The Fabulous Joe


1h 52m 1947

Brief Synopsis

To quote a Marine D.I. in San Diego or John Wayne in several movies, "Listen up, we ain't going to plow this ground twice." In 1947, Hal Roach made a film called "Curly", which was an expanded version of 1930's "Our Gang" short "Teacher's Pet", with Frances Rafferty and Larry Olsen taking the roles played by June Marlowe and Jackie Cooper in the original short. Hal Roach also made a film called "The Fabulous Joe", basically about a drunk, a talking dog, gangsters and Marie Wilson running around in her skivvies. The two films, intended as bottom-half of a double feature, were released about two weeks apart, with "Curly" going out first. "The Fabulous Joe" came about two weeks later. At the same time, the two films were stitched together and offered, with the combined running time of 112 minutes, to exhibitors who didn't play double features. The film listed on this page, "Hal Roach's Comedy Carnival", is the result. "Curly" was an attempt by Hal Roach, who no longer owned the rights to "Our Gang" (aka "The Little Rascals") to create a version of "Our Gang" with a new set of kids, which would be known as "Curly and His Gang", and would be feature-length films in Cinecolor. "Curly" was the first one in the series and was followed in 1948 by "Who Killed "Doc" Robbin" with the same kids from "Curly" playing the same roles. Later, "Curly" and "Who Killed 'Doc' Robbin" were packaged together as "The Adventures of Curly and His Gang" for theatres and later sold to televison, and there are sources who keep adding the adult cast from the "Doc Robbin" film (Don Castle, Virginia Grey, Claire DuBrey, Paul Hurst and others)incorrectly to the cast of "Curly." The fun part of "Hal Roach's Comedy Carnival" is that it is comprised of two films that are about as opposite of each other as films can be. "The Fabulous Joe" is a screwball comedy filled with double entendre dialogue and scenes and as "Adult" as a film of the 40's could be and still get PCA approval. "Curly", as mentioned, is "Our Gang" updated and in color.

Film Details

Also Known As
The Hal Roach Comedy Carnival Part II
Release Date
Aug 29, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Hal Roach Studios, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Cinecolor)
Film Length
5,317ft

Synopsis

After twenty years of marriage, Milo and Emily Terkel are in the middle of divorce proceedings when Milo explains to the court how their marriage fell apart: The previous July on his anniversary, Milo returns home from his bank job carrying an expensive necklace for his wife. She is out visiting Mrs. Belmont, a society lady, however, and he and his dog, Joseph McMasters, are forced to have dinner at a club. At the club, Milo is hit while defending a young woman named Gorgeous Gilmore, who is admiring his wife's necklace. When Milo laments to Joe, the dog "tells" him to be a brute like Humphrey Bogart. When Milo returns home, he learns that his spendthrift daughter Debbie is going to marry Mrs. Belmont's son Cornelius. After snidely remarking that Cornelius will be "broke in a month" if he marries Debbie, Milo is threatened by Emily's freeloading brother, George Baxter, who has been living with them for ten years. Milo bravely tells George to "shut up," then ends up sleeping with Joe. The next evening, Milo returns home to find a note from Emily, stating that the family can no longer tolerate his "brutal and abusive behavior," and that she will be at her sister's until he apologizes. When Milo accidentally meets Gorgeous again in a park, Joe pushes her into a pond so that she will have to go home with Milo. At home, Joe tosses Gorgeous' clothes out a window, forcing Milo to buy her new clothes. Although George reports Milo's "infidelity" to Emily, she has a change of heart and apologizes to Milo over the telephone. He asserts that from now on he will be the head of the household. Meanwhile, Gorgeous' boyfriend Louie meets her at Milo's apartment and, in anger, rips off her new dress, forcing her to hide in a slip as Emily returns. After Debbie, Cornelius, George and Mr. and Mrs. Belmont arrive and discover Gorgeous, chaos ensues while they try to hide her, and Joe starts a fire so that Milo can sneak Gorgeous out of the building. Later, Milo tells his lawyer that his dog has been talking to him and pushed Gorgeous into his life to make Emily jealous. Back in the courtroom, it is decided that Milo has become mentally unbalanced from overwork and an extremely unhappy situation at home. Emily then decides to kick George out of the house and take her husband to Maine for a rest cure.

Film Details

Also Known As
The Hal Roach Comedy Carnival Part II
Release Date
Aug 29, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Hal Roach Studios, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Cinecolor)
Film Length
5,317ft

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The Fabulous Joe was originally released as Part II of The Hal Roach Comedy Carnival, which had a total running time of 112 minutes. Part I was Curley. Although each part was copyrighted separately, both certificates were issued on the same day. The film ends with "Joe" saying to the camera, "Don't be silly, you know dogs can't talk!" The Fabulous Joe was the first film Bebe Daniels produced for Hal Roach. This film was one of Roach's "streamlined features," a series of short comedies intended to fill the second half of a double bill. The first streamlined feature was the 1941 film Tanks a Million (see below).