Jim Bludso


1917

Film Details

Release Date
Feb 4, 1917
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Fine Arts Film Co.
Distribution Company
Triangle Distributing Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the poems "Jim Bludso of the Prairie Belle" and "Little Breeches" by John Hay in Pike County Ballads (Boston, 1871) and the play Jim Bludso by I. N. Morris (New York, 5 Jan 1903).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Film Length
5 reels

Synopsis

At the end of the Civil War, engineer Jim Bludso, accompanied by his friend, Banty Tim, returns home to the town of Gilgal, and discovers that his wife Gabrielle has deserted him and their son Breeches for another man. Jim is welcomed by Kate Taggart, the village storekeeper's daughter, and their attachment deepens until Gabrielle returns after being deserted by her paramour, and Jim forgives her for their son's sake. Meanwhile, Ben Merrill, an unscrupulous contractor who has built the town levee, fears that the structure will not hold the coming flood waters. Merrill destroys the levee and attempts to place the blame on Jim and Banty Tim. In the flood, Gabrielle is killed, but before dying, she exposes Merrill as the man for whom she had deserted her home. This information reaches Jim when he and Merrill are aboard the boat The Prairie Bell . In the ensuing fight, the ship catches fire and explodes. Rescued from the debris by Banty Tim, Jim marries Kate and begins a new life.

Film Details

Release Date
Feb 4, 1917
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Fine Arts Film Co.
Distribution Company
Triangle Distributing Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the poems "Jim Bludso of the Prairie Belle" and "Little Breeches" by John Hay in Pike County Ballads (Boston, 1871) and the play Jim Bludso by I. N. Morris (New York, 5 Jan 1903).

Technical Specs

Sound
Silent
Color
Black and White
Film Length
5 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

John Hay was the Secretary of State under William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt. Some contemporary sources credit Browning as the sole director, while others give Browning and Lucas joint credit; one credits Browning as director and Lucas as co-director. Scenes from the film were shot in San Francisco, Rio Vista and Nigger Clough, CA.