L'Age d'Or


60m 1930

Brief Synopsis

Bunuel's first feature has more of a plot than Un Chien Andalou, but it's still a pure Surrealist film, so this is only a vague outline. A man and a woman are passionately in love with one another, but their attempts to consummate that passion are constantly thwarted, by their families, the Church and bourgeois society.

Film Details

Also Known As
Age d'Or, Golden Age, The
Release Date
1930

Technical Specs

Duration
60m
Sound
Mono (Tobis-Klangfilm)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

A sequence of moral and surrealist aesthetics.

Film Details

Also Known As
Age d'Or, Golden Age, The
Release Date
1930

Technical Specs

Duration
60m
Sound
Mono (Tobis-Klangfilm)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

Two by Luis Bunuel & Salvador Dali - L'Age d'Or and Un Chien Andalou


L'AGE D'OR (1930) and UN CHIEN ANDALOU (1929), Luis Bunuel and Salvador Dali landmarks of surrealist cinema, will have a one-week engagement at Film Forum from Friday, January 30 through Thursday, February 5. Both films are shown together, with L'AGE D'OR presented in a new 35mm print; showtimes are daily at 2:00, 3:40, 5:20, 7:00*, 8:40* (Note: There are no 7:00 and 8:40 shows on Tuesday, February 3).

The catalog of startling images and sequences in L'AGE D'OR include a man's face covered with flies; a blind man being kicked; a pseudo-documentary on scorpions; clerically-garbed skeletons on rocky cliffs; a pompous foundation-laying ceremony interrupted by a man and a woman noisily coupling in mud - then later, in evening clothes, trying to tryst while sitting on clumsy cane chairs and being interrupted by a phone call from the Minister of the Interior; guests at a fancy reception ignoring a farm cart rolling through; a cuckolded lover throwing a live archbishop out the window; a survivor of the "most brutal of orgies" emerging dressed as Christ. Bunuel & Dali's follow-up to Un Chien Andalou (original title: La Bete Andalouse) was financed by Gallic moneybags the Vicomte de Noailles as his annual cinematic birthday gift to his wife (a previous cadeau was Cocteau's Blood of a Poet); contemporary rightwingers threw stink bombs and purple ink at the screen, the cops banned it, and Noailles was kicked out of the Jockey Club (a good sport, he still pronounced it "exquisite and delicious"). If brutal assaults on religious, political, and social establishments no longer constitute the novelty they posed in 1930, Bunuel's first sound film remains perhaps the screen's greatest ode to Surrealism, and a veritable checklist of the obsessions that would mark the rest of his long career.

Bunuel & Dali's first collaboration, UN CHIEN ANDALOU slaps the audience in its opening moments with a shocking close-up - then piles on images that would still make both David Lynch and David Cronenberg jealous: hands swarming with ants (Bunuel studied entomology at school), breasts transforming into buttocks, mysteriously-disappearing underarm hair, a donkey corpse on top of a grand piano, with a bound priest in tow, etc. etc. Explained Dali, "the theme is 'the pure and correct line of 'conduct' of a human who pursues love through wretched humanitarian patriotic ideals and the other miserable workings of reality." Uh-huh.
Two By Luis Bunuel & Salvador Dali - L'age D'or And Un Chien Andalou

Two by Luis Bunuel & Salvador Dali - L'Age d'Or and Un Chien Andalou

L'AGE D'OR (1930) and UN CHIEN ANDALOU (1929), Luis Bunuel and Salvador Dali landmarks of surrealist cinema, will have a one-week engagement at Film Forum from Friday, January 30 through Thursday, February 5. Both films are shown together, with L'AGE D'OR presented in a new 35mm print; showtimes are daily at 2:00, 3:40, 5:20, 7:00*, 8:40* (Note: There are no 7:00 and 8:40 shows on Tuesday, February 3). The catalog of startling images and sequences in L'AGE D'OR include a man's face covered with flies; a blind man being kicked; a pseudo-documentary on scorpions; clerically-garbed skeletons on rocky cliffs; a pompous foundation-laying ceremony interrupted by a man and a woman noisily coupling in mud - then later, in evening clothes, trying to tryst while sitting on clumsy cane chairs and being interrupted by a phone call from the Minister of the Interior; guests at a fancy reception ignoring a farm cart rolling through; a cuckolded lover throwing a live archbishop out the window; a survivor of the "most brutal of orgies" emerging dressed as Christ. Bunuel & Dali's follow-up to Un Chien Andalou (original title: La Bete Andalouse) was financed by Gallic moneybags the Vicomte de Noailles as his annual cinematic birthday gift to his wife (a previous cadeau was Cocteau's Blood of a Poet); contemporary rightwingers threw stink bombs and purple ink at the screen, the cops banned it, and Noailles was kicked out of the Jockey Club (a good sport, he still pronounced it "exquisite and delicious"). If brutal assaults on religious, political, and social establishments no longer constitute the novelty they posed in 1930, Bunuel's first sound film remains perhaps the screen's greatest ode to Surrealism, and a veritable checklist of the obsessions that would mark the rest of his long career. Bunuel & Dali's first collaboration, UN CHIEN ANDALOU slaps the audience in its opening moments with a shocking close-up - then piles on images that would still make both David Lynch and David Cronenberg jealous: hands swarming with ants (Bunuel studied entomology at school), breasts transforming into buttocks, mysteriously-disappearing underarm hair, a donkey corpse on top of a grand piano, with a bound priest in tow, etc. etc. Explained Dali, "the theme is 'the pure and correct line of 'conduct' of a human who pursues love through wretched humanitarian patriotic ideals and the other miserable workings of reality." Uh-huh.

Quotes

Trivia

For various legal reasons, this film was withdrawn from circulation in 1934 by the Vicomte (Charles, 1891-1981) and Vicomtesse (Marie-Laure, 1902-1970) de Noailles, who had financed the film. The US premiere was on 1 November 1979 at the Roxie Cinema in San Francisco.

This film was granted a screening permit after being presented to the Board of Censors as the dream of a madman. Opening at Studio 28 in Paris in October 1930, word spread about the film's bizarre content. On the evening of 3 December 1930, the fascist League of Patriots and other groups began (halfway through the film) to throw purple ink at the screen, then rushed out into the lobby of the theater, slashing paintings by Tanguy, Dali, Miro, and Man Ray. The producers of the film, Charles and Marie-Laure de Noailles, soon withdrew the film from circulation. The (legal) US premiere of subtitled prints of this film took place 1-15 November 1979 at the Roxie Cinema, San Francisco.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States October 12, 1974

Released in United States September 21, 1964

Shown at New York Film Festival (Homage to Bunuel) October 12, 1974.

Shown at New York Film Festival (Retrospective) September 21, 1964.

Released in United States September 21, 1964 (Shown at New York Film Festival (Retrospective) September 21, 1964.)

Released in United States October 12, 1974 (Shown at New York Film Festival (Homage to Bunuel) October 12, 1974.)