Titanic


3h 17m 1997

Brief Synopsis

Lovers from opposite sides of the tracks find their love tested during the maiden voyage of the doomed ocean liner.

Film Details

Also Known As
Titanic 3D
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Action
Adventure
Historical
Period
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Rosarito, Mexico; Los Angeles, California, USA; United Kingdom; Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
3h 17m

Synopsis

After winning a trip on the RMS Titanic during a dockside card game, American Jack Dawson spots the society girl Rose DeWitt Bukater who is on her way to Philadelphia to marry her rich snob fiance Cal Hockley. Rose feels helplessly trapped by her situation and makes her way to the aft deck and thinks of suicide until she is rescued by Jack. Cal is therefore obliged to invite Jack to dine at their first-class table where he suffers through the slights of his snobbish hosts. In return, he spirits Rose off to third class for an evening of dancing, giving her the time of her life. Deciding to forsake her intended future all together, Rose asks Jack, who has made his living making sketches on the streets of Paris, to draw her in the nude wearing the invaluable blue diamond Cal has given her. Cal finds out and has Jack locked away. Soon afterwards, the ship hits an iceberg and Rose must find Jack while both must run from Cal even as the ship sinks deeper into the freezing water.

Crew

Donovan A. Scott

Visual Effects

Frank Aalbers

Visual Effects

Victor Abbene

Lighting Technician

Mimi Abers

Visual Effects

Jorge Acosta

Production Assistant

Carolyn Adams

Grip

Jeff D Adams

Key Grip

Sarah Adams

Music

John Adamson

Grip

Eddie Adolph

Accounting Assistant

Jon Aghassian

Art Department

Florentino Aguilar

Foreman

Benitor Aguilar Perez

Other

Joaquin Alcantara Jimenez

Other

Scott L Alexander

Miniatures

Tim Alexander

Visual Effects

Larry Alicata

Driver

Anthony Allegre

Production Coordinator

Lucy Allen

Stunts

Scotty Allen

Gaffer

Luis Altamirano

Foreman

John Altman

Music Producer

John Altman

Consultant

Dr. Nora Alvarez

Medic

Armando Amador

Production Accountant

Enriqueta Amador

Accounting Assistant

Luis Eduardo Ambriz

Special Effects

Isabel Amezcua

Hair Assistant

Michael Amorelli

Rigging Gaffer

Paul Amorelli

Best Boy

Danny Anaya

Grip

Tony Anderson

Motion Control

Kris Andersson

Other

Maria Luisa Andrade

Costumes

Bernd Angerer

Animator

Allan Angus

Other

Tony Anscombe

Adr Mixer

Nathan Arbuthnott

Special Effects

Vanessa Armanino Lopez

Production Assistant

Amy Arnold

Set Costumer

Edna Arriola

Casting

J H Arrufat

Dialogue Editor

Ricardo Arvizu

Grip

Hunter Athey

Visual Effects

Alejandro Avendano Luhrs

Stunts

Joni Avery

Stunts

Mikey Avery

Stunts

Rick Avery

Stunts

Michael Axinn

Assistant Sound Editor

Nat D. Ayer

Music

Frank Ayre

Miniatures

Larry Babbitz

Caterer

Michael Backauskas

Editor

T.c. Badalato

Assistant Director

Jeanie Baker

Costumes

Deborah Ball

Hair

James Barber

Assistant Camera Operator

Christopher Barron

Other

Craig Barron

Visual Effects Supervisor

Roger Barton

Associate Editor

Jeff Basinski

Art Department

Andy Bass

Assistant Engineer

Bobbie Bates

Other

Peter Baustaedter

Matte Painter

Hugo Baylon Payan

Production Assistant

Mat Beck

Visual Effects Supervisor

Brendan Beebe

Audio

Scott Beebe

Other

Scott Begunia

Art Department

Thad Beier

Visual Effects

Dana Belcastro

Production Supervisor

Jessica Bellfort

Assistant Sound Editor

Tom Bellfort

Sound Editor

Tony Bendt

Grip

Sheryl Benko

Production Assistant

Andy Bennett

Stunts

Dennis Bennett

Visual Effects

Lee Berger

Visual Effects

Irving Berlin

Music

Sandy Berumen

Stunts

Rufus Best

Construction

Matt Bilski

Production Assistant

Tony Bixby

Other

Bill Black

Editor

David Bleich

Visual Effects

Deborah 'cha' Blevins

Costumes

Graham Blinco

Foreman

Graham Blinco

Production

Kirk Bloom

Camera Assistant

Kathleen Bobak

Assistant Director

Daniel Boccoli

Editing

Simone Boisseree

Stunts

Paul Bolton

Best Boy

Kit Bonner

Consultant

Dan Bonnin

Other

John Bonnin

Other

Beau Borders

Assistant Sound Editor

Bob Bornstein

Music

Alvaro Bortolini Camacho

Grip

Laura Borzelli

Makeup

Glenn Boswell

Stunts

Buddy Botham

Generator Operator

Kevin Botham

Other

Stephen Bourgeois

Foreman

Louis Bowen

Foreman

Vinnie Bowen

Foreman

Joey Box

Stunts

Christopher Boyes

Sound Designer

Christopher Boyes

Rerecording

Marsha L Bozeman

Costumes

Anita E Brabec

Makeup

Daniel Bradette

Property Master

Brian Bradley

Other

Richard Bradshaw

Stunts

Janet Brady

Stunts

Robyn Breen

Effects Assistant

Charles Brewer

Stunts

Tom Briggs

Driver

David Broberg

Assistant Editor

Chris Brown

Construction

Glenn Brown

Camera Assistant

Jill Brown

Stunts

Mark Brown

Digital Effects Supervisor

Mark A Brown

Other

Mark A Brown

Other

Seymour Brown

Music

John Bruno

Consultant

Keri Bruno

Set Production Assistant

Alfred Bryan

Music

C Mitchell Bryan

Miniatures

C Mitchell Bryan

Video Assist/Playback

Malcolm Bryce

Other

Wilebaldo Bucio

Stunts

John Buckley

Gaffer

Cheryl Budgett

Digital Effects Supervisor

Conrad Buff

Editor

Sonja Burchard

Visual Effects

Geoff Burdick

Production Associate

Lloyd Burke

Foreman

Bobby Burns

Stunts

Cathy Burrow

Rotoscope Animator

Larry Butcher

Visual Effects

Donald S. Butler

Visual Effects

Bruce Byall

Grip

Kirk Cadrette

Animator

Pavel Cajzl

Stunts

Cesar Camacho

Other

Craig Cameron

Assistant Director

James Cameron

Editor

James Cameron

Screenplay

James Cameron

Producer

James Cameron

Director Of Photography

Michael Cameron

Camera

Walt Cameron

Art Department

Jodi Campanaro

Visual Effects

Gustavo Campos Hernandez

Stunts

Jose L Canedo

Other

Craig Cannold

Accountant

Greg Cannom

Makeup

Casey Cannon

Visual Effects

Rosalio Cano

Best Boy

Cecilia Cardwell

Other

Jose Antonio Carmona

Grip

Bruce Carothers

Grip

Russell Carpenter

Director Of Photography

Marco Carranza

Art Assistant

Ignacio Carreno

Stunts

Debbie Lee Carrington

Stunts

Bryan Carroll

Editor

Dave Carson

Visual Effects Supervisor

Jorge Casares

Stunts

Aaron Cash

Other

Juan Jose Casillas Rivera

Other

John Casino

Stunts

Marc Cass

Stunts

George A Cassell

Set Production Assistant

Eugenio Casta

Set Designer

Lucia Castaneda

Construction Coordinator

Gustavo Castellanos

Props

Jose Castillo

Driver

Mike Castillo

Visual Effects

Paula Catania

Post-Production

Michael P Catanzarite

Grip

Vince Catlin

Other

Amy Caton-ford

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Robert L Catron

Assistant

Rocio Ceja

Costumes

Camille Cellucci

Visual Effects

Joaquin Cervera

Camera Assistant

M Dominic Cetani

Other

Marcus Cetani

Foreman

Carlos Chacon Inota

Other

Joan Chamberlain

Other

Alan Chan

Visual Effects

Doc D Charbonneau

Stunts

Doug Chartier

Dolly Grip

Paul Cheung

Other

Robert Cheung

Other

Hugo Chew

Transportation Co-Captain

Paul C Ciancetta

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Titanic 3D
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Action
Adventure
Historical
Period
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Rosarito, Mexico; Los Angeles, California, USA; United Kingdom; Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
3h 17m

Award Wins

Set Decoration

1997

Best Cinematography

1997
Russell Carpenter

Best Cinematography

1997

Best Costume Design

1997

Best Director

1997
James Cameron

Best Director

1997
James Cameron

Best Dramatic Score

1997
James Horner

Best Editing

1997

Best Film Editing

1998
Conrad Buff

Best Film Editing

1998
James Cameron

Best Film Editing

1998
Richard A Harris

Best Original Song

1997
James Horner

Best Picture

1997

Best Picture

1998

Best Score (Dramatic Picture)

1997

Best Song

1997

Best Sound

1997

Best Sound Effects Sound Editing

1997

Best Visual Effects

1997

Award Nominations

Best Actress

1997
Kate Winslet

Best Makeup

1997

Best Supporting Actress

1997
Gloria Stuart

Articles

Titanic (1997)


The story of the world's most famous shipwreck has been filmed more than 10 times, including a 1912 German version slapped together just days after the real tragedy and the British film long accepted as the definitive cinematic take on the incident, A Night to Remember (1958). But none have ever achieved the status of Titanic (1997), James Cameron's version of the incident. It was the most expensive movie made up to that time ($200 million) and remains the #1 box office champ, dropping only a few notches in that category when adjusted for inflation. It is tied with Lord of the Rings: Return of the King (2003) and Ben-Hur (1959) for the most Academy Awards won by a single picture (11) and with only one film, All About Eve (1950), for the most nominations (14). It has received dozens of other awards throughout the world, inspired numerous parodies and imitations, and spawned a Grammy-winning hit theme song ("My Heart Will Go On"). It has also spurred renewed interest in the historical facts and a huge increase in the demand for Titanic memorabilia and souvenirs. Although not universally acclaimed by critics, it is perhaps the perfect example of modern Hollywood blockbuster filmmaking, combining the most successful elements of multiple-genre narrative construction, state-of-the-art technical resources, and effective marketing strategies.

The film's tremendous success and popularity lie in its ability to integrate dazzling special effects and large-scale historical epic with a human drama that contemporary audiences could connect with on some level. That was Cameron's stated goal on this picture, "to integrate a very personal, very emotional, and very intimate filmmaking style with spectacle, and to try to make that not be kind of chocolate syrup on a cheeseburger." Cameron has said the movie was conceived as a love story, and that it was only the need to recreate the RMS Titanic and its sad fate that necessitated major visual effects. Whatever one's view of how effectively he achieved this integration, Titanic certainly drew praise for having instilled a sense of freshness and suspense into a story whose conclusion is not only foregone but globally known and for working against a nearly century-old air of tragedy and doom to open the picture with such optimism and excitement.

An entire book can be written about the technical aspects of making Titanic (and several have been), so it would be unwise to try to cover more than a few highlights here:

- The catastrophic rendezvous of the ship with a North Atlantic iceberg was recreated in real water by ramming a large-scale miniature of it into a miniature of the side of the ship constructed out of relatively easy-to-pierce lead. The underwater dolly carrying the iceberg replica was moved through the tank by a cable connected to a truck in the parking lot outside the studio of the special effects company Light Matters. Because of the speed and force needed to tear into the "ship," the impact was shot at 48 frames per second, allowing it to be projected back at the slower normal speed of the actual incident.

- Expert model makers from Vision Crew Unlimited were contracted to create details for the extremely exact 45-foot replica of the ship. The craftsmen made lifeboats, davits (the structures used to lower the lifeboats), cranes, ventilators, and 2,000 portholes with working windows. The 14-person team had to cast many of the pieces entirely out of brass because of scale and stress issues. For example, the davits on the real boat were 20 feet high; the models were 9 feet high and quite thin but still had to be positionable and functional, able to support the weight of a lifeboat with 24 model oars in it (even though, according to the model makers, the boats were covered and the oars not seen).

- The brass was also necessary because of temperatures. Cameron wanted to capture the drama in the Titanic's engine room when the crew was forced to put the ship into full reverse to avoid the collision, but there was no time to build a model engine room that would serve the purpose. So they used a World War II era Liberty ship troop transport they found still moored in San Francisco with engines very similar to those on the doomed ship, although only 1/3 the size. To force the scale, many of the catwalks, gauges, dials, even light bulbs were removed and replaced with tiny ones that made the engine room seem much larger. People were then composited into the shot. The only problem was, Liberty ship engine rooms can reach 140 degrees, so instead of the initially planned plastics, the new fittings had to be made of brass to prevent sagging and melting.

- Production designer Peter Lamont obtained the actual Titanic blueprints from the original shipbuilders. In the process, he discovered that the manufacturer of the ship's carpeting was still in business, so he had the firm recreate the exact patterns and colors used throughout the ship.

- James Cameron himself made the first of a dozen 12,378-foot dives to the sunken ship at the start of production in the fall of 1995 to shoot the fictional salvage operation that comprises the contemporary portion of the story. Overall, Cameron said the production, with its numerous challenges, hardships, and risks, had him feeling like he was on the bridge of the actual ship. "I could see the iceberg coming far away, but as hard as I turned that wheel there was just too much mass, too much inertia," he said in an interview put together by the Academy of Achievement in Washington, DC, in 1999. "You're in this situation where you feel quite doomed, and yet you still have to play by your own ethical standards, you know, no matter where that takes you. And ultimately that was the salvation, because I think if I hadn't done that...they might have pulled the plug....We held on. We missed the iceberg by that much."

The story of the RMS Titanic, of course, has not captured the public imagination this long simply because of the mechanical details of a supposedly unsinkable ship destroyed by an iceberg. More than 1,500 of its roughly 2,200 passengers died that April night in 1912; some by drowning, some from the impact of jumping or falling from the sinking ship, but most due to hypothermia in the frigid Atlantic waters as they screamed for help within earshot of the insufficient number of lifeboats carrying the survivors away. Yet it's the human story that lingers, and it was Cameron's intention to create such a narrative by focusing on the relationship of two people who meet on board, a freewheeling working class lad named Jack Dawson and young Rose DeWitt Bukater, unhappily engaged to a wealthy cad. Their love story forms the core of Titanic's drama and provides the contemporary framing device in which the aged Rose returns to the scene of the disaster.

The studio initially pushed for Matthew McConaughey to play Jack, but Cameron insisted on Leonardo DiCaprio. Thanks to his work in this, DiCaprio was able to move out of adolescent roles into adult leads, and he and co-star Kate Winslet were catapulted into international stardom.

Titanic also turned the spotlight on another performer, giving her first feature film appearance in eleven years and reminding the world that she was once a promising young starlet in the 1930s. As the older Rose, Gloria Stuart had her most noteworthy role since the days when she played in such movies as James Whale's The Old Dark House (1932) and The Invisible Man (1933), Busby Berkeley's Gold Diggers of 1935 (1935), and the Shirley Temple hits Poor Little Rich Girl (1936) and Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (1938). Stuart retired from films in 1946 to concentrate on a successful visual art career. She returned to acting in the mid-1970s when she was in her 60s, playing a number of bits and small supporting parts on television and the big screen until Cameron cast her in a role based in part on the well-known sculptor Beatrice Wood. Stuart's work earned her an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actress (at 86, the oldest nominee in Academy history), although she commented in her autobiography that she might have won had not so much of her performance been cut from the final release. Following this project, she appeared as a different character in The Titanic Chronicles (1999), a recreation of the 1912 Senate hearings about the oceanic disaster. All the major actors in that production previously appeared in other movies about the Titanic.

The bodies of many of the accident's victims were recovered by ships out of Halifax, Nova Scotia, and brought back there for burial. The film's success has brought floods of visitors to the gravesites. One that has caused quite a stir is marked with the name of engine room crew member J. Dawson. Cemetery workers say teenage girls are convinced the headstone marks the grave of Jack Dawson, the fictional character played by DiCaprio.

Director: James Cameron
Producers: Rae Sanchini, James Cameron, Jon Landau
Screenplay: James Cameron
Cinematography: Russell Carpenter
Editing: Conrad Buff, James Cameron, Richard A. Harris
Production Design: Peter Lamont
Art Direction: Martin Laing, Charles Lee
Original Music: James Horner
Cast: Leonardo DiCaprio (Jack Dawson), Kate Winslet (Rose DeWitt Bukater), Billy Zane (Cal Hockley), Kathy Bates (Molly Brown), Gloria Stuart (Old Rose), Bill Paxton (Brock Lovett).
C-210m. Letterboxed.

by Rob Nixon
Titanic (1997)

Titanic (1997)

The story of the world's most famous shipwreck has been filmed more than 10 times, including a 1912 German version slapped together just days after the real tragedy and the British film long accepted as the definitive cinematic take on the incident, A Night to Remember (1958). But none have ever achieved the status of Titanic (1997), James Cameron's version of the incident. It was the most expensive movie made up to that time ($200 million) and remains the #1 box office champ, dropping only a few notches in that category when adjusted for inflation. It is tied with Lord of the Rings: Return of the King (2003) and Ben-Hur (1959) for the most Academy Awards won by a single picture (11) and with only one film, All About Eve (1950), for the most nominations (14). It has received dozens of other awards throughout the world, inspired numerous parodies and imitations, and spawned a Grammy-winning hit theme song ("My Heart Will Go On"). It has also spurred renewed interest in the historical facts and a huge increase in the demand for Titanic memorabilia and souvenirs. Although not universally acclaimed by critics, it is perhaps the perfect example of modern Hollywood blockbuster filmmaking, combining the most successful elements of multiple-genre narrative construction, state-of-the-art technical resources, and effective marketing strategies. The film's tremendous success and popularity lie in its ability to integrate dazzling special effects and large-scale historical epic with a human drama that contemporary audiences could connect with on some level. That was Cameron's stated goal on this picture, "to integrate a very personal, very emotional, and very intimate filmmaking style with spectacle, and to try to make that not be kind of chocolate syrup on a cheeseburger." Cameron has said the movie was conceived as a love story, and that it was only the need to recreate the RMS Titanic and its sad fate that necessitated major visual effects. Whatever one's view of how effectively he achieved this integration, Titanic certainly drew praise for having instilled a sense of freshness and suspense into a story whose conclusion is not only foregone but globally known and for working against a nearly century-old air of tragedy and doom to open the picture with such optimism and excitement. An entire book can be written about the technical aspects of making Titanic (and several have been), so it would be unwise to try to cover more than a few highlights here: - The catastrophic rendezvous of the ship with a North Atlantic iceberg was recreated in real water by ramming a large-scale miniature of it into a miniature of the side of the ship constructed out of relatively easy-to-pierce lead. The underwater dolly carrying the iceberg replica was moved through the tank by a cable connected to a truck in the parking lot outside the studio of the special effects company Light Matters. Because of the speed and force needed to tear into the "ship," the impact was shot at 48 frames per second, allowing it to be projected back at the slower normal speed of the actual incident. - Expert model makers from Vision Crew Unlimited were contracted to create details for the extremely exact 45-foot replica of the ship. The craftsmen made lifeboats, davits (the structures used to lower the lifeboats), cranes, ventilators, and 2,000 portholes with working windows. The 14-person team had to cast many of the pieces entirely out of brass because of scale and stress issues. For example, the davits on the real boat were 20 feet high; the models were 9 feet high and quite thin but still had to be positionable and functional, able to support the weight of a lifeboat with 24 model oars in it (even though, according to the model makers, the boats were covered and the oars not seen). - The brass was also necessary because of temperatures. Cameron wanted to capture the drama in the Titanic's engine room when the crew was forced to put the ship into full reverse to avoid the collision, but there was no time to build a model engine room that would serve the purpose. So they used a World War II era Liberty ship troop transport they found still moored in San Francisco with engines very similar to those on the doomed ship, although only 1/3 the size. To force the scale, many of the catwalks, gauges, dials, even light bulbs were removed and replaced with tiny ones that made the engine room seem much larger. People were then composited into the shot. The only problem was, Liberty ship engine rooms can reach 140 degrees, so instead of the initially planned plastics, the new fittings had to be made of brass to prevent sagging and melting. - Production designer Peter Lamont obtained the actual Titanic blueprints from the original shipbuilders. In the process, he discovered that the manufacturer of the ship's carpeting was still in business, so he had the firm recreate the exact patterns and colors used throughout the ship. - James Cameron himself made the first of a dozen 12,378-foot dives to the sunken ship at the start of production in the fall of 1995 to shoot the fictional salvage operation that comprises the contemporary portion of the story. Overall, Cameron said the production, with its numerous challenges, hardships, and risks, had him feeling like he was on the bridge of the actual ship. "I could see the iceberg coming far away, but as hard as I turned that wheel there was just too much mass, too much inertia," he said in an interview put together by the Academy of Achievement in Washington, DC, in 1999. "You're in this situation where you feel quite doomed, and yet you still have to play by your own ethical standards, you know, no matter where that takes you. And ultimately that was the salvation, because I think if I hadn't done that...they might have pulled the plug....We held on. We missed the iceberg by that much." The story of the RMS Titanic, of course, has not captured the public imagination this long simply because of the mechanical details of a supposedly unsinkable ship destroyed by an iceberg. More than 1,500 of its roughly 2,200 passengers died that April night in 1912; some by drowning, some from the impact of jumping or falling from the sinking ship, but most due to hypothermia in the frigid Atlantic waters as they screamed for help within earshot of the insufficient number of lifeboats carrying the survivors away. Yet it's the human story that lingers, and it was Cameron's intention to create such a narrative by focusing on the relationship of two people who meet on board, a freewheeling working class lad named Jack Dawson and young Rose DeWitt Bukater, unhappily engaged to a wealthy cad. Their love story forms the core of Titanic's drama and provides the contemporary framing device in which the aged Rose returns to the scene of the disaster. The studio initially pushed for Matthew McConaughey to play Jack, but Cameron insisted on Leonardo DiCaprio. Thanks to his work in this, DiCaprio was able to move out of adolescent roles into adult leads, and he and co-star Kate Winslet were catapulted into international stardom. Titanic also turned the spotlight on another performer, giving her first feature film appearance in eleven years and reminding the world that she was once a promising young starlet in the 1930s. As the older Rose, Gloria Stuart had her most noteworthy role since the days when she played in such movies as James Whale's The Old Dark House (1932) and The Invisible Man (1933), Busby Berkeley's Gold Diggers of 1935 (1935), and the Shirley Temple hits Poor Little Rich Girl (1936) and Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (1938). Stuart retired from films in 1946 to concentrate on a successful visual art career. She returned to acting in the mid-1970s when she was in her 60s, playing a number of bits and small supporting parts on television and the big screen until Cameron cast her in a role based in part on the well-known sculptor Beatrice Wood. Stuart's work earned her an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actress (at 86, the oldest nominee in Academy history), although she commented in her autobiography that she might have won had not so much of her performance been cut from the final release. Following this project, she appeared as a different character in The Titanic Chronicles (1999), a recreation of the 1912 Senate hearings about the oceanic disaster. All the major actors in that production previously appeared in other movies about the Titanic. The bodies of many of the accident's victims were recovered by ships out of Halifax, Nova Scotia, and brought back there for burial. The film's success has brought floods of visitors to the gravesites. One that has caused quite a stir is marked with the name of engine room crew member J. Dawson. Cemetery workers say teenage girls are convinced the headstone marks the grave of Jack Dawson, the fictional character played by DiCaprio. Director: James Cameron Producers: Rae Sanchini, James Cameron, Jon Landau Screenplay: James Cameron Cinematography: Russell Carpenter Editing: Conrad Buff, James Cameron, Richard A. Harris Production Design: Peter Lamont Art Direction: Martin Laing, Charles Lee Original Music: James Horner Cast: Leonardo DiCaprio (Jack Dawson), Kate Winslet (Rose DeWitt Bukater), Billy Zane (Cal Hockley), Kathy Bates (Molly Brown), Gloria Stuart (Old Rose), Bill Paxton (Brock Lovett). C-210m. Letterboxed. by Rob Nixon

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated for the 1997 Golden Laurel award (James Cameron and Jon Landau) by the Producers Guild of America.

Nominated in the feature film category for the 1997 Outstanding Achievement Awards sponsored by the American Society of Cinematographers.

Winner of the 1997 award for Best Production Design from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

Winner of the 1997 Eddie Award for best editing in a motion picture by the American Cinema Editors (ACE).

Winner of the 1997 Outstanding Directorial Achievement award from the Directors Guild of America.

Winner two awards including Best Cinematography and Best Original Score from the 1997 Chicago Film Critics Association.

Released in United States Winter December 19, 1997

Re-released in United States Spring April 4, 2012

Re-released in United States December 1, 2017

Released in United States on Video September 1, 1998

Released in United States November 1997

Released in United States November 18, 1997

Released in United States February 1998

Released in United States February 7, 1998

Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival (Opening Night) November 1-10, 1997.

Shown at Olso Film Days in Oslo, Norway February 6-12, 1998.

Caleb Deschanel, director of photography for the modern "wrap around" portion of the film, was replaced by Russell Carpenter on August 20, 1996.

Director James Cameron reportedly waived his fees and only received about $25 million out of the almost $2 billion grosses worldwide.

With at least 25 million units sold in the United States along, and another 32 million units sold overseas, this is the top-selling video title of any kind -- live-action or animated -- worldwide.

Photography on the modern "wrap around" portion of the film, featuring Bill Paxton as a salvage operator, began in July in Nova Scotia. The historical portion of the film begins shooting in Mexico in September.

Began shooting mid July 1996.

Released in United States Winter December 19, 1997

Re-released in United States Spring April 4, 2012

Re-released in United States December 1, 2017

Released in United States on Video September 1, 1998

Released in United States November 1997 (Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival (Opening Night) November 1-10, 1997.)

Released in United States November 18, 1997 (Shown in London (Empire Cinema, Leicester Square) November 18, 1997 for the Cinema and Film Benevolent Fund's 51st Royal Film Performance.)

Released in United States February 1998 (Shown at Olso Film Days in Oslo, Norway February 6-12, 1998.)

Completed shooting March 23, 1997.

Nominated for the 1997 award for Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen by the Writers Guild of America (WGA).

Released in United States February 7, 1998 (Shown in Kaliningrad, Russia February 7, 1998.)