Rose of the Rancho


1914

Brief Synopsis

Esra Kincaid takes land by force and, having taken the Espinoza land, his sights are set on the Castro rancho. US government agent Kearney holds him off till the cavalry shows up and he can declare his love for Juanita "The Rose of the Rancho."

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 30, 1914
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Rose of the Rancho by Richard Walton Tully and David Belasco (New York, 27 Nov 1906).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
5 reels

Synopsis

In 1850 the Federal Government sends secret agent Kearney to investigate land fraud in California among the Spanish owned rancheros. Ezra Kincaid, a land jumper, goes to Señor Espinoza's ranch to seize the property, and in the raid Espinoza and his daughter Isabella die. Meanwhile, Kearney sees Juanita, the "Rose" of the Castro rancho, and they become mutually attracted, although Juanita is engaged to Don Luis del Torre. When Kearney discovers that Kincaid plans to seize the Castro ranch, he warns Juanita and her mother, but Señora Castro-Kenton does not believe "The Gringo," and refuses to register her ranch. At Juanita's betrothal dance, Kearney is able to coerce Kincaid into delaying his raid, and the federal troops arrive just in time. In the end, the ranch is saved, and Kearney and Juanita are married.

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 30, 1914
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Rose of the Rancho by Richard Walton Tully and David Belasco (New York, 27 Nov 1906).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
5 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Moving Picture World mentions in a news item that this was the first Lasky-Belasco feature. A photograph of the San Fernando mission in Southern California, which was used as a location site for the film, appears in New York Dramatic Mirror October 14, 1914, p. 28. Modern sources list Wilfred Buckland as the film's art director. Richard Walton Tully assisted in the production. Rose of the Rancho was remade in 1936 by Paramount by Marion Gering and starred John Boles (see below)