Recess: School's Out


1h 22m 2001

Brief Synopsis

For the kids of Third Street School, there's only one thing better than recess, and that's summer vacation. It's been a long, hard year, and now, T.J. Detweiler is ready to play hard--he's got nothing to do except hang out with friends. T.J.'s plans go awry, however, when he finds out that all his p

Film Details

Also Known As
Cour de recre: Vive les vacances!, La Cour de recre: Vive les vacances!
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2001
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 22m

Synopsis

For the kids of Third Street School, there's only one thing better than recess, and that's summer vacation. It's been a long, hard year, and now, T.J. Detweiler is ready to play hard--he's got nothing to do except hang out with friends. T.J.'s plans go awry, however, when he finds out that all his pals are going away to summer camp without him--leaving him alone all summer. His boredom comes to an end when, riding his bike past school, T.J. notices an empty light emanating from the main building. Convinced that something weird is going on in the school, he tries to tell his parents and the local cops who dismiss him. A series of events leads him to uncover a horrible scheme that not only does away with summer vacation--but eliminates summer itself. Former principal Dr. Benedict, who once tried to outlaw recess, now plans to use a laser beam to create winter year-round. To foil this, T.J. calls on all his friends, who are then joined by the faculty in a schoolwide effort to save summer.

Crew

David Adler

Other

Pamela Adlon

Other

Kenneth J Alford

Song

Elliot Anders

Editing

Joe Ansolabehere

Producer

Joe Ansolabehere

From Story

Joe Ansolabehere

Story By

Mark Archuleta

Other Writer

Steve Arenas

Post-Production Supervisor

Bruce Babcock

Music Conductor

Bruce Babcock

Original Music

Bruce Babcock

Consultant

Sung-chul Ban

Animation Director

Francis Barrios

Storyboard Artist

Don Barrozo

Other

Laurie Bean

Assistant Engineer

Kevin Bernier

Production Associate

Robert Berryhill

Song

Mark Bollinger

Post-Production Coordinator

Mars Bonfire

Song

Allyson Bosch

Voice Casting

Allyson Bosch

Adr Supervisor

Marshall Bowen

Original Music

Susan Bradley

Other

Mark Brammeier

Production

Jeanette Browning

Adr

Cary Butler

Music

Russell Calabrese

Other

John I Carrillo

Production

John Carter

Song

Dominick Certo

Music Editor

Mi-kyung Chang

Interpreter

Mi-hye Cho

Animator

Mi-suk Cho

Production

Myung-a Cho

Layout Artist

Se-jeong Cho

Animator

Sung-hwan Cho

Visual Effects

Un-cheal Cho

Other

Bok-soon Choi

Background Artist

Hea-joung Choi

Animator

Jin-hee Choi

Visual Effects

Jung-won Choi

Visual Effects

Sung-wook Choi

Layout Artist

Yoon-young Choi

Background Artist

Plamen Christov

Visual Effects Designer

Plamen Christov

Other

Jae-hee Chung

Other

Terry Claborn

Color Timer

Darren Clark

Visual Effects

Harvey Cohen

Original Music

Harvey Cohen

Song

Keith Cohen

Song

Brian E Cole

Visual Effects

Andrea Coleman

Other

Ricky D'shon Collins

Other

Patrick Connolly

Song

Dawn Connors

Script Coordinator

Christine Craig

Other

Randy Crenshaw

Other

Tom Dahl

Rerecording

Patrick Dalton

Rendering Artist

Joe Davenport

Other

Barry Devorzon

Song

Jennifer Dolde

Assistant Editor

Barbara Donatelli

Continuity

Joan Drake

Other

Mark Drop

Other Writer

Ken Dufva

Foley Artist

Robert Duran

Sound Design

Dennis Dutton

Assistant Editor

Jerry Edemann

Sound Editor

Louis L Edemann

Supervising Sound Editor

Ronald Eng

Sound Designer

Rick Evans

Other

Blake Mciver Ewing

Other

William Exter

Continuity

Robert Fernandez

Music

Michael Ferris

Other Writer

Sandy Frame

Storyboard Artist

Nancy Frazen

Editor

James Fuller

Song

Pete Gaffney

Other Writer

Eric Garcia

Assistant

Marvin Gaye

Song

Christopher K Gee

Editing

Paul Germain

Producer

Paul Germain

From Story

Paul Germain

Story By

Paul Germain

Dialogue Director

Leonard T Geschke

Sound Editor

Michael Giammarese

Production Accountant

Timothy Gilbert

Song

Robert Goulet

Song Performer

Michael Gracey

Production

Nicole Graham

Other

Jonathan Greenberg

Screenplay

Jonathan Greenberg

From Story

Jonathan Greenberg

Story By

Carolyn Guske

Other

Joel Halvorson

Other

Denis M Hannigan

Music

Denis M Hannigan

Song

Lee Harting

Other

Karen Hathaway

Assistant Editor

Brant Hawes

Production Manager

Ginny Hawes

Other

Jimi Hendrix

Song

Sun-mi Heo

Layout Artist

Gloria Hoffman

Other

Kent Holaday

Other

Tommy Holmes

Music

Yoo-mi Hong

Animator

Sun-wook Houng

Animator

Stark Howell

Storyboard Artist

Jamie Huang

Other

Robert Hughes

Other

Ivy Joe Hunter

Song

O'kelley Isley

Song

Ronald Isley

Song

Rudolph Isley

Song

Doug Jackson

Sound Editor

Jill Jacobs

Other

Bart Jennett

Other Writer

Jason Phillip Johnson

Rendering Artist

Rob Jones

Other

Eun-joo Jun

Background Artist

Baik-ma Jung

Layout Artist

Jae-young Jung

Layout Artist

Soo-yeon Jung

Animator

Doc Kane

Adr Mixer

Celia Kendrick

Storyboard Artist

Eric Keyes

Production Designer

Eric Keyes

Other

Bo-kyung Kim

Animator

Chan-joo Kim

Animation Director

Doo-you Kim

Animator

Hae-joung Kim

Visual Effects

Il Kim

Animation Director

Jane Kim

Production Accountant

Jong-beom Kim

Animator

Jong-tae Kim

Other

Mi-jin Kim

Animator

Mi-jung Kim

Visual Effects

Mi-sook Kim

Animator

Mi-young Kim

Animator

Min-sung Kim

Layout Artist

Myung-hwa Kim

Animator

Myung-suk Kim

Visual Effects

Sang-hee Kim

Visual Effects

Seo-han Kim

Animator

Seung-hwan Kim

Visual Effects

Seung-hwan Kim

Technical Director

Sung-eun Kim

Animator

Sung-ha Kim

Animator

Sung-hee Kim

Animator

Tae-jun Kim

Production

Wu-hyun Kim

Animator

Yong-ho Kim

Production Manager

You-hee Kim

Visual Effects

Young-che Kim

Layout Artist

Yu-min Kim

Production

Raymond King

Cgi Artist

Andrea Klein

Other

David Knott

Other

David Knott

Storyboard Artist

Steve Kohler

Other

Christopher Kracker

Production Supervisor

Ok-gil Kwon

Animator

Sang-kook Kwon

Animator

Angela Lee

Production

Gun-shik Lee

Animator

Gyu-chang Lee

Animator

Hee-jung Lee

Visual Effects

Hye-won Lee

Visual Effects

Hyun-ae Lee

Animator

Il-hyun Lee

Background Artist

In-suk Lee

Animator

Joon-woo Lee

Production Manager

Jun-hae Lee

Layout Artist

Kyung-hwa Lee

Animator

Kyung-pil Lee

Animator

Seung-hee Lee

Layout Artist

Seung-hee Lee

Color

Seung-ik Lee

Layout Artist

Suk-chun Lee

Production Coordinator

Sun-young Lee

Visual Effects

Yeon-kyeong Lee

Background Artist

Yoon-joo Lee

Animator

Yun-hee Lee

Animator

Paul Leka

Song

Terry Lennon

Other

Rachel Lipman

Other Writer

Joseph M Lohmar

Rendering Artist

Charlie Luce

Visual Effects

Charles Lyons

Effects Assistant

Galt Macdermot

Song

Andy Mackey

Other

Maria Delia Manhit

Continuity

Tris Mast

Props

Thomas Mazzocco

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Cour de recre: Vive les vacances!, La Cour de recre: Vive les vacances!
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2001
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 22m

Articles

Robert Stack, 1919-2003


Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84.

Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling.

Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger.

Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen.

His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942).

After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958).

Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name.

Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980).

Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles.

by Michael T. Toole
Robert Stack, 1919-2003

Robert Stack, 1919-2003

Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84. Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling. Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger. Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen. His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942). After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958). Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name. Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980). Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter February 16, 2001

Released in United States on Video August 7, 2001

Based on the ABC children's television series "Disney's Recess".

Released in United States Winter February 16, 2001

Released in United States on Video August 7, 2001