For Better, for Worse


1919

Brief Synopsis

Dr. Edward Meade and friend Richard Burton both love Sylvia Norcross. Both enlist in the military, but Meade stays back to care for deformed children. Sylvia thinks him a coward and marries Burton. After Burton is presumed dead, Meade and Sylvia are to wed, but Burton returns maimed and scarred.

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 27, 1919
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Distribution Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.; Artcraft Pictures
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

Dr. Edward Meade, a specialist in children's diseases, and Richard Burton, an architect, both enlist in the army in World War I. Meade realizes that he is more greatly needed in the hospital ward than on the battlefield, and he stays home to serve the children. Sylvia Norcross believes him to be a coward and marries Burton instead, on the eve of Burton's leaving for service. Burton is loved by Betty Hoyt, but it is an unrequited love. Later, after Sylvia has an automobile accident in which she injures a small girl and Meade successfully treats her, she realizes that courage, not cowardice, kept Meade at home. News comes of Burton's death, but just as Meade and Sylvia are about to be married, Burton reappears. He has actually survived but is badly disfigured. Burton leaves them free to marry, and recognizes the true love of Betty.

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 27, 1919
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Distribution Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.; Artcraft Pictures
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Edgar Selwyn originally wrote For Better, for Worse as a play, then sold the story to Cecil B. DeMille, but contrary to some contemporary sources never had it produced on the theatrical stage. One pre-production news item, some ads and several modern sources, including Cecil B. DeMille's autobiography, credit William C. de Mille with "adapting" Selwyn's play before Macpherson wrote the actual scenario. All other contemporary sources give sole scenario credit to Macpherson. A few contemporary sources list Macpherson as a co-story writer. According to modern sources, James Wong Howe was the assistant cameraman on this film, Wilfred Buckland was the art director and Howard Higgin was the production manager. Modern sources also identify Mae Giraci in the part of the little girl.