The Whip


1917

Brief Synopsis

The story of the training of a racehorse, the Whip, of the amnesiac nobleman who loves the horse, and of the villains who attempt to keep it from racing.

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 1917
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paragon Films, Inc.
Distribution Company
State Rights
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Whip by Cecil Raleigh and Henry Hamilton (London, 9 Sep 1909).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Synopsis

Bookmaker Joe Kelly is in league with Baron Sartoris and his mistress, Mrs. D'Aquila, both guests in the home of Judge Beverley. Kelly has designs on Beverley's daughter Diana, who is loved by Herbert Brancaster. Conceiving of a plan to ruin his rival, Kelly forges a check of Brancaster's and then uses the Baron to convince Judge Beverley that Brancaster is worthless. When Harry Anson, a jockey in the employ of the Beverleys, discovers that "The Whip," an uncontrollable but swift horse, has become docile and therefore will win the handicap event in the coming races at Saratoga, Brancaster learns Anson's secret and wagers twenty to one with Kelly on The Whip. Meanwhile Sartoris, who has compromised Harry's sister Myrtle, threatens to make her dishonor public unless Myrtle's brother throws the race. After Myrtle refuses to make the deal, Sartoris plans to wreck the car in which the horse is being shipped to the track. Brancaster learns of the scheme and races to the car just in time to release The Whip. Kelly and Sartoris' villainy is thus exposed, and Brancaster wins his bet as well as the Beverleys' respect.

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 1917
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paragon Films, Inc.
Distribution Company
State Rights
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Whip by Cecil Raleigh and Henry Hamilton (London, 9 Sep 1909).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Produced in 1916, this film was initially released in the spring of 1917 then withdrawn from the market because of the uncertainty due to the war. It was then re-released in fall 1917. According to publicity for the film, it included a train wreck filmed in Maryland which cost over $25,000 to shoot. The play was a famous Drury Lane melodrama. First National Pictures remade the film in 1928; Charles J. Brabin directed and Dorothy Mackaill and Ralph Forbes starred (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30).