 1989.

Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival (in competition) October 4, 1989.

Began shooting July 23, 1988.

Released in United States 1990 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles International Film Festival (West European Cinema) April 19 - May 3, 1990.)

Released in United States May 14, 1989 (Shown at Cannes Film Festival (out of competition) May 14, 1989.)

Released in United States July 26, 1990 (Shown at Goodwill Film Festival, Seattle July 26, 1990.)

Released in United States September 1989 (Shown at San Sebastian Film Festival September 15-23, 1989.)

Released in United States 1990 (Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival April 30-May 13, 1990.)

Released in United States October 4, 1989 (Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival (in competition) October 4, 1989.)

Released in United States on Video November 7, 1990