Let's Get a Divorce


1918

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 29, 1918
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Distribution Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Divorçons by Victorien Sardou, Émile de Najac (Paris, 6 Dec 1880).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Film Length
5 reels

Synopsis

In order to relieve the monotony of her life in a French convent, Cyprienne Marcey indulges in romantic fantasies to such a degree that when her friend Yvonne's brother, Henri de Prunelles, falls in love with Cyprienne, Yvonne suggests that he abduct her from the convent garden rather than stage a conventional wedding. This exciting arrangement pleases Cyprienne, who willingly consents to the elopement, but after Henri has resumed his work as a writer, his young wife becomes restless. Consequently, when Henri's foolish cousin Adhemar flirts with Cyprienne, she convinces herself that she loves him and asks her husband for a divorce. Determined to teach his impulsive wife a lesson, Henri calmly gives his consent and then feigns interest in another woman while she entertains Adhemar. Because her meetings with Adhemar are no longer clandestine, Cyprienne loses interest in him until finally, she begs her husband's forgiveness and settles happily into married life.

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 29, 1918
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Distribution Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Divorçons by Victorien Sardou, Émile de Najac (Paris, 6 Dec 1880).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Film Length
5 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Divorçons was produced in Germany and other countries under the title Cyprienne. It seems to have been produced in the English language under both titles. Variety credits William Marshall as the film's cinematographer, but most other contemporary sources credit Young. Many other adaptations of Sardou's play have been filmed: 1915's Divorcons, produced by Biograph and distributed by General Film Co.; 1925's Kiss Me Again, a Warner Bros. film directed by Ernst Lubitsch (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.2896); 1927's Don't Tell the Wife, another Warner Bros. version (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.1411); and 1941's That Uncertain Feeling, released by United Artists and also directed by Lubitsch.