Dinosaur


1h 22m 2000

Brief Synopsis

A three-ton Iguanodon named Aladar, who is raised from the egg by a clan of lemurs and eventually reunited with his own kind, finds himself and the other dinosaurs in trouble when flaming meteors devastate the landscape and the water supply diminishes. In a race against time, the dinosaurs attempt t

Film Details

Also Known As
Dinosaure, Dinosaurs
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2000
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Burbank, California, USA; Kauai, Hawaii, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 22m

Synopsis

A three-ton Iguanodon named Aladar, who is raised from the egg by a clan of lemurs and eventually reunited with his own kind, finds himself and the other dinosaurs in trouble when flaming meteors devastate the landscape and the water supply diminishes. In a race against time, the dinosaurs attempt to reach the safety of their nesting grounds. When Aladar comes to the aid of a group of misfits unable to keep up with the breakneck pace of the herd, he makes an enemy of Kron, the stone-hearted leader of the group. Faced with such perils as treacherous rock slides and attacking Carnotaurs, Aladar and his friends must overcome tremendous obstacles before they can settle into a new life in a beautiful valley.

Crew

John Aardal

Camera Operator

Julius Aguimatang

Storyboard Artist

Archie K Ahuna

Visual Effects

Josie Aiello

Song Performer

Craig Aines

Best Boy

Timothy Albee

Animator

Eric M Algren

Other

Jacqueline Allard

Art Department

Doctor Donald L Alvarez

Other

Eric Alvarez

Production Assistant

H. Leah Amir

Production Assistant

Jason Anastas

Animator

Charles Anderson

Lighting

Grant Anderson

Lighting

Kurt Anderson

Storyboard Artist

Bennett Stephen Andrews

Other

Pete Anthony

Music Conductor

Arthur Argote

Visual Effects

Karl Armstrong

Assistant Editor

Cindy Lee Arnold

Accounting Assistant

Joyce Arrastia

Assistant Editor

Barry Atkinson

Art Department

Jeff Atmajian

Original Music

Jim Aupperle

Art Department

Jim Aupperle

Lighting

Mark Anthony Austin

Animator

Bill Aylsworth

Camera Operator

Hans Bacher

Art Department

Jason Bachinski

Production Assistant

Robert Bagley

Video

Jeffrey Baksinski

Visual Effects

Roger Balart

Other

Gary Balikian

Other

Lorenzo Russell Bambino

Assistant

Richard M Barnes

Audio

Lynn Basas

Art Assistant

Martin Baukind

Grip

Bobby 'boom' Beck

Animator

Michelle Beck

Other

Darren Bedwell

Other

Brian Behling

Visual Effects

Bruce Bell

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Judith A Bell

Background Painter

Judith A Bell

Visual Effects

Elissa Bello

Art Department

Michael Belzer

Animator

Doug Bennett

Animator

Robert M Berkus

Location Manager

Janet E Berlin

Other

Randy Berrett

Key Grip

Otto Emilio Betancourt

Best Boy Grip

James C Bette

Other

John Bindon

Art Department

Mark Blackham

Special Thanks To

Jennifer Blair

Assistant Production Coordinator

Dennis M Blakey

Other

Jennifer Blechschmid

Production Assistant

Baker Bloodworth

Coproducer

Mike Blum

Other

Robert Edward Boas

Other

Michael Boggs

Grip

Michael Bolds

Other

Russell Boles

Production Assistant

Jennifer Booth

Assistant Director

Beau Borders

Sound

Tamara Boutcher

Production Manager

Kevin Bowe

Accounting Assistant

Brett A. Boydstun

Assistant Production Coordinator

Christopher Boyes

Sound Supervisor

Christopher Boyes

Rerecording

Christopher Boyes

Sound Designer

Kim Boyle

Other

Kenneth Brain

Other

Justin Brandstater

Art Department

Rebecca Wilson Bresee

Animator

Al Broussard

Special Effects Supervisor

Alexandra Brown

Song Performer

Kaylee Michelle Brown

Assistant Director

Iyan Michael Bruce

Production Assistant

Thomas R Bryant

Editor

Marek Buchwald

Art Department

Bruce D. Buckley

Visual Effects

Stephen Buckley

Animator

Brent Burley

Other

James Burton

Line Producer

James Burton

Production Associate

Kent Burton

Animator

Eamonn Butler

Animator

Darrin Butters

Animator

Robert A Calvo

Other

Yancy Calzada

Animator

Brooks Campbell

Art Department

Brooks Campbell

Visual Effects

Jason Campbell

Other

Jim Capobianco

Storyboard Artist

Mark R Carlson

Other

Vince Caro

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Steven C Carpenter

Other

William T Carpenter

Other

Marcus Carter

Art Department

Floyd Casey

Lighting

Nhi Casey

Other

Craig Caton-largent

Other

Bernard O Ceguerra

Other

John Cejka

Audio

Lawrence Chai

Other

Yina Chang

Visual Effects

Mark Chapman

Consultant

Mark Cheng

Props Assistant

Candice Chinn

Other

Lisa Chino

Sound

Jennifer Cho

Production Assistant

Loren Chun

Audio

Terry Claborn

Color Timer

Audrey Clark

Production Assistant

Theresa Clark

Animator

Peter Clarke

Art Department

Glen Claybrook

Other

Stephanie Clifford

Camera Coordinator

Dwayne Colbert

Production Assistant

Danita Cole

Accounting Assistant

Charles Colladay

Other

Matthew M Collins

Production Assistant

D Wallace Colvard

Lighting

Craig Conwell

Assistant Editor

Mary Therese Corgan

Assistant

Jason Cosler

Production Assistant

Tena Cotton

Accounting Assistant

Christopher Cowan

Art Assistant

Stephen R Craig

Other

Christine Cram

Art Department

Doug Cram

Art Department

Robyn Crane

Lighting

Jeannette Cremarosa

Other

Lorrie Cross-holguin

Accounting Assistant

James Michael Crossley

Animator

Christian Cunnigham

Lighting

Nathaniel W Cushman

Set Production Assistant

Michael Daugherty

Animator

Lynn Davies

Song Performer

Jay N Davis

Animator

Lisa Davis

Assistant Editor

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Christopher A. Debiec

Production Coordinator

Brad Dechter

Original Music

Margaret A Decker

Other

Jeff Deckman

Story By

Guy Deel

Art Department

Karen Dejong

Other

Ricardo Delgado

Art Department

Ricardo Delgado

Storyboard Artist

John Derderian

Camera Operator

Dawnie Desantis

Production Assistant

Monique Deschamps

Animator

Diana Devries

Production Supervisor

Feliciano Di Girgio

Visual Effects

Ross Dickinson

Other

Stewart Dickson

Visual Effects

Liane Abel Dietz

Other

Gerard Dinardi

Production Manager

Lyly Do

Other

Julia Dole

Assistant Editor

Peter Dress

Assistant Production Coordinator

Elena Driskill

Other

Hank Driskill

Other

Dave M Drulias

Other

David J Dumas

Grip

John Dumas

Grip

Mark Duvall

Animator

Tony Eckert

Foley Mixer

Chris Edwards

Animator

Curtis Edwards

Animator

Jeff Edwards

Animator

Jerry A Eisenberg

Audio

Mark Empey

Other

Thom Enriquez

Story By

Thom Enriquez

From Story

Stacey Ernst-campbell

Production

Neil Eskuri

Digital Effects Supervisor

Frank Eulner

Sound Editor

Vincent G Everly

Best Boy

William Fadness

Camera Operator

Robert Falco

Other

Karen Faust

Assistant

Paul Felix

Art Department

Andre Fenley

Assistant Sound Editor

Esther Ferrer-cardona

Other

Chadd Ferron

Animator

Lisa A Fisher

Art Department

Bill Fletcher

Animator

Joel Fletcher

Animator

Marc Fleury

Other

Cory Rocco Florimonte

3-D Artist

Pamela Schell Focht

Special Thanks To

Bonnie Jean Foley

Production Coordinator

Stephen Foley

Other

Bobby L Fowler

Other

Andrew Francis

Production Supervisor

Marc Francouer

Other

Brian Franczak

Art Department

Film Details

Also Known As
Dinosaure, Dinosaurs
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2000
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Burbank, California, USA; Kauai, Hawaii, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 22m

Articles

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)


Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87.

He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama.

As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day.

Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops.

Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948.

With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade.

However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing.

If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church.

Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969).

In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater.

Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997).

Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk.

In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Ossie Davis (1917-2005)

Ossie Davis (1917-2005)

Ossie Davis, the distinguished African-American character actor, director and civil rights activist, died of natural causes on February 4 in Miami Beach, where he was filming a movie. He was 87. He was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917 in Cogdell, Georgia. His parents called him "R.C." When his mother registered his birth, the county clerk misunderstood her and thought she said "Ossie" instead of "R.C.," and the name stuck. He graduated high school in 1936 and was offered two scholarships: one to Savannah State College in Georgia and the other to the famed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, but he could not afford the tuition and turned them down. He eventually saved enough money to hitchhike to Washington, D.C., where he lived with relatives while attending Howard University and studied drama. As much as he enjoyed studying dramatics, Davis had a hunger to practice the trade professionally and in 1939, he left Howard University and headed to Harlem to work in the Rose McClendon Players, a highly respected, all-black theater ensemble in its day. Davis' good looks and deep voice were impressive from the beginning, and he quickly joined the company and remained for three years. With the onset of World War II, Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an all-black Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants before being transferred to Special Services to write and produce stage shows for the troops. Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in Jeb, a play about a returning black soldier who runs afoul of the Ku Klux Klan in the deep south. His co-star was Ruby Dee, an attractive leading lady who was one of the leading lights of black theater and film. Their initial romance soon developed into a lasting bond, and the two were married on December 9, 1948. With Hollywood making much more socially conscious, adult films, particularly those that tackled themes of race (Lonely Are The Brave, Pinky, Lost Boundaries all 1949), it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling for Davis. His first film, with which he co-starred with his wife Dee, was a tense Joseph L. Mankiewicz's prison drama with strong racial overtones No Way Out (1950). He followed that up with a role as a cab driver in Henry Hathaway's Fourteen Hours (1951). Yet for the most part, Davis and Dee were primarily stage actors, and made few film appearances throughout the decade. However, in should be noted that much of Davis time in the '50s was spent in social causes. Among them, a vocal protest against the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, and an alignment with singer and black activist Paul Robeson. Davis remained loyal to Robeson even after he was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies. Such affiliation led them to suspicions in the anti-Communist witch hunts of the early '50s, but Davis, nor his wife Dee, were never openly accused of any wrongdoing. If there was ever a decade that Ossie Davis was destined for greatness, it was undoubtly the '60s. He began with a hit Broadway show, A Raisin in the Sun in 1960, and followed that up a year later with his debut as a playwright - the satire, Purlie Victorious. In it, Davis starred as Purlie, a roustabout preacher who returns to southern Georgia with a plan to buy his former master's plantation barn and turn it into a racially integrated church. Although not an initial success, the play would be adapted into a Tony-award winning musical, Purlie years later. Yet just as important as his stage success, was the fact that Davis' film roles became much more rich and varied: a liberal priest in John Huston's The Cardinal (1963); an unflinching tough performance as a black soldier who won't break against a sadistic sergeant's racial taunts in Sidney Lumet's searing war drama The Hill (1965); and a shrewd, evil butler who turns the tables on his employer in Rod Serling's Night Gallery (1969). In 1970, he tried his hand at film directing, and scored a hit with Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), a sharp urban action comedy with Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques as two black cops trying to stop a con artist from stealing Harlem's poor. It's generally considered the first major crossover film for the black market that was a hit with white audiences. Elsewhere, he found roles in some popular television mini-series such as King, and Roots: The Next Generation (both 1978), but for the most part, was committed to the theater. Happily, along came Spike Lee, who revived his film career when he cast him in School Daze (1988). Davis followed that up with two more Lee films: Do the Right Thing (1989), and Jungle Fever (1991), which also co-starred his wife Dee. From there, Davis found himself in demand for senior character parts in many films throughtout the '90s: Grumpy Old Men (1993), The Client (1994), I'm Not Rappaport (1996), and HBO's remake of 12 Angry Men (1997). Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, In This Life Together, and in 2004, they were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors. Davis had been in Miami filming an independent movie called Retirement with co-stars George Segal, Rip Torn and Peter Falk. In addition to his widow Dee, Davis is survived by three children, Nora Day, Hasna Muhammad and Guy Davis; and seven grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the 2000 Golden Satellite Award for Best Sound (Frank Eulner) from the International Press Academy.

Released in United States on Video January 30, 2001

Released in United States Spring May 19, 2000

Film marks Disney's in-house feature debut in computer character animation.

Began shooting September 15, 1997.

Film combines live-action and computer animation.

Released in United States on Video January 30, 2001

Released in United States Spring May 19, 2000