Madam Kitty


1h 50m 1975

Brief Synopsis

Kitty runs a brothel in Nazi Germany where the soldiers come to "relax". Recording devices have been installed in each room by a power hungry army official who plans to use the information to blackmail Hitler and gain power himself. A girl named Margherita discovers the little ploy and with Kitty's help plans to take on the dangerous task of exposing the conspiracy.

Film Details

Also Known As
Salon Kitty
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1975

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 50m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)

Synopsis

Kitty runs a brothel in Nazi Germany where the soldiers come to "relax". Recording devices have been installed in each room by a power hungry army official who plans to use the information to blackmail Hitler and gain power himself. A girl named Margherita discovers the little ploy and with Kitty's help plans to take on the dangerous task of exposing the conspiracy.

Film Details

Also Known As
Salon Kitty
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1975

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 50m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)

Articles

Salon Kitty


Before Italian director Tinto Brass (1933-present) gained notoriety for helming Caligula (1979), a film some trumpeted as "the ultimate porno," he submerged himself into a different kind of decadence with Salon Kitty (1976). On the surface, both films have obvious similarities insofar as they both seem to wallow in the decadence of corrupt empires while parading various sexual depravities along memorable set designs. Also, both films were to be compromised by the producers, albeit for different reasons. With Caligula the producers at Penthous wanted, and inserted, salacious sex scenes with the kind of women that could be found within their magazine (as opposed to the more voluptuous ones favored by Brass). More traditional meddling occurred with Salon Kitty when the producers edited the film in an effort to appease censors. Brass insists that his main intent, with both films, was to provide a unique look at how absolute power corrupts absolutely. With Caligula so heavily meddled, it's harder to assess how much of that film adheres to Brass's original vision. But with Salon Kitty praise (or demerit) is easier to assert - especially with Blue Underground's latest unrated and uncut dvd release.

The story for Salon Kitty hinges on the eponymous brothel, which is well known among the Nazi party and is run by Madame Kitty Kellermann (Ingrid Thulin). Helmut Wallenberg (Helmut Berger), an SS officer, gets the idea of transforming the whole thing into an altogether different brothel, one that recruits middle class German women who are such avid Nazi sympathizers they will do anything for their country - including satisfying their clients most wicked perversions and reporting on them to their commanders. Wallenberg also hides microphones in the rooms so that he can eavesdrop in on the conversations, thus being privy to all kinds of discretionary information. When Wallenberg's mistress of choice, Margherita (Teresa Ann Savoy), falls in love with a disgruntled Nazi war hero who confesses to her his plans to defect, Wallenberg intervenes - and sets in motion the beginning of his own demise.

Brass is heralded by some as an Italian Russ Meyer, or Ken Russell, due in part to his outrageous sensibilities. Others praise him obliquely as the Fellini of sexploitation. But neither of these tags would really prepare audiences for any of the various opening scenes in Salon Kitty, such as one that features ribald dancing and singing in a chop house (with footage of real pigs being slaughtered). What leaves little to dispute, however, is that the Production Design by Ken Adam is sensational throughout the film - and it all starts out with a womb-like warmth that then moves to a colder and impersonal flavor as the Nazi's take hold of the Salon. Adam, who had been traumatized by working with Stanley Kubrick on Barry Lyndon (1975), was given complete artistic freedom by Brass and thus credits his experience on Salon Kitty with revitalizing his self-confidence. Indeed, the set designs are fantastic and completely uninhibited. Blue Underground's double-disk set features the film in it's Anamorphic 1.85:1 aspect ratio and is packed with bonus material including an interview with Tinto Brass, radio spots, an interview with Ken Adam, Jost Jacob's costume designs, theatrical trailers, a Tinto Brass biography, and a dvd-rom feature titled "The Story of Salon Kitty."

For more information about Salon Kitty, visit Blue Underground. To order Salon Kitty, go to TCM Shopping.

by Pablo Kjolseth
Salon Kitty

Salon Kitty

Before Italian director Tinto Brass (1933-present) gained notoriety for helming Caligula (1979), a film some trumpeted as "the ultimate porno," he submerged himself into a different kind of decadence with Salon Kitty (1976). On the surface, both films have obvious similarities insofar as they both seem to wallow in the decadence of corrupt empires while parading various sexual depravities along memorable set designs. Also, both films were to be compromised by the producers, albeit for different reasons. With Caligula the producers at Penthous wanted, and inserted, salacious sex scenes with the kind of women that could be found within their magazine (as opposed to the more voluptuous ones favored by Brass). More traditional meddling occurred with Salon Kitty when the producers edited the film in an effort to appease censors. Brass insists that his main intent, with both films, was to provide a unique look at how absolute power corrupts absolutely. With Caligula so heavily meddled, it's harder to assess how much of that film adheres to Brass's original vision. But with Salon Kitty praise (or demerit) is easier to assert - especially with Blue Underground's latest unrated and uncut dvd release. The story for Salon Kitty hinges on the eponymous brothel, which is well known among the Nazi party and is run by Madame Kitty Kellermann (Ingrid Thulin). Helmut Wallenberg (Helmut Berger), an SS officer, gets the idea of transforming the whole thing into an altogether different brothel, one that recruits middle class German women who are such avid Nazi sympathizers they will do anything for their country - including satisfying their clients most wicked perversions and reporting on them to their commanders. Wallenberg also hides microphones in the rooms so that he can eavesdrop in on the conversations, thus being privy to all kinds of discretionary information. When Wallenberg's mistress of choice, Margherita (Teresa Ann Savoy), falls in love with a disgruntled Nazi war hero who confesses to her his plans to defect, Wallenberg intervenes - and sets in motion the beginning of his own demise. Brass is heralded by some as an Italian Russ Meyer, or Ken Russell, due in part to his outrageous sensibilities. Others praise him obliquely as the Fellini of sexploitation. But neither of these tags would really prepare audiences for any of the various opening scenes in Salon Kitty, such as one that features ribald dancing and singing in a chop house (with footage of real pigs being slaughtered). What leaves little to dispute, however, is that the Production Design by Ken Adam is sensational throughout the film - and it all starts out with a womb-like warmth that then moves to a colder and impersonal flavor as the Nazi's take hold of the Salon. Adam, who had been traumatized by working with Stanley Kubrick on Barry Lyndon (1975), was given complete artistic freedom by Brass and thus credits his experience on Salon Kitty with revitalizing his self-confidence. Indeed, the set designs are fantastic and completely uninhibited. Blue Underground's double-disk set features the film in it's Anamorphic 1.85:1 aspect ratio and is packed with bonus material including an interview with Tinto Brass, radio spots, an interview with Ken Adam, Jost Jacob's costume designs, theatrical trailers, a Tinto Brass biography, and a dvd-rom feature titled "The Story of Salon Kitty." For more information about Salon Kitty, visit Blue Underground. To order Salon Kitty, go to TCM Shopping. by Pablo Kjolseth

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1975

Released in United States 1975