Which Woman?


1918

Film Details

Also Known As
Nobody's Bride, Woman Against Woman
Release Date
Jun 10, 1918
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Bluebird Photoplays, Inc.
Distribution Company
Bluebird Photoplays, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novelette "Nobody's Bride" by Evelyn Campbell in All-Story Weekly (publication date undetermined).

Synopsis

Doris Standish's father insists upon her marriage to aging millionaire Cyrus W. Hopkins, but just before the wedding, the young woman runs from the house and leaps into a parked car, ordering the chauffeur to drive her quickly away. The driver is Jimmy Nevin, who, because Hopkins financially ruined his father, has agreed to help a gang of crooks in their plot to steal the bride's jewels and wedding presents. Realizing that Doris is not Mary Butler, his accomplice, Jimmy offers to accompany her home, but when she refuses to return, he takes her to the thieves' hideout. Mary and her henchmen try to rob Doris, but she escapes and notifies the police. Doris, her father and Hopkins return to the hideout just before the police arrive to arrest all of the thieves but Jimmy, who has grown extremely fond of the runaway bride.

Film Details

Also Known As
Nobody's Bride, Woman Against Woman
Release Date
Jun 10, 1918
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Bluebird Photoplays, Inc.
Distribution Company
Bluebird Photoplays, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novelette "Nobody's Bride" by Evelyn Campbell in All-Story Weekly (publication date undetermined).

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film's pre-release titles were Woman Against Woman and Nobody's Bride. Browning assumed the role of director when Harry Pollard became too ill to complete the filming. The film was remade by Universal in 1923 as Nobody's Bride, with Herbert Blaché directing (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.3867). According to Universal studio records, which contain information on both the 1918 and the 1923 films, Alice Catlin prepared a treatment of the story, and Albert Kenyon wrote a continuity. Kenyon's script was used for the 1923 film; it is unclear from contemporary sources if Catlin's treatment was used for either film. A modern source credits Catlin with the treatment for the 1918 film.