Vive le Tour!


1962
Vive le Tour!

Brief Synopsis

Documentary about the Tour de France bicycle race.

Film Details

Genre
Documentary
Sports
Foreign
Release Date
1962

Synopsis

Documentary about the Tour de France bicycle race.

Film Details

Genre
Documentary
Sports
Foreign
Release Date
1962

Articles

Vive le Tour! (1962) -


Acclaimed French director Louis Malle (1987's Au Revoir Les Enfants) gives viewers a close-up look at one of the world's greatest bicycle races, the Tour de France, in this short documentary. Less concerned with the race's results than the actual experience of racing, Malle uses quick cuts to put viewers into the middle of the race. He also captures rarely seen aspects of the Tour de France, like the drink raids in which cyclers run into bars and cafes along the route to grab as many bottled liquids as they can steal. Other shots reveal the cyclers cooling their feet in local fountains, a rider being treated for a head injury as he continues to race and the "Broom Wagon" that picks up racers who have dropped out. Malle was under 30 when he shot this footage before the time of lightweight digital cameras or Steady Cams. Hw followed the race's 21 stages through the month of June, then cut ruthlessly to assemble this 18-minute short, now considered one of the greatest of all sports documentaries. Cyclist Jean Bobet provides the narration, much of it drawn from the words of the competitors themselves.

By Frank Miller
Vive Le Tour! (1962) -

Vive le Tour! (1962) -

Acclaimed French director Louis Malle (1987's Au Revoir Les Enfants) gives viewers a close-up look at one of the world's greatest bicycle races, the Tour de France, in this short documentary. Less concerned with the race's results than the actual experience of racing, Malle uses quick cuts to put viewers into the middle of the race. He also captures rarely seen aspects of the Tour de France, like the drink raids in which cyclers run into bars and cafes along the route to grab as many bottled liquids as they can steal. Other shots reveal the cyclers cooling their feet in local fountains, a rider being treated for a head injury as he continues to race and the "Broom Wagon" that picks up racers who have dropped out. Malle was under 30 when he shot this footage before the time of lightweight digital cameras or Steady Cams. Hw followed the race's 21 stages through the month of June, then cut ruthlessly to assemble this 18-minute short, now considered one of the greatest of all sports documentaries. Cyclist Jean Bobet provides the narration, much of it drawn from the words of the competitors themselves. By Frank Miller

Quotes

Trivia