A Doll's House


1917

Brief Synopsis

Nora Helmer has years earlier committed a forgery in order to save the life of her authoritarian husband Torvald. Now she is being blackmailed lives in fear of her husband's finding out and of the shame such a revelation would bring to his career. But when the truth comes out, Nora is shocked to learn where she really stands in her husband's esteem.

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 11, 1917
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Bluebird Photoplays, Inc.
Distribution Company
Bluebird Photoplays, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Et dukkehjem by Henrik Ibsen (Copenhagen, 21 Dec 1879).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
5 reels

Synopsis

Nora Helmer has been living with her smug husband Torvald in blissful ignorance of everything that an adult should know. When her husband falls ill, she forges a check to send him for a cure in Italy, believing with perfect naïveté that it is the correct thing to do and that he will support her in case of trouble. After Nora's crime is exposed, she gets the full impact of Torvald's fury at her ignorance for which he has been responsible. Nora then slams the door of her doll's house and wanders out into the night in search of surroundings where she can be treated as a human being.

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 11, 1917
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Bluebird Photoplays, Inc.
Distribution Company
Bluebird Photoplays, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Et dukkehjem by Henrik Ibsen (Copenhagen, 21 Dec 1879).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
5 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The synopsis included in the copyright description credits Evelyn Selbie with the role of "Mrs. Linden" while all other sources credit Miriam Shelby. Wid's gives scenario credit to Ida May Park, the wife of director Joseph De Grasse, whom all other sources credit for the adaptation. For information on re-makes, see note on 1918 version.