Oh, Lady, Lady


1920

Film Details

Release Date
Jan 1920
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Realart Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Realart Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the musical comedy Oh, Lady Lady! , book and lyrics by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse, music by Jerome Kern (New York, 1 Feb 1918).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Film Length
4,212ft (5 reels)

Synopsis

Having long ago left his country sweetheart, May Barber, Willoughby Finch is about to marry Molly Farringdon when a simple phone message from May leads him to the mistaken belief that she plans to disrupt the wedding. May, now an actress known by her stage name of Rilla Rooke, meets and falls in love with Finch's best man, Hale Underwood, on the train taking her home from a successful tour. Learning from a friend that Finch is in distress over a vamp's threat to ruin his wedding, May offers to pose as Finch's lover to drive the vamp away. Her appearance at Finch's wedding rehearsal, however, only confirms Finch's worst suspicions, since May and the vamp that he fears are the same. May's charade also alienates Underwood, but she clarifies the situation that evening at a jazz party at Underwood's apartment, and both pairs of lovers are reconciled.

Film Details

Release Date
Jan 1920
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Realart Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Realart Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the musical comedy Oh, Lady Lady! , book and lyrics by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse, music by Jerome Kern (New York, 1 Feb 1918).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Film Length
4,212ft (5 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

A silent film version of one of the famous "Princess Theatre musicals" with music by Jerome Kern and lyrics by P.G. Wodehouse, this was never redone as a sound film. The song "Bill", which was later inserted into "Show Boat" and made into a song classic by Helen Morgan, originally came from the stage version of "Oh, Lady, Lady!" (The lyrics to "Bill", however, were much altered for "Show Boat").

Notes

Contemporary trade journals punctuate the film's title in a variety of ways: Oh Lady, Lady; Oh, Lady! Lady!; and Oh, Lady, Lady! are some of the other forms that appeared.