The Riddle: Woman


1920

Film Details

Release Date
Oct 3, 1920
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Associated Exhibitors, Inc.
Distribution Company
Pathé Exchange, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Riddle: Woman by Carl Jacobi, adapted by Charlotte E. Wells and Dorothy Donnelly (New York, 23 Oct 1918).

Synopsis

After her attempted suicide over an unhappy love affair is thwarted by Larz Olrik, Lilla Gravert leaves Denmark for New York and marries her savior. At their fifth wedding anniversary celebration Lilla meets Eric Helsingor, the man who betrayed her. Helsingor now demands money in return for his silence and Lilla complies. When Lilla and Larz adopt a baby boy referred to them by their lifelong friend Kristine, Lilla discovers that the child is actually Kristine and Helsingor's. Larz suspects that Helsingor is blackmailing Kristine, but when the latter is injured in a fight, Larz takes him home to recover. There Helsingor meets Marie Meyer, the daughter of an old mentor of Lilla, and attempts to convince the girl to elope with him. Becoming enraged at Helsingor's repeated offenses, Lilla attacks him and they struggle until Kristine shoots Helsingor and then herself. Lilla insists that Larz read the blackmailer's letters, but he throws them into the fire instead, eliminating all barriers between husband and wife.

Film Details

Release Date
Oct 3, 1920
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Associated Exhibitors, Inc.
Distribution Company
Pathé Exchange, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play The Riddle: Woman by Carl Jacobi, adapted by Charlotte E. Wells and Dorothy Donnelly (New York, 23 Oct 1918).

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The play was originally written in Danish. Some exterior scenes were shot at Marblehead, MA. Interiors were filmed in the old Thanhouser studio at New Rochelle, NY. An early news item indicated that the film began with a prologue showing Leonardo da Vinci finishing the Mona Lisa and then dropping on a sofa baffled by his own creation. As no review mentioned this scene, it has not been determined whether it was included in the released film.