The Girl Who Came Back


1918

Film Details

Release Date
Sep 8, 1918
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Distribution Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.; Paramount Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Leah Kleschna by C. M. S. (Charles Morton Stewart) McLellan (New York, 12 Dec 1904).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Film Length
5 reels reels

Synopsis

Lois Hartner, the daughter of crook Michael Hartner, is well trained in the art of burglary and takes pride in it until she is saved from drowning by an unidentified man. Although her deep admiration for the man has awakened in her a sincere desire to reform, she reluctantly agrees to help her father steal a set of pearls that State Senator George Bayard plans to give to his fiancée, Dorothy Burton. George catches Lois at his safe, and, recognizing him as the man who saved her life, she confesses her mission. During their conversation, Ralph Burton, the governor's wayward son, enters the house and steals the jewels, and although Lois is accused of the theft, George believes her innocent. Because of George's involvement with Lois, Dorothy breaks off their engagement. George finally extricates a confession from Ralph and goes in search of Lois, who has disappeared. He finds her leading a reformed life on a friend's farm and takes her to his heart.

Film Details

Release Date
Sep 8, 1918
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Distribution Company
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.; Paramount Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Leah Kleschna by C. M. S. (Charles Morton Stewart) McLellan (New York, 12 Dec 1904).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Film Length
5 reels reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The picture was also reviewed as The Woman Who Came Back. Famous Players Film Co. released another version of the story, entitled Leah Kleschna, in 1913. Famous Players-Lasky produced yet another version of McLellan's play, The Moral Sinner, in 1924, with Dorothy Dalton starring and Ralph Ince directing. (See AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.3694.)