The Deep End


1h 39m 2001

Brief Synopsis

Lake Tahoe, California. A mother wakes early one morning to find the body of her closeted seventeen-year-old son's lover impaled on an anchor on the beach of their lakefront home. With her husband away and nowhere to turn, she makes a reckless decision to move the body and hide it in the lake. Soon

Film Details

Also Known As
Bleu profond, Deep End
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2001
Production Company
Kent Hamilton; Truman Van Dyke
Distribution Company
Fox Searchlight Pictures
Location
Lake Tahoe, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m

Synopsis

Lake Tahoe, California. A mother wakes early one morning to find the body of her closeted seventeen-year-old son's lover impaled on an anchor on the beach of their lakefront home. With her husband away and nowhere to turn, she makes a reckless decision to move the body and hide it in the lake. Soon she finds herself and her family in even greater danger when the body is found and, impossibly, she is confronted by blackmailers. She tries desperately to raise the money, but repeatedly fails. Inexplicably, one of the blackmailers softens and begins to help her. But can she trust him? And how can she explain to her now suspicious son what's going on with this stranger who suddenly begins stopping by to see her?

Crew

Jessica Abroms

Technical Advisor

Julie Adams

Dialect Coach

Megan B Agosto

Assistant Editor

Megan Agosto

Post-Production Supervisor

Gianni Aliotti

Digital Effects Artist

Michael Anderson

Foley Recordist

Scott Ansell

Music

James Barber

Location Manager

Sivan Baron

Assistant

David Bergad

Sound Editor

Mark Berger

Rerecording

Bryan Berry

Medic

Buffy Beyer

Assistant Production Coordinator

Rhonda Bingham

Production

Everett Blix

Local Casting

Charles Bloomfield

Construction

Craig Borden

Assistant Director

Debbie Brubaker

Production Manager

Cynthia Bystrak

Grip

Dale Cannedy

Associate To Director

Paul Cardona

Construction

Lou Carlucci

Special Effects

James Carpenter

Construction

Xaime Casillas

Other

Carmel Cathi

Stand-In

Matthew Cavaliero

Props Assistant

Bundy Chanock

Other

Bundy Chanock

Medic

Judy Chesnut

Costume Supervisor

Katrina Chevalier

Hairdresser

Richard Chuang

Visual Effects Supervisor

Dennis R Clark

Driver

Missy Cohen

Music Editor

Todd Corman

Assistant Director

Francisco Cortes

Set Production Assistant

Ray Curtis

Construction

Raqueli Dahan

Makeup

Beth Depatie

Production Manager

Jeff Di Paolo

Craft Service

Louis Dicesare

Gaffer

Earl Douglas

Construction

Lori Dovi

Sound Mixer

Timothy R Durr

Best Boy

Robert Eber

Sound Mixer

Thom Ehle

Consultant

Kip Ellwood

Swing Gang

John Emory

Grip

Peter Epstein

Stunts

Gerard Facchini

Assistant Director

Patrick Farrell

Grip

Michael Farrow

Music

Warren Feldman

Assistant Camera Operator

Warren Feldman

Photography

Piotr Filipowski

Sound Effects Editor

Jason Fornal

Driver

Terri Fredlund

Production Assistant

Ellen Freund

Property Master

Rebecca Fulton

Script Supervisor

Anna Geyer

Dialogue Editor

Dale Gibson

Stunt Coordinator

Aura Gilge

Sound Effects Editor

Hayley Goggin

Set Production Assistant

David L Goodwine

Visual Effects Producer

Laura Greenlee

Coproducer

Chris Gridley

Assistant Sound Editor

Paul Gugliuzza

Medic

Nathan Gunn

Assistant Sound Editor

Christopher James Hall

Assistant Director

Kent Hamilton

Production Insurance

John M Hanashiro

Visual Effects Editor

Amanda Harding

Casting Associate

Sebastian Harms

Titles

Robert Hawk

Production Consultant

Jason Heapy

Visual Effects Producer

William Hobson

Grip

Michael Hoffer

Grip

Elizabeth Holding

Source Material (From Novel)

Maggie Holley-muzio

Production Assistant

Etina Hom

Boom Operator

Steve Hurson

Assistant Camera

James Jaber

Other

Renaldo Jackson

Generator Operator

Robert Jauregui

Stunts

Ben Jensen

Stunt Coordinator

Ethan Jensen

Stunts

Brook Johnson

Gaffer

Brent M Jones

Production Accountant

Ed Jones

Driver

William Judkins

Stunts

Mel Kangleon

Colorist

Ryan Khavari

Assistant

Kay Kimler

Stunts

Kimie Kimura-heane

Production Assistant

Matthew Kinney

Generator Operator

Michael Kitchens

Assistant Director

Richard Lacy

Photography

William Laczko

Driver

Kristen Lamantia

Office Production Assistant

Jerry Leonard

Original Music

Melvin G Liel

Driver

Debra Light

Assistant Editor

David Logie

Caterer

Hatch Logie

Caterer

Glenn Mack

Transportation Coordinator

Harlan Mack

Swing Gang

Patrick Maguire

Driver

Andon Major

Painter

Mindy Marin

Associate Producer

Mindy Marin

Casting

Robert Marty

Assistant Editor

Mato

Color Timer

Jill Mattson

Choreographer

Dwayne Mcclintock

Other

Dwayne Mcclintock

Camera Operator

Kelly Mcgehee

Production Designer

Scott Mcgehee

Screenplay

Scott Mcgehee

Co-Director

Scott Mcgehee

Producer

Paul Meehan

Dolly Grip

Sabrina Merics

Assistant Camera

Dana Michaelsen

Accounting Assistant

Marnie Moore

Foley Artist

Chris Moseley

Photography

Idrissa Moulaye Sene

Generator Operator

Dana Mulligan

Assistant Editor

Peter Nashel

Music

Jason Newmark

Set Production Assistant

John Nutt

Sound Editor

Giles Nuttgens

Director Of Photography

Margie O'malley

Foley Artist

Richard Olson

Props Assistant

Rod Olson

Construction

David Parker

Rerecording

Brad Peterman

Assistant Camera

Martha Pike

Assistant Editor

Michael Pizzuto

Key Grip

Maurice Joseph Ravel

Music

Frank Rinella

Foley Mixer

Elizabeth L Rogers

Camera

Lisa Rogers

Makeup

Sabrina A Rosen

Costume Designer

Andi Ruane

Grip

Pablo Santiago

Grip

Jeff Schonfield

Painter

David N Schrager

Assistant Director

David Schrager

Assistant Director

Jack Serino

Boom Operator

Nathan Serratore

Coordinator

Amy Sheldon

Music Coordinator

Jim Sheldon

Photography

Jack Shepphird

Boom Operator

David Siegel

Producer

David Siegel

Screenplay

David Siegel

Co-Director

Chris Slater

Grip

Larry Smith

Driver

Peter Burgess Smith

Generator Operator

Andrew D Stadler

Assistant Camera

Linda Stanley

Instructor

Jendy Stewart

Location Assistant

Hayley Stuppel

Set Costumer

Rob Sweeney

Director Of Photography

Christopher Tandon

Production Designer

Patti Tauscher

Foley Editor

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Music

Paige Thomas

Assistant Camera Operator

Christian Thompson

Production Coordinator

Chris Tolladay

Driver

David Torn

Music

Jay Townsend

Office Runner

Viet Tran

Other

Chris Trimble

Digital Effects

Christina Tucker

Adr Mixer

Gloria Uribe

Location Assistant

Truman Van Dyke

Production Insurance

Nanci Wenz

Set Decorator

John White

Construction

Christina Wilson

Assistant Art Director

David D B Wilson

Transportation Captain

Terry Wyner

Location Manager

Robert Zajonc

Helicopter Pilot

Bobby Zajonic

Helicopter Pilot

Patrick Zimmerli

Other

Lauren Zuckerman

Editor

Film Details

Also Known As
Bleu profond, Deep End
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2001
Production Company
Kent Hamilton; Truman Van Dyke
Distribution Company
Fox Searchlight Pictures
Location
Lake Tahoe, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m

Articles

Remake - The Deep End


THE RECKLESS MOMENT becomes THE DEEP END

In 1947 Elizabeth Sanxay Holding wrote a novel entitled The Blank Wall which was adapted for the screen in 1949 as The Reckless Moment. Directed by Max Ophuls, the suspense thriller focused on Lucia Harper (Joan Bennett), a housewife who goes to desperate lengths to protect her daughter Bea from being arrested for a murder. But did she really commit one? Lucia definitely saw the body because she disposed of it without her daughter's knowledge. And her world is thrown into further turmoil by an unexpected visit from a blackmailer (James Mason) who has some incriminating love letters to sell. The Reckless Moment was well received in its day and features what many now believe is one of Joan Bennett's best performances. It is also highly regarded by fans of Max Ophuls. Yet, the film is not available currently on video, DVD, or laserdisc.

So don't hold your breath waiting for the re-release anytime soon. However, an alternative is to go see The Deep End (2001), a new adaptation of Holding's original novel by the filmmaking team of Scott McGehee and David Siegel. While the central plot is basically the same as The Reckless Moment, the setting has been changed from a Southern California beachfront to Lake Tahoe and Bea, the suspect daughter in the original, has been transformed into Beau, a gay teenager who is running around with an untrustworthy older man. The Deep End enjoyed a flurry of early rave reviews from most of the mainstream critics but now that it is going into general release, we are seeing more mixed reactions from other viewers; some prefer the Max Ophuls 1949 version while others are finding some major plausibility problems with the behavior of Margaret Hall (Tilda Swinton), the gay teenager's mother. One thing everyone seems to agree on, however, is Tilda Swinton's tour-de-force performance as the frantic mother. Roger Ebert wrote, "She is always believable as this harassed, desperate, loving mother. She projects a kind of absorption in her task; she juggles blackmail, murder, bank loans, picking up the kids after school - it's as if the ordinary tasks keep her sane enough to deal with the dangers that surround her." Swinton has previously been seen in such offbeat indie efforts as Orlando (1992), The War Zone (1999) and Female Perversions (1996). Her most famous mainstream film to date is probably The Beach (2000) in which she played Sal, the manipulative commune member who has an affair with Leonardo DeCaprio. With a little luck, The Deep End should expose Swinton to a much wider audience.

FROM A PULP NOVEL TO A FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT FILM TO A BRAND NEW REMAKE

Depending on how you approach Original Sin it's either a new version of a classic pulp novel (Cornell Woolrich's Waltz Into Darkness) or the latest Hollywood remake of a foreign classic (Francois Truffaut's Mississippi Mermaid (1969). Either way it promises to be a smarter than usual psychological thriller with enough star power from Antonio Banderas and Angelina Jolie to constitute its own heat wave.

The basic story remains much the same. In the 1880s a Cuban plantation owner (Banderas) meets a mysterious American woman (Jolie) who's answering his ad for a bride placed in a Baltimore newspaper. Though Banderas wants only a good, stable wife he is unexpectedly swept up in a raging passion. Still, there are a few unsettling signs that all is not what it appears to be. Jolie doesn't quite match the original description he'd received from the States plus she has some unexplained scars on her back (caused by husband Billy Bob Thornton?) and a trunk that is always locked.

Original Sin was produced by Via Rosa, Michelle Pfeiffer's production company. Actually, Pfeiffer had originally planned to star in it before scheduling conflicts arose; she's still listed as producer. However, director-writer Michael Cristofer knew exactly who to put in the lead role: Angelina Jolie, who he had directed in her breakthrough film Gia (1998) (which won her Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild awards).

Getting Banderas proved to be a lucky coincidence. As the actor told Out magazine, "When I was 15 I was lucky enough to watch Mississippi Mermaid, the movie Truffaut made of the same book. It was not very good, but it produced an incredible impact on me. When I met Melanie [Griffith, his wife], I told her the story of the movie. Years later we saw it, and the movie I had in my mind was completely different! When Michael Cristofer came to me with the script, I said, 'Oh, my God, I've been searching for this my whole life.'"

Original Sin started filming in Mexico in February 2000 under the title Dancing in the Dark (apparently later changed to avoid confusion with Lars Von Trier's Dancer in the Dark, 2000). The location was only a few miles from where Banderas had filmed The Mask of Zorro (1998). Pedro Armend¿z Jr. was added to the cast due to regulations requiring a Mexican actor in any films shot in Mexico, not a problem considering his notable career of a hundred plus movies.

Original Sin was originally planned for a Fall 2000 release but that was pushed back to take advantage of better dates. In fact, between the time of Original Sin's filming and release, Banderas was able to make Spy Kids which opened to generally wide acclaim.

A remake of Planet of the Apes might not seem like an especially wonderful idea. What's next? Live-action Scooby Doo? An updated Charlie's Angels? OK, those examples actually exist but you get the point. Expectations about Planet changed, though, when the stylish mood-master Tim Burton signed aboard to direct and enlisted Mark Wahlberg, not only one of the most promising young actors around but somebody with real box-office appeal. Wahlberg will be playing an astronaut on a routine space journey who unexpectedly ends up on a world where intelligent apes rule servile humans.

TIM BURTON'S PLANET OF THE APES

The story behind this new version stretches all the way back to 1993 when the film first attracted interest as a possible remake. Oliver Stone was co-producing and Arnold Schwarzenegger was tentatively set to star with Philip Noyce (Patriot Games, 1982) directing. This delicate set-up soon collapsed. Over the remaining years there were a variety of people considered for the project: For director, Stone himself, James Cameron, Peter Jackson, Chris Columbus, Robert Rodriguez; For writer, Sam Hamm (Batman, 1989), Graham Yost (Speed, 1994); For stars, Ben Affleck, Ben Kingsley, Gary Oldman, Johnny Depp. These names come from reports in trade papers or reliable sources but with such constant change they may have been little more than temporary considerations.

The people who actually made the remake came together in Spring of 2000. That's when the chaos finally settled into Tim Burton directing and Mark Wahlberg starring with key roles of apes going to Helena Bonham Carter, Tim Roth and Michael Clarke Duncan. One unusual choice is Kris Kristofferson as a human rebel. (Oddly enough Wahlberg is doing another remake immediately after Planet, this time of Charade). Filming started last November and took place in L.A., Arizona, Australia and Hawaii. The budget is rumored to be in the $100 million range (as compared to $5 million for the original). Though the story's broad outline is known, the details have been kept tightly guarded with only comments that the film isn't so much a strict remake as a rethinking of the original series. And what about the famous ending of the original? Supposedly Burton and company have avoided that entirely and instead filmed six different endings to confuse any spies or leaks. Linda Harrison, who appeared in the first two original films in the series, says on her website that she's doing a cameo in the new one. There are also unconfirmed rumors of cameos by George Clooney and Spike Jonze (Wahlberg's co-stars in Three Kings and apparently real-life friends). We do know that you can spot Burton regulars Glenn Shadix and Lisa Marie.

You might be curious about Charlton Heston, star of the original film. Reports have been sometimes yes and sometimes no about whether he would appear in the remake, supposedly as an ape this time around. Heston apparently did a make up test and was only able to commit to one day's work. Still, he's not currently listed in the cast but who knows what surprises await?

ROLLERBALL REMAKE DELAYED TILL THE FALL

Due in theatres this fall (after being previously advertised as a summer release) is a hyped-up, 21st Century remake of Rollerball. The new version promises to take full advantage of special effects technology not available for the 1975 original, as well as some apparently fearless stuntmen. The $80 million film is directed by action specialist John McTiernan (Die Hard, Hunt for Red October) and oddly enough marks his second remake in a row of a film originally by Norman Jewison (after The Thomas Crown Affair). The story remains more or less the same: Chris Klein (in the James Caan role) is uncertain about his future until he hears from suddenly wealthy buddy L.L. Cool J about a new underground sport called Rollerball, a mix of roller derby, motorcycling and sheer mayhem. Klein joins Rollerball and soon becomes one of its biggest stars, only to discover that the corporate boss is much more interested in ratings than in their well-being. The remake will be packed with such familiar faces as model Rebecca Romijn-Stamos (The X-Men), Jean Reno (Mission: Impossible) and pop singer Pink. Bring your crash helmets.
Remake - The Deep End

Remake - The Deep End

THE RECKLESS MOMENT becomes THE DEEP END In 1947 Elizabeth Sanxay Holding wrote a novel entitled The Blank Wall which was adapted for the screen in 1949 as The Reckless Moment. Directed by Max Ophuls, the suspense thriller focused on Lucia Harper (Joan Bennett), a housewife who goes to desperate lengths to protect her daughter Bea from being arrested for a murder. But did she really commit one? Lucia definitely saw the body because she disposed of it without her daughter's knowledge. And her world is thrown into further turmoil by an unexpected visit from a blackmailer (James Mason) who has some incriminating love letters to sell. The Reckless Moment was well received in its day and features what many now believe is one of Joan Bennett's best performances. It is also highly regarded by fans of Max Ophuls. Yet, the film is not available currently on video, DVD, or laserdisc. So don't hold your breath waiting for the re-release anytime soon. However, an alternative is to go see The Deep End (2001), a new adaptation of Holding's original novel by the filmmaking team of Scott McGehee and David Siegel. While the central plot is basically the same as The Reckless Moment, the setting has been changed from a Southern California beachfront to Lake Tahoe and Bea, the suspect daughter in the original, has been transformed into Beau, a gay teenager who is running around with an untrustworthy older man. The Deep End enjoyed a flurry of early rave reviews from most of the mainstream critics but now that it is going into general release, we are seeing more mixed reactions from other viewers; some prefer the Max Ophuls 1949 version while others are finding some major plausibility problems with the behavior of Margaret Hall (Tilda Swinton), the gay teenager's mother. One thing everyone seems to agree on, however, is Tilda Swinton's tour-de-force performance as the frantic mother. Roger Ebert wrote, "She is always believable as this harassed, desperate, loving mother. She projects a kind of absorption in her task; she juggles blackmail, murder, bank loans, picking up the kids after school - it's as if the ordinary tasks keep her sane enough to deal with the dangers that surround her." Swinton has previously been seen in such offbeat indie efforts as Orlando (1992), The War Zone (1999) and Female Perversions (1996). Her most famous mainstream film to date is probably The Beach (2000) in which she played Sal, the manipulative commune member who has an affair with Leonardo DeCaprio. With a little luck, The Deep End should expose Swinton to a much wider audience. FROM A PULP NOVEL TO A FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT FILM TO A BRAND NEW REMAKE Depending on how you approach Original Sin it's either a new version of a classic pulp novel (Cornell Woolrich's Waltz Into Darkness) or the latest Hollywood remake of a foreign classic (Francois Truffaut's Mississippi Mermaid (1969). Either way it promises to be a smarter than usual psychological thriller with enough star power from Antonio Banderas and Angelina Jolie to constitute its own heat wave. The basic story remains much the same. In the 1880s a Cuban plantation owner (Banderas) meets a mysterious American woman (Jolie) who's answering his ad for a bride placed in a Baltimore newspaper. Though Banderas wants only a good, stable wife he is unexpectedly swept up in a raging passion. Still, there are a few unsettling signs that all is not what it appears to be. Jolie doesn't quite match the original description he'd received from the States plus she has some unexplained scars on her back (caused by husband Billy Bob Thornton?) and a trunk that is always locked. Original Sin was produced by Via Rosa, Michelle Pfeiffer's production company. Actually, Pfeiffer had originally planned to star in it before scheduling conflicts arose; she's still listed as producer. However, director-writer Michael Cristofer knew exactly who to put in the lead role: Angelina Jolie, who he had directed in her breakthrough film Gia (1998) (which won her Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild awards). Getting Banderas proved to be a lucky coincidence. As the actor told Out magazine, "When I was 15 I was lucky enough to watch Mississippi Mermaid, the movie Truffaut made of the same book. It was not very good, but it produced an incredible impact on me. When I met Melanie [Griffith, his wife], I told her the story of the movie. Years later we saw it, and the movie I had in my mind was completely different! When Michael Cristofer came to me with the script, I said, 'Oh, my God, I've been searching for this my whole life.'" Original Sin started filming in Mexico in February 2000 under the title Dancing in the Dark (apparently later changed to avoid confusion with Lars Von Trier's Dancer in the Dark, 2000). The location was only a few miles from where Banderas had filmed The Mask of Zorro (1998). Pedro Armend¿z Jr. was added to the cast due to regulations requiring a Mexican actor in any films shot in Mexico, not a problem considering his notable career of a hundred plus movies. Original Sin was originally planned for a Fall 2000 release but that was pushed back to take advantage of better dates. In fact, between the time of Original Sin's filming and release, Banderas was able to make Spy Kids which opened to generally wide acclaim. A remake of Planet of the Apes might not seem like an especially wonderful idea. What's next? Live-action Scooby Doo? An updated Charlie's Angels? OK, those examples actually exist but you get the point. Expectations about Planet changed, though, when the stylish mood-master Tim Burton signed aboard to direct and enlisted Mark Wahlberg, not only one of the most promising young actors around but somebody with real box-office appeal. Wahlberg will be playing an astronaut on a routine space journey who unexpectedly ends up on a world where intelligent apes rule servile humans. TIM BURTON'S PLANET OF THE APES The story behind this new version stretches all the way back to 1993 when the film first attracted interest as a possible remake. Oliver Stone was co-producing and Arnold Schwarzenegger was tentatively set to star with Philip Noyce (Patriot Games, 1982) directing. This delicate set-up soon collapsed. Over the remaining years there were a variety of people considered for the project: For director, Stone himself, James Cameron, Peter Jackson, Chris Columbus, Robert Rodriguez; For writer, Sam Hamm (Batman, 1989), Graham Yost (Speed, 1994); For stars, Ben Affleck, Ben Kingsley, Gary Oldman, Johnny Depp. These names come from reports in trade papers or reliable sources but with such constant change they may have been little more than temporary considerations. The people who actually made the remake came together in Spring of 2000. That's when the chaos finally settled into Tim Burton directing and Mark Wahlberg starring with key roles of apes going to Helena Bonham Carter, Tim Roth and Michael Clarke Duncan. One unusual choice is Kris Kristofferson as a human rebel. (Oddly enough Wahlberg is doing another remake immediately after Planet, this time of Charade). Filming started last November and took place in L.A., Arizona, Australia and Hawaii. The budget is rumored to be in the $100 million range (as compared to $5 million for the original). Though the story's broad outline is known, the details have been kept tightly guarded with only comments that the film isn't so much a strict remake as a rethinking of the original series. And what about the famous ending of the original? Supposedly Burton and company have avoided that entirely and instead filmed six different endings to confuse any spies or leaks. Linda Harrison, who appeared in the first two original films in the series, says on her website that she's doing a cameo in the new one. There are also unconfirmed rumors of cameos by George Clooney and Spike Jonze (Wahlberg's co-stars in Three Kings and apparently real-life friends). We do know that you can spot Burton regulars Glenn Shadix and Lisa Marie. You might be curious about Charlton Heston, star of the original film. Reports have been sometimes yes and sometimes no about whether he would appear in the remake, supposedly as an ape this time around. Heston apparently did a make up test and was only able to commit to one day's work. Still, he's not currently listed in the cast but who knows what surprises await? ROLLERBALL REMAKE DELAYED TILL THE FALL Due in theatres this fall (after being previously advertised as a summer release) is a hyped-up, 21st Century remake of Rollerball. The new version promises to take full advantage of special effects technology not available for the 1975 original, as well as some apparently fearless stuntmen. The $80 million film is directed by action specialist John McTiernan (Die Hard, Hunt for Red October) and oddly enough marks his second remake in a row of a film originally by Norman Jewison (after The Thomas Crown Affair). The story remains more or less the same: Chris Klein (in the James Caan role) is uncertain about his future until he hears from suddenly wealthy buddy L.L. Cool J about a new underground sport called Rollerball, a mix of roller derby, motorcycling and sheer mayhem. Klein joins Rollerball and soon becomes one of its biggest stars, only to discover that the corporate boss is much more interested in ratings than in their well-being. The remake will be packed with such familiar faces as model Rebecca Romijn-Stamos (The X-Men), Jean Reno (Mission: Impossible) and pop singer Pink. Bring your crash helmets.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the Excellence in Cinematography Award - Drama at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival.

Limited Release in United States August 8, 2001

Released in United States Summer August 8, 2001

Expanded Release in United States August 15, 2001

Released in United States on Video April 16, 2002

Released in United States 2001

Released in United States January 2001

Released in United States August 2001

Shown at Deauville Festival of American Film (in competition) August 31 - September 9, 2001.

Shown at Edinburgh International Film Festival (Gala) August 12-26, 2001.

Elizabeth Sanxay Holding's 1947 novel "The Blank Wall" was previously adapted for director Max Ophuls' "The Reckless Moment" (USA/1949) starring James Mason and Joan Bennett.

Fox Searchlight acquired domestic distribution rights at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival for a reported $4 million.

Completed shooting July 2000.

Began shooting June 25, 2000.

Limited Release in United States August 8, 2001

Released in United States Summer August 8, 2001

Expanded Release in United States August 15, 2001

Released in United States on Video April 16, 2002

Released in United States 2001 (Shown at Deauville Festival of American Film (in competition) August 31 - September 9, 2001.)

Released in United States January 2001 (Shown at Sundance Film Festival (Dramatic Competition) in Park City, Utah January 18-28, 2001.)

Released in United States August 2001 (Shown at Edinburgh International Film Festival (Gala) August 12-26, 2001.)