Bonnie, Bonnie Lassie


1919

Film Details

Also Known As
Auld Jeremiah
Release Date
Oct 5, 1919
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Film Mfg. Co.
Distribution Company
Universal Film Mfg. Co.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Auld Jeremiah" by Henry C. Rowland in Ainslee's Magazine (publication date undetermined).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
6 reels

Synopsis

Alisa Graeme journeys from Scotland to America to visit Jeremiah Wishart, an old wealthy friend of her grandfather. The invalid Jeremiah is charmed by Alisa and decides she would make a good wife for his favorite nephew David. Without meeting Alisa, David refuses the arrangement and runs away. Later, Alisa also runs away rather than wed another of Jeremiah's nephews and meets a young billboard painter in the country. The two form a partnership, travel the countryside together painting billboards and gradually fall in love. When the painter tells Alisa that he won't marry until his finances are secure, she leaves him in anger and heads for Jeremiah's house. From his wheelchair, Jeremiah sees first his wayward nephew painting a nearby billboard, then a young woman stopping to help him. Jeremiah's initial fury at David softens when he recognizes the woman as Alisa. Once Alisa and David realize the other's identity, they blissfully reunite.

Film Details

Also Known As
Auld Jeremiah
Release Date
Oct 5, 1919
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Film Mfg. Co.
Distribution Company
Universal Film Mfg. Co.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Auld Jeremiah" by Henry C. Rowland in Ainslee's Magazine (publication date undetermined).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
6 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

This film's working title was Auld Jeremiah. Trade articles during the first weeks of production credited Waldemar Young with the scenario, but later trade notices credit Violet Clark, and the copyright register credits Clark and Browning.