Harmony Trail


57m 1944

Brief Synopsis

Sent to investigate a payroll robbery, Marshall Rocky meets his old friends Ken, Eddie, and Max. He has the serial numbers and when Pop puts on his medicine show they get one of the bills. This enables Ken to see through Sorrell's scheme that threw the blame on an innocent rancher and he sets out to prove it.

Film Details

Also Known As
White Stallion
Release Date
Jan 1944
Premiere Information
release: 1944 or 1947
Production Company
Astor Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Western Attractions, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
57m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
4,897ft

Synopsis

After a band of outlaws robs a Nevada bank of $30,000, U.S. Marshal Rocky Camron is assigned to investigate the crime. Just outside the Nevada state line, meanwhile, medicine show proprietor Pop Martin and his daughter Ann are being chased by a sheriff for nonpayment of a hotel bill when their old car breaks down. Seeing the pair in distress, three unsuspecting cowboys--Ken Maynard, Eddie Dean and Max Terhune--ride to their rescue and push their "flivver" over the line just ahead of the sheriff. Although his crime is exposed by the angry sheriff, Pop gains sympathy from Ken, Eddie and Max by explaining that he is broke because he has "lost his talent" for selling his elixir. Ken, a sharpshooter, Eddie, a singer, and Max, who performs ventriloquism with his dummy Elmer, offer to join the medicine show until Pop is solvent again. In a nearby town, meanwhile, Jim Sorrell, the leader of the bank robbing gang, confers with his men about the stolen cash, whose serial numbers are known to the authorities. Aware that Rocky is on his way, and that he always rides a white stallion, Sorrell orders his men to ambush the marshal on the road outside town. The outlaws fire on Ken, who is the first man on a white horse they see, but, after a long chase, Ken outrides and outsmarts them. Ken then makes a planned rendezvous with his old friend Rocky, who explains his mission and enlists the performers' help in cracking the case. In town, meanwhile, Sorrell, a respected cattle merchant, sells rancher Jeff Hodges $25,000 worth of cattle, insisting that he pay him in small cash denominations. He then deposits the same amount in stolen cash into his bank account and distributes the remaining $5,000 among his men, instructing them not to spend it until he gives the word. Soon after, however, Bronco, one of Sorrell's men, uses one of the stolen bills to buy some of Pop's elixir. By the time it is discovered by Rocky, however, Pop has forgotten Bronco's face. Rocky and Ken then learn from the local sheriff about Sorrell's $25,000 deposit. When confronted, Sorrell implicates Hodges, but at his ranch, Hodges soon convinces Rocky and the boys of his innocence. As Rocky and Hodges talk, Sorrell and his gang surround the ranch house. Fearing for Hodges' safety, Rocky arrests him and, while he and Ken sneak the rancher out the back door, Eddie and Max distract the outlaws. Before Hodges can talk from his jail cell, however, Sorrell has him killed, then tries to convince Ken and Rocky that he committed suicide. As Ken and Rocky are dismissing Sorrell's explanation, Pop rushes in to the jail, having finally remembered that Bronco gave him the stolen bill. Thus exposed, Sorrell pulls a gun on the lawmen and, after revealing that his men have surrounded the jailhouse, flees. Sorrell goes to his office to retrieve the remaining stolen money from his safe and catches Ken breaking into it. Suddenly overwhelmed with concern about Ann, Pop, meanwhile, throws open the jailhouse door and instigates a gunfight with Sorrell's men. After all of Sorrell's men are shot down, Ken overpowers Sorrell and knocks him unconscious. Later, Ken, Rocky, Max and Eddie bid the Martins goodbye and ride off to their next adventure.

Film Details

Also Known As
White Stallion
Release Date
Jan 1944
Premiere Information
release: 1944 or 1947
Production Company
Astor Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Western Attractions, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
57m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
4,897ft

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Although the onscreen credits include a 1944 copyright statement, the film is not included in copyright records. No other contemporary information about a possible 1944 release has been found. The Exhibitor and Variety reviewed the film as White Stallion in 1947. The The Exhibitor review billed the picture as Ken Maynard's "comeback" film. Maynard, who was still active in films when Harmony Trail was produced, had been absent from the screen for two years when the film was in distribution in 1947. Modern sources credit Frances Kavanaugh, not Frank Simpson, with the screenplay, and credit Simpson with the screen story.