Have Rocket--Will Travel


1h 16m 1959
Have Rocket--Will Travel

Brief Synopsis

Three janitors stumble onto the formula for rocket fuel.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Sci-Fi
Release Date
Aug 1959
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Harry Romm Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 16m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Synopsis

In their cabin on the grounds of the National Space Foundation, maintenance men Moe, Larry and Curley Joe are rudely awakened from a deep sleep when a just-launched rocket plunges back to Earth and crashes into a nearby cliff. The threesome scramble to find the source of the commotion, and are soon joined by foundation head J.P. Morse, scientist Dr. Ingrid Naarveg and psychologist Dr. Ted Benson, members of the rocket development team. After examining the rocket, the scientists return to the lab, leaving Moe, Larry and Curley Joe to guard the craft. Hearing the cries of a monkey trapped inside the rocket, the three open the hatch and climb in. Their movements cause the craft to tip over, trapping them inside. As they ponder how to get out, the monkey points to a red button, which, when pushed, opens the hatch, freeing them. Later, at the lab, Ingrid brews the trio a pot of coffee on a Bunsen burner and tells them that they remind her of her dear, janitor father. Soon after, J.P. comes to inform Ingrid that the board of directors has decided to close down her laboratory because she has failed to develop a workable rocket fuel. When Ingrid starts crying, the trio's fatherly instincts take over and they decide to concoct their own formula for the fuel. After Larry, mistaking a cup of the formula for coffee, pours sugar into it and drinks it, he begins to breathe fire. Realizing that they have developed a viable formula, the trio hooks up a fire hose to the tank containing the formula and begin to pump fuel into the rocket. Meanwhile, Ted tries to comfort Ingrid with romance. In the excitement of their discovery, the Stooges drop the key to the rocket down the lab's sink drain, and when Curley Joe tries to retrieve it, he breaks a pipe, flooding the basement. J.P., irritated by the sound of the pumps, comes to the lab to complain, and when he opens the door, he tumbles into the basement, joining the drowning trio. The pressure of the water finally bursts open the door, sending them all spilling into the street. Pursued by J. P., Moe, Larry and Curley Joe take refuge in the rocket. J.P. follows the hose, and finding a puddle of fuel, lights a match to examine it, igniting the rocket and sending it blasting into space. The rocket has been set on an automatic course to Venus, and when it lands, the trio climb out and are attacked by a giant, fire-breathing spider. After jumping off a cliff to safety, they find a talking unicorn whose horn is stuck in some rocks. Once they free the unicorn, the grateful animal agrees to lead them to the city "housing the highest form of life on the planet." The unicorn leaves them at the outskirts of a city, where a flying, talking car greets them and takes them to a city composed of pure electrical energy. They are transported to a fortress-like room where a giant, box-like robot with multiple arms announces that he is the master of the world. After shrinking the trio, the robot imprisons them in a bird cage and declares that he is lonely and has decided to use them as models to create some robot companions. After building the replicas, the robot restores the trio to their normal size and awards them as playthings to the replicants. When Moe, Larry and Curley Joe flee, the replicant robots chase them in and out of doors along the corridor. Deciding to turn the trio into pure electrical energy, the replicants push a button, which instead of disintegrating them, sends them catapulting back to the rocket. Joined by the unicorn, they blast off and return to earth where they are hailed as heroes. At a ball given in the Stooges' honor, Ted and Ingrid announce that they are married and promise to name their children Moe, Larry and Curley Joe. While Moe dances with a statuesque blonde, Curley Joe dances with a dowager. After the couples collide several times on the dance floor, they begin to argue, and when Larry accidentally falls onto the blonde, she slaps him, causing the dowager to attack the blonde. A brawl then erupts on the dance floor, sending the trio onto the balcony to seek refuge. Suddenly, the replicant robots appear in a cloud of smoke and enter the fracas inside while Moe, Larry and Curley Joe take off in the flying car for the sanctity of space.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Sci-Fi
Release Date
Aug 1959
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Harry Romm Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 16m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White

Articles

Have Rocket, Will Travel


The end of 1957 was also the end of an era at Columbia Pictures – the nearly quarter-of-a-century-long relationship between the studio and The Three Stooges came to an abrupt and unceremonious end. Moe Howard, Larry Fine, and Moe's brother Jerome aka Curly – had been mainstays in Columbia's short subject unit (after Curly's death, his brother Shemp took his place, and after Shemp's death the role when to comedian Joe Besser). But the times were changing. Following the lead of all the other studios which had phased out their shorts divisions years before, Columbia finally decided to shut down their unit. The Stooges were out of a job; the hard-working comedians were no longer box-office draws and movie theaters just didn't exhibit shorts anymore. If the Three Stooges were to continue working, it looked like nightclubs and other personal appearances would be all they could expect in the way of bookings if they still had paying fans.

Show business works in mysterious ways, though. Television, by now the dominant entertainment medium, needed product to fill airtime, and studios began to comb through their vast libraries to find movies and other material that they could sell to stations all over the United States. Vintage cartoons like Popeye, which were originally targeted to adult movie audiences but which worked beautifully as juvenile fare, were already immensely popular kiddie programming, playing in afternoon and early evening time periods to multitudes of youngsters who rushed home from school to catch their favorites. Columbia got the bright idea to test the waters with a batch of their old Three Stooges shorts, releasing them at the beginning of 1958. The slapstick trio soon found slots on channels across the country.

And a funny thing happened to the Stooges on the way to oblivion. Their comedy shorts became the top-rated programs on many stations, and Stooge-mania was revived again. With new Stooge Joe DeRita now in their live act, Larry, Moe and Joe were about to experience a phoenix-like resurgence in popularly. DeRita, a veteran burlesque comic and Minsky revue regular, shaved his head ala the original Curly, and was given the nickname "Curly-Joe" to distinguish him from both Curly Howard and Joe Besser. Something clicked, and with the help of millions of kids across the country who discovered they loved the Stooges' antics, demand for the trio surged. Personal appearances at county fairs, supermarket openings, movie theaters and anywhere else lucky enough to book them broke attendance records. Their salary grew from $2500 a week in nightclubs to ten times that for just an hour or so at an outdoor event filled with crowds of screaming kids barely held in check by uniformed policemen.

Not missing a trick, Columbia wanted to capitalize on this resurgence. The classic Stooge shorts were free for them to exploit and shockingly lucrative for the studio – not a penny of residuals flowed back to the boys, per a SAG rule which eliminated payments for pre-1960 material. After editing together old shorts to create a makeshift feature for theaters, they realized that the Stooges would be a lucrative deal even if they had to pay them real salaries again. Columbia offered them the chance to make a new motion picture, specifically targeted to the Stooges' new-found juvenile fans. Despite continuous carping from parents' group about the bad influence of Stooge slapstick on children's behavior, Columbia announced that they would produce a full-length space travel comedy starring the Three Stooges called Have Rocket, Will Travel (1959). America was space crazy -- the competition with the Russians for space supremacy was on – and kids all over loved the gadgetry and especially the fact that monkeys were an integral part of the U.S. space program. What kid doesn't love monkeys? Needless to say, a monkey was cast in the new Stooges movie.

Have Rocket, Will Travel began filming in mid-May 1959. A very tight production schedule – nothing Moe and Larry weren't used to – and a budget under $400,000 (of which the Stooges got $30,000 and 25% of any eventual profits) kept the boys busy. Director David Lowell Rich came from television, with credits on top shows like Maverick, Playhouse 90 and 77 Sunset Strip. Writer Raphael Hayes was also a TV veteran, penning episodes of popular anthologies such as Studio One and Suspense. Moe, Larry and Joe DeRita starred, with Norwegian actress Anna-Lisa cast as a beautiful lady scientist, and veteran actor Jerome Cowan as the head of the fictional National Space Foundation. Cowan had appeared in over a hundred movies and as many television roles over his long career, and is best remembered for his role as Miles Archer in The Maltese Falcon (1941), and for his part as the D.A. in the original Miracle on 34th Street (1947). Robert Colbert co-starred as a NSF psychologist and love interest for Anna-Lisa. (Colbert would be part of another science fiction endeavor several years later as star of Irwin Allen's short-lived, now cult television series The Time Tunnel).

It was during the filming of Have Rocket, Will Travel that the Stooges, influenced by Moe (who took on most of the business decisions for the group), decided to part ways with longtime personal manager Harry Romm. Wanting more control and more of the profits from the burgeoning Three Stooges resurgence, Moe replaced Romm with Norman Maurer, Moe's son-in-law who was instrumental in creating Three Stooges comic books and also worked as a producer. Maurer was responsible in great part for the Stooges' continued popularity at that time and for orchestrating their subsequent movie careers primarily in movies for Columbia Studios. (A highly recommended read for all Stooges fans is The Three Stooges Scrapbook, written by Jeff Lenburg, Joan Howard Maurer, and Gregg Lenburg; it's still the best reference book on the Stooges.)

Have Rocket, Will Travel (the title primarily a pop culture reference to then-current TV Western hit Have Gun, Will Travel) was a fanciful mix of science fiction gadgetry, funny costumes, elaborate alien creatures including a giant spider and a unicorn, and robots. Most importantly, many of the comedy routines in the film were classic Stooge bits – like dancing with a spring on the back of their pants and wrestling with a tangle of pipes -- which both old fans and new ones just discovering the trio on TV would recognize and enjoy. Adding to the enjoyment was a lively musical score from veteran Mischa Bakaleinikoff with a title song from Oscar®-winning Columbia Studios musical talent George Duning.

Have Rocket, Will Travel was released in the era before critics and scholars took the artistry of the Three Stooges seriously, and reviews deemed the movie fit only for juvenile audiences. To be fair, that was precisely what Columbia was hoping, and the movie pulled in a quick and tidy profit, leading to more movies for the aging but energetic comic trio. As a humorous take on America's fascination with the Space Race, Have Rocket, Will Travel has moments that really take off. It's a more-than-respectable entry in the Three Stooges' cinematic legacy that needs to offer no apology for the laughter it provides for audiences of all ages.

Producer: Harry A. Romm
Director: David Lowell Rich
Screenplay: Raphael Hayes
Cinematography: Ray Cory
Art Direction: John T. McCormack
Music: Mischa Bakaleinikoff (uncredited)
Film Editing: Danny B. Landres
Cast: Moe Howard (Moe), Larry Fine (Larry), Joe DeRita (Curley-Joe), Jerome Cowan (J.P. Morse), Anna-Lisa (Dr. Ingrid Naarveg), Bob Colbert (Dr. Ted Benson), Don Lamond (The Venusian Robot/Reporter/Narrator, voice).
BW-76m. Letterboxed.

by Lisa Mateas

Have Rocket, Will Travel

Have Rocket, Will Travel

The end of 1957 was also the end of an era at Columbia Pictures – the nearly quarter-of-a-century-long relationship between the studio and The Three Stooges came to an abrupt and unceremonious end. Moe Howard, Larry Fine, and Moe's brother Jerome aka Curly – had been mainstays in Columbia's short subject unit (after Curly's death, his brother Shemp took his place, and after Shemp's death the role when to comedian Joe Besser). But the times were changing. Following the lead of all the other studios which had phased out their shorts divisions years before, Columbia finally decided to shut down their unit. The Stooges were out of a job; the hard-working comedians were no longer box-office draws and movie theaters just didn't exhibit shorts anymore. If the Three Stooges were to continue working, it looked like nightclubs and other personal appearances would be all they could expect in the way of bookings if they still had paying fans. Show business works in mysterious ways, though. Television, by now the dominant entertainment medium, needed product to fill airtime, and studios began to comb through their vast libraries to find movies and other material that they could sell to stations all over the United States. Vintage cartoons like Popeye, which were originally targeted to adult movie audiences but which worked beautifully as juvenile fare, were already immensely popular kiddie programming, playing in afternoon and early evening time periods to multitudes of youngsters who rushed home from school to catch their favorites. Columbia got the bright idea to test the waters with a batch of their old Three Stooges shorts, releasing them at the beginning of 1958. The slapstick trio soon found slots on channels across the country. And a funny thing happened to the Stooges on the way to oblivion. Their comedy shorts became the top-rated programs on many stations, and Stooge-mania was revived again. With new Stooge Joe DeRita now in their live act, Larry, Moe and Joe were about to experience a phoenix-like resurgence in popularly. DeRita, a veteran burlesque comic and Minsky revue regular, shaved his head ala the original Curly, and was given the nickname "Curly-Joe" to distinguish him from both Curly Howard and Joe Besser. Something clicked, and with the help of millions of kids across the country who discovered they loved the Stooges' antics, demand for the trio surged. Personal appearances at county fairs, supermarket openings, movie theaters and anywhere else lucky enough to book them broke attendance records. Their salary grew from $2500 a week in nightclubs to ten times that for just an hour or so at an outdoor event filled with crowds of screaming kids barely held in check by uniformed policemen. Not missing a trick, Columbia wanted to capitalize on this resurgence. The classic Stooge shorts were free for them to exploit and shockingly lucrative for the studio – not a penny of residuals flowed back to the boys, per a SAG rule which eliminated payments for pre-1960 material. After editing together old shorts to create a makeshift feature for theaters, they realized that the Stooges would be a lucrative deal even if they had to pay them real salaries again. Columbia offered them the chance to make a new motion picture, specifically targeted to the Stooges' new-found juvenile fans. Despite continuous carping from parents' group about the bad influence of Stooge slapstick on children's behavior, Columbia announced that they would produce a full-length space travel comedy starring the Three Stooges called Have Rocket, Will Travel (1959). America was space crazy -- the competition with the Russians for space supremacy was on – and kids all over loved the gadgetry and especially the fact that monkeys were an integral part of the U.S. space program. What kid doesn't love monkeys? Needless to say, a monkey was cast in the new Stooges movie. Have Rocket, Will Travel began filming in mid-May 1959. A very tight production schedule – nothing Moe and Larry weren't used to – and a budget under $400,000 (of which the Stooges got $30,000 and 25% of any eventual profits) kept the boys busy. Director David Lowell Rich came from television, with credits on top shows like Maverick, Playhouse 90 and 77 Sunset Strip. Writer Raphael Hayes was also a TV veteran, penning episodes of popular anthologies such as Studio One and Suspense. Moe, Larry and Joe DeRita starred, with Norwegian actress Anna-Lisa cast as a beautiful lady scientist, and veteran actor Jerome Cowan as the head of the fictional National Space Foundation. Cowan had appeared in over a hundred movies and as many television roles over his long career, and is best remembered for his role as Miles Archer in The Maltese Falcon (1941), and for his part as the D.A. in the original Miracle on 34th Street (1947). Robert Colbert co-starred as a NSF psychologist and love interest for Anna-Lisa. (Colbert would be part of another science fiction endeavor several years later as star of Irwin Allen's short-lived, now cult television series The Time Tunnel). It was during the filming of Have Rocket, Will Travel that the Stooges, influenced by Moe (who took on most of the business decisions for the group), decided to part ways with longtime personal manager Harry Romm. Wanting more control and more of the profits from the burgeoning Three Stooges resurgence, Moe replaced Romm with Norman Maurer, Moe's son-in-law who was instrumental in creating Three Stooges comic books and also worked as a producer. Maurer was responsible in great part for the Stooges' continued popularity at that time and for orchestrating their subsequent movie careers primarily in movies for Columbia Studios. (A highly recommended read for all Stooges fans is The Three Stooges Scrapbook, written by Jeff Lenburg, Joan Howard Maurer, and Gregg Lenburg; it's still the best reference book on the Stooges.) Have Rocket, Will Travel (the title primarily a pop culture reference to then-current TV Western hit Have Gun, Will Travel) was a fanciful mix of science fiction gadgetry, funny costumes, elaborate alien creatures including a giant spider and a unicorn, and robots. Most importantly, many of the comedy routines in the film were classic Stooge bits – like dancing with a spring on the back of their pants and wrestling with a tangle of pipes -- which both old fans and new ones just discovering the trio on TV would recognize and enjoy. Adding to the enjoyment was a lively musical score from veteran Mischa Bakaleinikoff with a title song from Oscar®-winning Columbia Studios musical talent George Duning. Have Rocket, Will Travel was released in the era before critics and scholars took the artistry of the Three Stooges seriously, and reviews deemed the movie fit only for juvenile audiences. To be fair, that was precisely what Columbia was hoping, and the movie pulled in a quick and tidy profit, leading to more movies for the aging but energetic comic trio. As a humorous take on America's fascination with the Space Race, Have Rocket, Will Travel has moments that really take off. It's a more-than-respectable entry in the Three Stooges' cinematic legacy that needs to offer no apology for the laughter it provides for audiences of all ages. Producer: Harry A. Romm Director: David Lowell Rich Screenplay: Raphael Hayes Cinematography: Ray Cory Art Direction: John T. McCormack Music: Mischa Bakaleinikoff (uncredited) Film Editing: Danny B. Landres Cast: Moe Howard (Moe), Larry Fine (Larry), Joe DeRita (Curley-Joe), Jerome Cowan (J.P. Morse), Anna-Lisa (Dr. Ingrid Naarveg), Bob Colbert (Dr. Ted Benson), Don Lamond (The Venusian Robot/Reporter/Narrator, voice). BW-76m. Letterboxed. by Lisa Mateas

Quotes

Trivia

The only feature film with Joe DeRita that contains a Stooge eye-poke. The boys later deleted the gag from their routine, as angry mothers began to protest that children were poking their eyes out.

Notes

The opening credits read: "Columbia Pictures Corporation present the Three Stooges in Have Rocket-Will Travel. Moe Howard, Larry Fine and Joe De Rita are credited individually on the film, and are never referred to as "The Stooges" within the story. The picture opens with an offscreen narrator informing the audience, in a mock-serious tone, about the development of space travel. Although several reviews noted that Have Rocket-Will Travel marked the first feature-length film starring the "Three Stooges," the 1951 film Gold Rush actually marked their starring feature film debut.
       The Stooges, who appeared in numerous short films produced by Columbia from the 1930s through 1950s, also had walk-ons and guest spots in several 1930s features. According to a 1959 Daily Variety news item, the Stooges were on the verge of retiring when Columbia's television subsidiary, Screen Gems, released the shorts to television, creating a new audience for the Stooges. The upsurge in popularity led to a series of feature films starring the trio, culminating with the 1965 Columbia film The Outlaws Is Coming (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70). Joe De Rita made his debut as one of the Stooges in Have Rocket-Will Travel, replacing Joe Besser.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1959

Released in United States 1959