Ridin' Thru


55m 1934

Brief Synopsis

Dad Brooks is in financial trouble and needs to sell a lot of horses. But they are being rustled and needing help, he sends for Tom. Tom looks for the rustlers but eventually realizes that someone is using a wild horse to do the rustling. He finds the secret entrance used by the rustlers to hide the horses but soon finds himself a prisoner.

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 15, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Reliable Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
State Rights; William Steiner
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
55m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

Cowboy Tom Saunders and his companion, Barney, ride toward the Bar-L-Guest Dude Ranch, where they have been promised jobs by owner Dan Brooks. On the way, they see a wild white stallion leading a pack of mares and follow the pack to a ravine. Before they get very close, however, a man shoots at them, and although suspicious, Tom and Barney continue on the road until they come across an abandoned car. To prevent an accident, Tom moves the car, which he soon learns is owned by the peppery Dolores Brooks, Dan's niece, who scolds him soundly for meddling. At the ranch, which Dan has been forced to turn into a "dude" operation to avoid bankruptcy due to excessive horse thievery, Tom and Barney confront Winthrop, the crooked foreman, who knows that they were investigating the wild stallion. Dan, however, insists on hiring Tom and Barney and later confers with them about his devastating horse rustling problem. After promising to find the thieves, Tom rides back toward the ravine and sees Dolores' horse chasing after the white stallion. Tom rescues a fainting Dolores from her horse and then rides off to find the stallion. Later, at a costume party, Dolores thanks Tom for saving her and confesses her attraction to him. At the same time, Barney, who is guarding a corral of mares, is knocked out by the thieves, who free the horses to the stallion. Winthrop then tells Dan that he has caught the thieves and has Tom and Barney arrested. Tom, however, overwhelms the sheriff and his men and, with Barney, follows the stallion's trail. Aided by Tom's deft horse, Tom and Barney escape capture by the thieves and eventually expose Winthrop and bring the outlaws to justice. After calling Dolores his "sweetheart," Tom prepares to leave with Barney, but promises to return soon.

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 15, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Reliable Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
State Rights; William Steiner
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
55m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Although the viewed print included a copyright statement, the title was not found in the copyright records. The March 15, 1934 release date was taken from an advertisement in the 1934 Film Daily Year Book and May not be exact. No other contemporary release information has been found, but modern sources give the release date as November 26, 1934. Ridin' Thru was the first of eighteen films that Tom Tyler made with Bernard B. Ray and Harry S. Webb. William Steiner distributed the first twelve of the series and, according to modern sources, provided production money for all twelve. Steiner released the films on a state rights basis, with different exhibitors, such as Marcy and Astor, handling the pictures in different parts of the United States. In 1935, Reliable Pictures Corp. succeeded Steiner as distributor. Henri Samuels was a pseudonym used by western director Harry Webb. In the film, the character played by Lafe McKee is called "Dan," although the onscreen credits list him as "Elmer." Bud Osborne's character name was not readable on the viewed print, but modern sources credit him in the role of sheriff. Modern sources add Colin Chase (Henchman), Jayne Regan (Ranch guest) and Buck Morgan (Cowboy) to the cast. In addition, modern sources credit Harry S. Webb (Henri Samuels) as associate producer.