The Center of the World


1h 26m 2001

Brief Synopsis

Millionare Richard Longman is a San Francisco computer wizard in his early twenties whose immersion in the world of computers has left him unaccustomed to the world outside his door. With the recent loss of his father and his growing disinterest in the all-consuming pursuit of IPO glory, Richard has

Film Details

Also Known As
Center of the World, Centre du monde, Le, Centre of the World, The, Le Centre du monde
MPAA Rating
NR
Genre
Drama
Release Date
2001
Distribution Company
Artisan Entertainment
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m

Synopsis

Millionare Richard Longman is a San Francisco computer wizard in his early twenties whose immersion in the world of computers has left him unaccustomed to the world outside his door. With the recent loss of his father and his growing disinterest in the all-consuming pursuit of IPO glory, Richard has retreated further into his technological cocoon. But his computer cannot bring him what he hungers for most: the warmth of sustained human connection. Florence is a smart drummer in a loud, thrashy rock band, but to pay her bills she works as a stripper at an upscale club called Pandora's Box. In her own mind, the line between her real self, including her real sensuality, and her professional persona is crystal clear; however that division has not yet been put to the test. They meet in a coffee shop. Immediately attracted to each other, the two soon take off for Las Vegas, where, for three days, they explore the limits of their sexuality and the nature of passion and pleasure.

Crew

Deva Anderson

Music Supervisor

Lesley Anderson

Hair Stylist

David Anthony

Casting

Robin Antin

Other

Joseph Augustine

Craft Service

Paul Auster

From Story

Paul Auster

Story By

Randall Balsmeyer

Other

Scott Barnes

Best Boy

Janeane Barry

Animal Services

Michael Bauman

Gaffer

Jim Beam

Other

Kingsuk Biswas

Song Performer

Kingsuk Biswas

Song

Robert Blomstrom

Set Production Assistant

Rory Brosnan

Other

Leah Buono

Casting Associate

Donald Graham Burt

Production Designer

Jason Mccabe Calacanis

Executive Consultant

Sophie Carbonell

Costume Designer

Amy Carroll

Office Assistant

Steven Carter

Song

Kam Chan

Foley Editor

Richard Checinski

Best Boy Grip

Sue Chipperton

Animal Services

Marko Costanzo

Foley Artist

Bryan Cotton

Graphics

Richard Crompton

Dolly Grip

Ira Deutchman

Executive Producer

Marius Devries

Song

David B Diamond

Boom Operator

Curtis Drake

Rerecording

Beco Dranoff

Song

Cameron Ember

Song Performer

Cameron Ember

Song

Leann Emmert

Location Assistant

Gabi Endicott

Script Supervisor

Ignatius Evans

Other

Sean Fairburn

Camera Operator

Carolyn Fernandez

Art Department

Margaret Fiedler

Song

Mauro Fiore

Dp/Cinematographer

Mauro Fiore

Director Of Photography

Guy Fixen

Song

Pamela Flowers

Music

Wayne Fujita

Graphics

Sean Garnhart

Music Editor

Sean Garnhart

Rerecording

Sean Garnhart

Sound Editor

Albert Gasser

Dialogue Editor

Michelle Gebert

Post-Production Accountant

John Gheur

Graphics

Bebel Gilberto

Song

Bebel Gilberto

Song Performer

Tim Gordine

Song

Yossi Govrin

Art Department

Francey Grace

Coproducer

Todd Griffith

Key Grip

Larry Gross

Consultant

Nancy Haecker

Location Manager

Brigitte Haelg

Graphic Designer

Eric Heavens

Visual Effects

Joe Henry

Song

Joe Henry

Song Performer

Lora Hingst

Set Production Assistant

Bob Holroyd

Song

Bob Holroyd

Song Performer

Ryan Hunt

Graphics

Siri Hustvedt

From Story

Siri Hustvedt

Story By

Greg Johnson

Executive Producer

John P Johnson

Photography

Kimberly Johnson

Costumes

Miranda July

Story By

Miranda July

From Story

Gordon K Kee

Accountant

Kathy Kelehan

Visual Effects

Frank Kern

Foley Editor

Ashley Kimmet

Electrician

Alisha Klass

Consultant

Thomas Krempke

Other

Diana Kunce

Art Director

George Lara

Foley Mixer

Adria Later

Other

Paul Le Blanc

Hair Stylist

Paul Leblanc

Hair Stylist

Martin Levenstein

Associate Editor

Heidi Levitt

Casting

Heidi Levitt

Coproducer

Skip Lievsay

Rerecording

Patrick Lindenmaier

Color

Patrick Lindenmaier

Color Correction

Geof Lipman

Consultant

Andrew Loo

Unit Production Manager

Andrew Loo

Coproducer

Nicole Love

Song Performer

Nicole Love

Song

Steven Maines

Stand-In

Gustavo Marcus

Other

Kara Maria

Art Department

Toby Marks

Song

Jose Manuel Martinez

Song

Jonathan Mcgarry

Assistant Director

Pia Mehr

Other

Yael Melamede

Post-Production Supervisor

Lydia Milars

Makeup Artist

Gray Miller

Visual Effects

Lauren Moore

Stand-In

Michael Moore

Graphics

Aly Morita

Assistant

Peter Newman

Producer

Kris Nicolau

Casting

Mike Nine

Other

M Michele Nishikawa

Production Coordinator

Annalise Ophelian

Consultant

Piero Ornelas

Song

Bill Orrico

Assistant Sound Editor

James Leland Parker

Swing Gang

Elizabeth Paulson

Casting Associate

Lee Percy

Editor

Monica Carey Persons

Assistant Camera Operator

Michael Petras

Research And Content Consultant

Keith Potter

Set Production Assistant

Carlos Quinteros

Electrician

Ken Ramm

Song

Othar Richey

Set Production Assistant

Jaime Robbie Robertson

Song Performer

Jaime Robbie Robertson

Song

Bill Rodenbaugh

Accounting Assistant

Heinz Rohrer

Editing

Laurel Rosen

Research And Content Consultant

Nicolas Roussiau

Other

Michael Ryan

Graphics

Dj Cheb I Sabbah

Song Performer

Dj Cheb I Sabbah

Song

Dan Schmit

Visual Effects Supervisor

Paul Schmitz

Assistant Director

Dan Schwarz

Other

Amit Sethi

Animator

Eli Shamszadeh

Graphics

Misako Shimizu

Assistant Editor

Wayne T Silva

Office Assistant

Lydia Simon

Set Decorator

James Stuebe

Sound Mixer

Janine Sugawara

Research And Content Consultant

Taj Tedrow

Graphics

Julie Tong

Other

Javier Torres

Property Master

Jay Traynor

Location Manager

Ruedi Tresch

Color

Scott Trotsky

Other

Ryan Tyler

Assistant Production Coordinator

Randal Vegter

Other

Erik Ian Walker

Song Performer

Erik Ian Walker

Song

Wayne Wang

From Story

Wayne Wang

Story By

Wayne Wang

Producer

Byron Wong

Song

Ellen Benjamin Wong

Screenplay

Fei Wong

Set Production Assistant

Film Details

Also Known As
Center of the World, Centre du monde, Le, Centre of the World, The, Le Centre du monde
MPAA Rating
NR
Genre
Drama
Release Date
2001
Distribution Company
Artisan Entertainment
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m

Articles

Pat Morita (1932-2005)


Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73.

He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor.

His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy.

He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles.

Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype.

However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality.

He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities.

He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73. He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy. He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles. Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype. However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality. He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities. He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Expanded Release in United States May 4, 2001

Released in United States 2001

Released in United States April 20, 2001

Released in United States May 2001

Released in United States on Video December 18, 2001

Released in United States Spring April 18, 2001

Shown at Cannes International Film Festival (out of competition) May 9-20, 2001.

Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival April 19 - May 3, 2001.

The film's final screenplay was the result of many contributors' work, including internet entepreneurs, sex industry workers, other writers, the actors, as well as Paul Auster, Siri Hustvedt, Miranda July and director Wayne Wang. To accurately reflect such wide and varying sources, the screenplay credit was assigned to a pseudonym, Ellen Benjamin Wong.

Began shooting March 22, 2000.

Completed shooting April 21, 2000.

Released in United States 2001 (Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival April 19 - May 3, 2001.)

Released in United States Spring April 18, 2001 (NY, LA)

Released in United States April 20, 2001 (Los Angeles and San Francisco)

Released in United States May 2001 (Shown at Cannes International Film Festival (out of competition) May 9-20, 2001.)

Expanded Release in United States May 4, 2001

Released in United States on Video December 18, 2001