Transformers - The Movie


1h 26m 1986

Brief Synopsis

The heroic Autobots and the evil Decepticons are two factions of transforming robots who are fighting a war on the planet Cybertron. Further complicating matters is the giant planet Unicron, which can consume anything in its path. Unicron must be stopped and the Autobots possess the only thing that

Film Details

Also Known As
Transformers, The, the Movie, Transformers: Le film
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
DE LAURENTIIS COMPANY
Location
Van Nuys, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m

Synopsis

The heroic Autobots and the evil Decepticons are two factions of transforming robots who are fighting a war on the planet Cybertron. Further complicating matters is the giant planet Unicron, which can consume anything in its path. Unicron must be stopped and the Autobots possess the only thing that is capable of doing that, the Matrix of Leadership, so Unicron commands the Deceptors to capture it.

Crew

Maddy Aaronson

Other

Hitoshi Abe

Other

Pat Agnasin

Visual Effects

Pat Agnasin

Other

Ryuji Ajiri

Animator

Douglas Aldrich

Song

Emi Araki

Interpreter

Yoshiharu Azuma

Animator

Jay Bacal

Producer

Joe Bacal

Producer

Mark Bakshi

Production

Masaru Banzai

Animation Photography

Dell Barras

Other

Dell Barras

Visual Effects

Dell Barras

Storyboard Artist

Walt Barric

Technical Advisor

Ken Berger

Adr

Randy Bishop

Song

Jim Blodgett

Sound Editor

Doug Booth

Creative Consultant

Michael Brochstein

Technical Advisor

Chris Brown

Technical Advisor

Kris Brown

Other

Steven C Brown

Executive Editor

Scott Brownlee

Sound

Anne Bryant

Song

Deena Burkett

Main Title Design

Wally Burr

Other

Stan Bush

Song Performer

Stan Bush

Song

Charles Calello

Technical Advisor

Dario Campanile

Art Director

Fred Carillo

Visual Effects

Fred Carillo

Other

Al Carosi

Technical Advisor

Ted Chapman

Sound Editor

George Christon

Song

Peter Chung

Storyboard Artist

Soo Young Chung

Storyboard Artist

Alison Cobb

Sound Editor

Peter Collier

Music Editor

James Cook

Sound

John Costello

Technical Advisor

Karen Coulac

Sound Editor

Brian Courcier

Sound Effects Editor

Phyllis Craig

Color

Virginia Creamer

Other

Eufronio R Cruz

Other

Eufronio R Cruz

Visual Effects

Hiroaki Daiji

Animator

Bob Darcy

Technical Advisor

Paul Davids

Production

Paul Denault

Technical Advisor

Mike Depatie

Sound Editor

Floro Dery

Other

John Detra

Sound Editor

Vince Dicola

Music Producer

Vince Dicola

Music Arranger

Vince Dicola

Song

Vince Dicola

Music

Flint Dille

Story By

Liane Douglas

Other

Robin Draper

Other

Carol L Dudley

Casting

George Dunsay

Technical Advisor

Eric Early

Technical Advisor

Kazuo Ebisawa

Background Painter

Jim Engle

Technical Advisor

Masaharu Etoh

Associate Producer

Ron Fedele

Sound Editor

Chuck Fisher

Technical Advisor

Jimmy Scungelli Fitzpatrick

Consultant

Bill Ford

Technical Advisor

Romeo Francisco

Visual Effects

Romeo Francisco

Other

Jacquie Freeman

Sound

John Patrick Freeman

Animation Director

Ron Friedman

Screenplay

Carl Fritz

Technical Advisor

Ed Fruge

Music Arranger

Ed Fruge

Music Producer

Ed Fruge

Music Editor

Shigemitsu Fujitaka

Animator

Koichi Fukuda

Animator

Masatoshi Fukui

Animation Photography

Tomoko Fukui

Animator

Tomoh Fukumoto

Associate Producer

Lenny Geschke

Sound Editor

Myrna Gibbs

Other

Brian Gillstron

Song

Larry Gillstron

Song

James Gomez

Storyboard Artist

Sid Good

Technical Advisor

Elise Goyette

Production Coordinator

Britt Greko

Other

Tom Griffin

Producer

Terri Gruskin

Production Coordinator

Ernie Guanlao

Visual Effects

Ernie Guanlao

Other

Ernie Guanlao

Storyboard Artist

Lee Gunther

Executive Producer

Norman Hajjar

Technical Advisor

David Hankins

Editor

Robert L Harman

Sound

Craig Harris

Sound

Ray Harvey

Song

Teuo Hattori

Animator

Shigeru Hayash

Animator

Mitsuko Y Hays

Interpreter

Deborah Heineman

Technical Advisor

Art Heller

Technical Advisor

Bob Horne

Technical Advisor

Gabriel Hoyos

Other

Gabriel Hoyos

Visual Effects

Bill Hudson

Other

Reiko Igarashi

Other

Takuya Igarashi

Production Manager

Takehiro Iima

Animator

Yoshinobu Inano

Animator

Mihoko Irie

Other

Mario Ishiyami

Animator

Masao Ito

Animator

Jerry Jacobson

Sound Editor

Nicholas James

Sound Editor

Debbie Jorgensborg

Other

Takahiro Kagami

Animator

Heide Kahme

Technical Advisor

Yoshinori Kanamori

Animator

Yukio Katayama

Animation Photography

Masayuki Kawachi

Special Effects

Sandy Kennedy

Other

Pat Kiley

Technical Advisor

Jooin Kim

Storyboard Artist

Ford Kinder

Song

Kazuo Kinugasa

Color

David Koelher

Sound

Kazuya Komai

Animator

Hiroshi Kosakai

Animator

Yoshitaka Koyama

Animator

Paul Kurnit

Technical Advisor

Baik Seung Kyun

Animator

Victor Langen

Song

Dave Leblanc

Technical Advisor

Doug Lefler

Storyboard Artist

Mat Lizak

Technical Advisor

Margaret Loesch

Executive Producer

Lenny Malcuso

Song

Richard Marcej

Technical Advisor

Kevin Massey

Technical Advisor

Shigeo Matoba

Animator

Bob Matz

Animation Director

Bob Mayer

Music Editor

Norman Mccabe (norm)

Animation Director

Koh Meguro

Production Manager

Hildy Mesnik

Production Coordinator

Yoshito Miki

Animator

Bill Millar

Main Title Design

Bob Mitchell

Technical Advisor

Yoichi Mitsui

Animator

Melissa Mitten

Technical Advisor

Gerald L Moeller

Animator

Gerald L Moeller

Production Manager

Toshio Mori

Animator

Tomoe Morimoto

Animator

Kozo Morishita

Animation Director

Hiroshi Morita

Color

Shigeru Murakami

Animator

Shigenobu Nagasaki

Animator

Satoru N Nakamura

Production Manager

Takako Nakamura

Animator

Kazunori Nakazawa

Animator

Margaret Nichols

Animation Director

Masatoyo Ogura

Animator

Chung Hwan Oh

Storyboard Artist

Kei Okazaki

Animator

Lew Ott

Other

Lew Ott

Visual Effects

Susan Marie Panettieri

Technical Advisor

Tony Papa

Music

Sioak Park

Storyboard Artist

Gene Pelc

Production Coordinator

Andy Perlmutter

Technical Advisor

Ernest Petrangelo

Song

Susanne Pollak

Technical Advisor

Hannah Powell

Other

Spencer Proffer

Song

Bob Prupis

Technical Advisor

Robert Randles

Music Editor

Steven Raskin

Technical Advisor

Jack Ratier

Technical Advisor

Peter Reale

Sound

Steve Reiss

Technical Advisor

Jeff Reynolds

Technical Advisor

Mike Riley

Technical Advisor

Rico Rival

Storyboard Artist

Rico Rival

Other

Rico Rival

Visual Effects

Brent Robertson

Technical Advisor

Steve Rodyn

Technical Advisor

Harriette Rossall

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Transformers, The, the Movie, Transformers: Le film
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
DE LAURENTIIS COMPANY
Location
Van Nuys, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m

Articles

Robert Stack, 1919-2003


Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84.

Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling.

Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger.

Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen.

His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942).

After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958).

Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name.

Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980).

Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles.

by Michael T. Toole
Robert Stack, 1919-2003

Robert Stack, 1919-2003

Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84. Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling. Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger. Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen. His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942). After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958). Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name. Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980). Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 8, 1986

Released in United States Summer August 8, 1986