INNOCENCE


1m 2001

Brief Synopsis

Two lovers discover each other 50 years after their first affair.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Release Date
2001
Production Company
Cinemedia Corp; Premium Movie Partnership; South Australian Film Corporation (Safc)
Distribution Company
Arsenal Filmverleih; Bodega Films; Cdi Films; Curzon Artificial Eye; Frenetic Films; Independent Distribution Partnership (Idp); Mediafilm; Paradiso Entertainment; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
Location
Adelaide, Australia

Technical Specs

Duration
1m

Synopsis

Two lovers discover each other 50 years after their first affair.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Release Date
2001
Production Company
Cinemedia Corp; Premium Movie Partnership; South Australian Film Corporation (Safc)
Distribution Company
Arsenal Filmverleih; Bodega Films; Cdi Films; Curzon Artificial Eye; Frenetic Films; Independent Distribution Partnership (Idp); Mediafilm; Paradiso Entertainment; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
Location
Adelaide, Australia

Technical Specs

Duration
1m

Articles

Innocence (2000)


Paul Cox's Innocence (2000) brings together three of the director's favorite themes: a sympathetic and nuanced portrayal of mature characters, a focus on romantic relationships, and a fascination with memory. In this film, an elderly couple in Australia reignites a love affair from their youth in Belgium immediately after the war. In an interview with the critic Molly Haskell at the time of the film's U.S. release, Cox stated that the source of inspiration was a family reunion photograph: "Mother and Father never got on that well, but they were caught walking away from the camera on a curling path. They were close together, arms around each other in a way they never did in life. There was something forlorn and beautiful about it. It was, for me, a sudden illumination: the world as it really is." Elsewhere, Cox has described the film as being about "the sense of loss and the sense of longing which we all carry through our lives."

Paul Cox was born in 1940 in Venlo, the Netherlands. His father Wim Cox was a photographer and documentary filmmaker; one can see excerpts from his 1936 film "Course of Life" in Gerrit Messiaen and Robert Visser's 1996 documentary entitled A Journey with Paul Cox, which is available on the DVD edition of Vincent (1987). In 1963 Paul Cox moved to Australia, where he opened a photographic studio, taught filmmaking in an art school, and made a series of documentary films. His first widely seen feature was Kostas (1979), a drama about a relationship between a middle-aged Greek immigrant and a younger woman. Lonely Hearts (1982) extended his success with greater critical acclaim and U.S. distribution.

Cox's real international breakthrough was Man of Flowers (1983), which drew an enthusiastic response after its screening in Un Certain Regard at the Cannes film festival. The use of Super8 film stock during its flashback scenes stands out as one of the director's most memorable stylistic touches. Cox has continued to use Super8 footage in many of his subsequent films, including Innocence, explaining that it has "a much stronger sense of the past." Despite the challenges of independent filmmaking and his choice of decidedly non-commercial topics -- such as an elderly woman dying of cancer in A Woman's Tale (1991) -- he has managed to produce nearly thirty feature-length films, TV movies and documentaries to date.

Innocence was shot on a budget of under $900,000; the decision to set the flashback scenes in Belgium was due in part to Belgian funding requirements. The prolific lead actor Charles "Bud" Tingwell (1923-2009) was perhaps best known for his performance as Denny in Breaker Morant (1980). Julia Blake is a longtime collaborator with Paul Cox, having appeared in most of his major films. Terry Norris, the actor who plays Claire's husband John, is Julia Blake's real-life husband.

When the film was released in the U.S., Molly Haskell compared it favorably to A Woman's Tale, writing that Innocence is "no less adventurous in its absolute indifference to the youth demographics that dominate movie thinking, or in its breaking of the taboo against love among the elderly. Roger Ebert praised it as "the most passionate and tender love story in many years." The film won the FIPRESCI Prize at the Taormina International Film Festival "for the originality of its theme, the warmth of its approach and its superior performances."

Production, Script and Direction: Paul Cox
Music: Paul Grabowsky
Directory of Photography: Tony Clark
Film Editing: Simon Whitington
Production Design: Tony Cronin
Cast: Julia Blake (Claire); Charles "Bud" Tingwell (Andreas); Kristine Van Pellicom (Young Claire); Kenny Aernouts (Young Andreas); Terry Norris (John); Marta Dusseldorp (Monique); Robert Menzies (David); Chris Haywood (Minister); Norman Kaye (Gerald); Joey Kennedy (Sally); Liz Windsor (Maudie); Dawn Klingberg (Restaurant Owner); Peter Berger (Doctor #1); Kate Roberts (Doctor #2).
C-94m.

by James Steffen

Sources:
Ebert, Roger. Review of Innocence. Chicago Sun-Times, September 7, 2001.
Haskell, Molly. "Daring to Make a Love Story of Life's Last Chapter." New York Times. August 19, 2001, p.AR9.
Lewis, Glen. Australian Movies and the American Dream. New York: Praeger, 1987.
French, Lisa. "An overview of Innocence and Paul Cox's comments at the 49th Melbourne International Film Festival." Metro Magazine, No. 124/125 (2000): 16-19.
Innocence (2000)

Innocence (2000)

Paul Cox's Innocence (2000) brings together three of the director's favorite themes: a sympathetic and nuanced portrayal of mature characters, a focus on romantic relationships, and a fascination with memory. In this film, an elderly couple in Australia reignites a love affair from their youth in Belgium immediately after the war. In an interview with the critic Molly Haskell at the time of the film's U.S. release, Cox stated that the source of inspiration was a family reunion photograph: "Mother and Father never got on that well, but they were caught walking away from the camera on a curling path. They were close together, arms around each other in a way they never did in life. There was something forlorn and beautiful about it. It was, for me, a sudden illumination: the world as it really is." Elsewhere, Cox has described the film as being about "the sense of loss and the sense of longing which we all carry through our lives." Paul Cox was born in 1940 in Venlo, the Netherlands. His father Wim Cox was a photographer and documentary filmmaker; one can see excerpts from his 1936 film "Course of Life" in Gerrit Messiaen and Robert Visser's 1996 documentary entitled A Journey with Paul Cox, which is available on the DVD edition of Vincent (1987). In 1963 Paul Cox moved to Australia, where he opened a photographic studio, taught filmmaking in an art school, and made a series of documentary films. His first widely seen feature was Kostas (1979), a drama about a relationship between a middle-aged Greek immigrant and a younger woman. Lonely Hearts (1982) extended his success with greater critical acclaim and U.S. distribution. Cox's real international breakthrough was Man of Flowers (1983), which drew an enthusiastic response after its screening in Un Certain Regard at the Cannes film festival. The use of Super8 film stock during its flashback scenes stands out as one of the director's most memorable stylistic touches. Cox has continued to use Super8 footage in many of his subsequent films, including Innocence, explaining that it has "a much stronger sense of the past." Despite the challenges of independent filmmaking and his choice of decidedly non-commercial topics -- such as an elderly woman dying of cancer in A Woman's Tale (1991) -- he has managed to produce nearly thirty feature-length films, TV movies and documentaries to date. Innocence was shot on a budget of under $900,000; the decision to set the flashback scenes in Belgium was due in part to Belgian funding requirements. The prolific lead actor Charles "Bud" Tingwell (1923-2009) was perhaps best known for his performance as Denny in Breaker Morant (1980). Julia Blake is a longtime collaborator with Paul Cox, having appeared in most of his major films. Terry Norris, the actor who plays Claire's husband John, is Julia Blake's real-life husband. When the film was released in the U.S., Molly Haskell compared it favorably to A Woman's Tale, writing that Innocence is "no less adventurous in its absolute indifference to the youth demographics that dominate movie thinking, or in its breaking of the taboo against love among the elderly. Roger Ebert praised it as "the most passionate and tender love story in many years." The film won the FIPRESCI Prize at the Taormina International Film Festival "for the originality of its theme, the warmth of its approach and its superior performances." Production, Script and Direction: Paul Cox Music: Paul Grabowsky Directory of Photography: Tony Clark Film Editing: Simon Whitington Production Design: Tony Cronin Cast: Julia Blake (Claire); Charles "Bud" Tingwell (Andreas); Kristine Van Pellicom (Young Claire); Kenny Aernouts (Young Andreas); Terry Norris (John); Marta Dusseldorp (Monique); Robert Menzies (David); Chris Haywood (Minister); Norman Kaye (Gerald); Joey Kennedy (Sally); Liz Windsor (Maudie); Dawn Klingberg (Restaurant Owner); Peter Berger (Doctor #1); Kate Roberts (Doctor #2). C-94m. by James Steffen Sources: Ebert, Roger. Review of Innocence. Chicago Sun-Times, September 7, 2001. Haskell, Molly. "Daring to Make a Love Story of Life's Last Chapter." New York Times. August 19, 2001, p.AR9. Lewis, Glen. Australian Movies and the American Dream. New York: Praeger, 1987. French, Lisa. "An overview of Innocence and Paul Cox's comments at the 49th Melbourne International Film Festival." Metro Magazine, No. 124/125 (2000): 16-19.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the Air Canada People's Choice Award for Best Film and co-winner, along with Agnes Jaoui's "Le Gout Des Autres," of the Grand Prix of the Americas at the 2000 Montreal World Film Festival.

Winner of the Fipresci prize at the 2000 Taormina international Film Festival.

Released in United States Summer August 17, 2001

Released in United States August 31, 2001

Released in United States on Video December 10, 2002

Released in United States 2000

Released in United States June 2000

Released in United States July 2000

Released in United States September 2000

Released in United States October 2000

Released in United States 2001

Shown at Vancouver International Film Festival September 22 - October 5, 2000.

Shown at Melbourne International Film Festival July 19 - August 6, 2000.

Shown at Montreal World Film Festival August 24 - September 4, 2000.

Shown at Sydney Film Festival June 9-23, 2000.

Shown at Taormina International Film Festival July 2-9, 2000.

Shown at Hamptons International Film Festival (World Cinema) October 11-15, 2000.

Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (Contemporary World Cinema) May 24 - June 17, 2001.

Completed shooting June 12, 1999.

Began shooting May 18, 1999.

1:1.85

Released in United States Summer August 17, 2001 (NY)

Released in United States August 31, 2001 (Los Angeles)

Released in United States on Video December 10, 2002

Released in United States 2000 (Shown at Vancouver International Film Festival September 22 - October 5, 2000.)

Released in United States 2000 (Shown at Melbourne International Film Festival July 19 - August 6, 2000.)

Released in United States 2000 (Shown at Montreal World Film Festival August 24 - September 4, 2000.)

Released in United States June 2000 (Shown at Sydney Film Festival June 9-23, 2000.)

Released in United States July 2000 (Shown at Taormina International Film Festival July 2-9, 2000.)

Released in United States September 2000 (Shown at Telluride Film Festival September 1-4, 2000.)

Released in United States October 2000 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles International Film Festival (European Showcase) October 19-26, 2000.)

Released in United States October 2000 (Shown at Hamptons International Film Festival (World Cinema) October 11-15, 2000.)

Released in United States 2001 (Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (Contemporary World Cinema) May 24 - June 17, 2001.)