Jiggs and Maggie in Court


1h 11m 1948

Film Details

Release Date
Dec 12, 1948
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Monogram Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Monogram Distributing Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the comic strip "Bringing Up Father" created by George McManus, owned and copyrighted by King Features Syndicate, Inc. (12 Jan 1913--).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 11m

Synopsis

Maggie, an aspiring New York socialite, is right at home examining an expensive Ming vase in a posh department store. Things quickly change, however, when she becomes enraged by comments made by some salespeople and customers about her likeness to the George McManus comic strip shrew named Maggie. After breaking the Ming vase in a show of anger, Maggie goes to a bakery, where she again is met with comments about her likeness to the comic strip character. This time, the insulted Maggie starts a pie-throwing fight, which lands her in court to answer to charges of creating a public disturbance. Even the judge presiding over her trial cannot resist commenting on her likeness to the rolling pin-wielding, pie-throwing Maggie of the funny papers. When Maggie is sentenced to three months in jail, her milquetoast husband Jiggs and his tavern pal Dugan manage to convince the judge to put Maggie on probation instead. The change in sentence puts Maggie under the direct supervision of her husband, a situation that Jiggs is all too happy to exploit by going to his favorite watering hole, Dinty Moore's, whenever he likes. One day, Maggie is visited by an influential socialite who informs her that her application to join an exclusive social club has been rejected because of her recent court appearance. Unable to bear the stigma, Maggie marches over to George McManus' office and demands that he stop drawing her in his comic strip. Maggie is stunned when McManus readily signs a written agreement to stop using her likeness in his work. However, when she reads the fine print stating that the agreement does not take effect until 1999, she becomes enraged and plans a lawsuit against him. While Maggie concerns herself with her reputation, Jiggs throws a party at their apartment. During the party, Dinty is fooled into thinking that Jiggs, dressed in women's clothes, is Dinty's long-lost love. Maggie enters the apartment at the height of the merriment and both she and Dinty, who has discovered Jiggs's prank, attack him. Maggie's lawsuit against McManus results in a trial, which McManus wins by proving that Maggie could not possibly have been the model for his character because she is too young. After the trial, McManus makes amends with Maggie by showing her pictures of the women who inspired Maggie's character, which include pictures of Cleopatra, Madame de Pompadour and Marie Antoinette.

Film Details

Release Date
Dec 12, 1948
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Monogram Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Monogram Distributing Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the comic strip "Bringing Up Father" created by George McManus, owned and copyrighted by King Features Syndicate, Inc. (12 Jan 1913--).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 11m

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Onscreen credits note that the "Bringing Up Father" comic strip appeared "regularly in Puck, the comic weekly." Although Eddie Cline is listed in copyright records, a Monogram studio production sheet and other contemporary sources as the film's co-director, only Barney Gerard is credited on screen. Contemporary sources offer conflicting information as to who played the "Bartender" and "Mr. Baker." While the Monogram production sheet and Daily Variety credit Chester Clute with the role of "Mr. Baker," the CBCS credits George Meader with the role. Similarly, the production sheet lists Fred Kelsey as "Bartender", while the CBCS credits Mike Pat Donovan with the role. This film was the third picture in Monogram's "Jiggs and Maggie" series. For more information on the series, consult the Series Index and see the entry above for Bringing Up Father.