Too Many Kisses


60m 1925
Too Many Kisses

Film Details

Release Date
Jan 11, 1925
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Famous Players--Lasky
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "A Maker of Gestures" by John Monk Saunders in Cosmopolitan Magazine (Apr 1923).

Technical Specs

Duration
60m
Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
5,759ft (6 reels)

Synopsis

Richard Gaylord always puts pleasure before business, so when his father learns that Basque women will not marry outside of their race, he sends him to Spain to keep him away from his numerous feminine admirers. In a Basque village, Richard meets and falls in love with Yvonne Hurja, whose affections are claimed by Julio, a captain in the Civil Guard. Julio challenges Richard to a duel, but Yvonne secures the American's promise not to fight. Richard is later kidnaped by Julio's men and taken to the mountains; Julio then goes to claim Yvonne's hand in marriage, but Richard escapes and confronts him at a festival. Julio throws a knife at Richard but misses; Richard then trounces him in a fight. At that moment, Richard's father appears and is greatly pleased with his son's grit. He approves of Richard's love for Yvonne and gives him a half interest in the family business.

Film Details

Release Date
Jan 11, 1925
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Famous Players--Lasky
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "A Maker of Gestures" by John Monk Saunders in Cosmopolitan Magazine (Apr 1923).

Technical Specs

Duration
60m
Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
5,759ft (6 reels)

Articles

Too Many Kisses


Richard Dix stars as an American Casanova in Too Many Kisses (1925), a romantic comedy that pits Dix against William Powell over the affections of a local girl (Frances Howard) in France's remote Basque country. For many film buffs, however, this silent comedy is best known as the first screen appearance of Harpo Marx and the earliest screen appearance of any of the Marx Brothers. Harpo was appearing with his brothers in their first Broadway show, I'll Say She Is, when he filmed his supporting role as the "Village Peter Pan." According to Harpo, his part was cut down in the finished feature. "It seems the cutters had been at work on the film and they hadn't figured my acting amounted to much," he remarked to a journalist in 1929. It's also Harpo's only "speaking" role on the big screen, even if his only line is written in an intertitle. For the record, his line is "You sure you can't move?" Film critic Mordaunt Hall, writing in The New York Times upon its March 1925 release, found the film "constantly amusing light entertainment, just the thing to make one forget the cold wind and changeable weather."

The film was thought lost for decades, and even after a print was discovered in 1971 it remained (apart from brief fragments) unavailable for public viewing. Film Preservation Society spearheaded a restoration in partnership with Paramount Pictures and the Library of Congress in 2020 and commissioned Harpo's son, composer Bill Marx, to create the musical score. "I had never done any music for a silent film," explained the younger Marx. "So my dad’s first silent is also mine."

by Sean Axmaker

Sources:
Movie Comedy Teams, Leonard Maltin. Plume, 1985.
"The Screen: Too Many Kisses," Mordaunt Hall. The New York Times, March 3, 1925.
"Too Many Kisses," Mikael Uhlin. Marxology, accessed October 20, 2020.
"Too Many Kisses," unsigned article. Film Preservation Society website, October 2, 2020.
AFI Catalog of Feature Films

Too Many Kisses

Too Many Kisses

Richard Dix stars as an American Casanova in Too Many Kisses (1925), a romantic comedy that pits Dix against William Powell over the affections of a local girl (Frances Howard) in France's remote Basque country. For many film buffs, however, this silent comedy is best known as the first screen appearance of Harpo Marx and the earliest screen appearance of any of the Marx Brothers. Harpo was appearing with his brothers in their first Broadway show, I'll Say She Is, when he filmed his supporting role as the "Village Peter Pan." According to Harpo, his part was cut down in the finished feature. "It seems the cutters had been at work on the film and they hadn't figured my acting amounted to much," he remarked to a journalist in 1929. It's also Harpo's only "speaking" role on the big screen, even if his only line is written in an intertitle. For the record, his line is "You sure you can't move?" Film critic Mordaunt Hall, writing in The New York Times upon its March 1925 release, found the film "constantly amusing light entertainment, just the thing to make one forget the cold wind and changeable weather."The film was thought lost for decades, and even after a print was discovered in 1971 it remained (apart from brief fragments) unavailable for public viewing. Film Preservation Society spearheaded a restoration in partnership with Paramount Pictures and the Library of Congress in 2020 and commissioned Harpo's son, composer Bill Marx, to create the musical score. "I had never done any music for a silent film," explained the younger Marx. "So my dad’s first silent is also mine."by Sean AxmakerSources:Movie Comedy Teams, Leonard Maltin. Plume, 1985."The Screen: Too Many Kisses," Mordaunt Hall. The New York Times, March 3, 1925."Too Many Kisses," Mikael Uhlin. Marxology, accessed October 20, 2020."Too Many Kisses," unsigned article. Film Preservation Society website, October 2, 2020.AFI Catalog of Feature Films

Quotes

Trivia

This is the only "speaking" role of Harpo Marx in his entire cinema career. Alas, being this a silent movie, his line ("You sure you can't move?") appeared written on the screen.