O


1h 31m 2001

Brief Synopsis

Deep in the American South, NBA hopeful Odin James is the only black student at an elite private school. Playing point guard, Odin is a basketball scout's dream, possessing the talent to go straight from high school to the pros. Odin not only enjoys widespread popularity with the students, he is dat

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
2001
Distribution Company
Lionsgate
Location
Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m

Synopsis

Deep in the American South, NBA hopeful Odin James is the only black student at an elite private school. Playing point guard, Odin is a basketball scout's dream, possessing the talent to go straight from high school to the pros. Odin not only enjoys widespread popularity with the students, he is dating the beautiful Desi Brable, daughter of Dean Brable. Odin's best friend, Hugo Goulding, is a starting forward on the basketball team and the son of Coach Duke Goulding. Hugo is bitterly envious of Odin and the attention he receives from the coach and everyone else. Placed in the role of Odin's confidante, Hugo is, in reality, seeking to destroy his friend. Striking at the very core of Odin's soul, Hugo convinces him that Desi is having an affair with another member of the basketball team, Michael Casio. As the basketball season comes to a dramatic finish, conflict among the friends escalates into irrevocable tragedy when Hugo executes a plan prompting Odin to throw away all he cares about most.

Crew

Jared Abrams

Assistant Camera Operator

Norman Adelshugel

Other

Elizabeth Albert

Other

Bill Allanson

Other

Michael Axinn

Assistant Sound Editor

Janet Baker

Production Assistant

Susie Balaban

Assistant Director

Jack Ballance

Art Director

Beverly Ballzigler

Assistant

Jennifer Barin

Other

Bob Basha

Photography

Judi Bell

Craft Service

Phil Benson

Sound Editor

Louis Bernard

Other

Sean Bernard

Other

Ray Bivins

Special Effects Coordinator

Sonia Bland

Assistant Camera Operator

Michella Botticelli

Assistant Editor

Beth Bowling

Assistant

Karen A Brocco

Assistant Sound Editor

Shane Brooks

Grip

David Brown

Driver

Ron Brown

Driver

Marilyn Buist

Other

Christie Chaplin

Other

Amy Chason

Craft Service

Tim Cohn

Assistant Property Master

Barry Cole

Music Supervisor

Richard Cole

Grip

Jeff Couch

Transportation Captain

Betsy Danbury

Unit Production Manager

Betsy Danbury

Coproducer

Betsy Danbury

Line Producer

Jeff Danna

Music

Jeff Danna

Music Producer

Vanessa Davis

Hair Assistant

Fred Denardo

Accountant

Rich Dipalma

Accountant

Jennifer Diquollo

Production Assistant

Lisa Diquollo

Craft Service

Steve Dougherty

Other

Abigail Drury

Other

David Duren

Rigging Gaffer

Tony Eckert

Foley Mixer

Greg Eddins

Other

Jonathan Edmonds

Production Assistant

Jenny Elsinger

Other

Zack Estrin

Associate Producer

Randy Falcon

Assistant Camera Operator

Russell Fine

Director Of Photography

Aj Forester

Transportation Coordinator

Suzanne Fox

Adr Editor

Tim Fox

Swing Gang

Daniel Fried

Producer

Richard Futch

Local Casting

Abigail Gabbard

Office Assistant

Jeffery Gallant

Production Assistant

Jillian Gallant

Office Assistant

Ashleigh Gerl

Other

Jack Gilchrist

Best Boy Grip

Peter Girolami

Gaffer

Eric Gitter

Producer

Lisa Gitter

Coproducer

Patricia M Glasser

Hair

Joe Goins

Special Effects Assistant

Vara Golakova

Production Supervisor

Ben Gold

Assistant Editor

Dina Goldman

Production Designer

Angelo Gonzales

Accountant

Fredric B Goodman

Co-Executive Producer

Dwayne Grace

Advisor

Nadine Hadera

Assistant Costume Designer

Brad Haehnel

Sound Mixer

Jimmy Hanna

Caterer

Fred Heming

Other

Perry Hickman

Driver

Richard Lee Hill

Grip

Charles Thomas Hinson

Dolly Grip

Joanne Hinson

Production Assistant

Kevin Hinson

Set Production Assistant

Lora Hirschberg

Rerecording

Cindi Hobgood

Assistant Location Manager

G Heath Hood

Props

Hillary Howard

Other

Laurel Hughes

Assistant Camera Operator

Nancy Jacklyn

Office Assistant

Tony Jenzano

Video Assist/Playback

Cal Johnson

Stunt Coordinator

Dan Jones

Camera

Larry Jones

Location Assistant

Brad Kaaya

Associate Producer

Brad Kaaya

Screenplay

Avy Kaufman

Casting

Stephen Kearney

Sound Effects Editor

Stephen Kepniss

Co-Executive Producer

Kay Kilmer

Stunt Man

Robin Knight

Stand-In

Taylor Knight

Hair Stylist

Christopher Kuder

Props

Preston Lancaster

Location Assistant

Robert Langhorst

Other

Bryan Lee

Electrician

Linda Lee

Location Manager

Donald Lenear

Grip

Michael I. Levy

Executive Producer

Dale Liner

Other

Andrew Lockington

Original Music

Skip Long

Driver

Malcolm Macintosh

Camera Operator

Michael S Martin

Props

Jay Mason

Script Supervisor

Dawn Massaro

Assistant Director

Dorothy Masters

Set Costumer

Robert K Maxfield

Sound Mixer

Dave Mcanany

Driver

Ronda Mccall

Production Assistant

Mark Mcinville

Driver

Tina Mckissick

Stunt Man

Lisa Mercurio

Set Production Assistant

Frank 'pepe' Merel

Foley Recordist

Stephen Mills

Grip

Zachary Moody

Production Assistant

Walker Moore

Driver

Matt Morris

Location Assistant

Claudia Moser

Makeup

Margaret Mullins

Local Casting

Jack Munn

Medic

Tom Myers

Sound Designer

Tom Myers

Rerecording

John M Nelson

Production Assistant

Leslie Nicholson

Other

Jan Nizen

Production Accountant

Jonathan Null

Dialogue Editor

Robert Nute

Production Assistant

Ed O'bryant

Best Boy

E Larry Oatfield

Foley Editor

David Oberholtzer

Caterer

Jill Ohanneson

Costume Designer

Bill Onions

Accountant

Terry Owens

Driver

Harry Palmer

Electrician

James J. Passanante

Construction Coordinator

Walter Pendergrass

Production Assistant

John Perkinson

Camera Operator

Teresa Phelps

Art Department Coordinator

Tarah Phillipppi

Other

Michael Piotrowski

Boom Operator

Stephanie Ponder

Makeup Assistant

Leslie Reed

Production Assistant

John David Reynolds

Other

Anthony Rhulen

Producer

Gary A. Rizzo

Rerecording

William Rutherford

Other

Kate Sanford

Editor

Larry Sauls

On-Set Dresser

David Schlesinger

Set Decorator

Charles Seabrook

Key Grip

Tim Seegers

Animal Wrangler

Renannah Seliger

Apprentice

William Shakespeare

Play As Source Material

Andrew Shealy

Office Assistant

William Shively

Executive Producer

Robert Shoup

Adr Editor

Ellie Simmons

Location Assistant

Paul A Simmons

Costume Supervisor

Rob Simpson

Driver

Tim Sineath

Props

Steve Slanec

Assistant Sound Editor

Lesa Smalls

Other

Elisa Smith

Other

Anna Snow

Set Production Assistant

Donald Spann

Production Assistant

M Richard Speranza

Dolly Grip

Jonas Steadman

Assistant Camera

Erich Stratmann

Assistant Sound Editor

Rebecca Swender

Apprentice

Dan Taylor

Assistant Camera Operator

James Thomas

Accounting Assistant

Dennie Thorpe

Foley Artist

Tom Tucker

Assistant Director

Tom Tucker

Associate Producer

Daniel Turek

Assistant Camera Operator

Russell Van Boven

Video Assist/Playback

Jana Vance

Foley Artist

Cory Vletor

Post-Production Coordinator

Cory Vletor

Assistant

Katherine Waggoner

Other

Mike Washington

Stand-In

Laura Weinberg

Apprentice

Virginia Wilkins

Production Assistant

Mark Jan Wlodarkiewicz

Music Editor

Sean Worrell

Production Assistant

Robert D Wright

Driver

Steve Yetman

Swing Gang

J Mark Young

Electrician

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
2001
Distribution Company
Lionsgate
Location
Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m

Articles

Remake - 'O'


A HIGH SCHOOL OTHELLO?

Othello, Shakespeare's classic play about jealousy adapted from a story by Italian writer Giambattista Giraldi, is back on movie screens in the form of O this time set in a modern-day high school. The new version has gathered mostly positive reviews even considering the long and illustrious history of Othello in its many versions. The play first hit screens twice in 1907, once as an Italian film directed by and starring Mario Caserini, the other a German film from Franz Porten who also directed and starred. There were five more versions during the silent era, mostly again from Germany or Italy. A 1922 German adaptation with Emil Jannings can be found on DVD along with a bonus 1911 Danish variation called Desdemona.

The first sound version appeared in 1946 with Iago played by Sebastian Cabot (later to be Mr. French on TV's Family Affair). Running only 45 minutes this version must have been little more than a collection of highlights. Perhaps the best film of Othello resulted when lifelong Shakespearean Orson Welles finally completed his version in 1952. Shot on a tiny budget whenever time allowed over a period of three years, Welles' Othello is a triumph of imagination and artistry. Critic Jonathan Rosenbaum says this "may well be the greatest of all Shakespeare films" and certainly will fascinate people not particularly interested in Shakespeare. Like most Welles films it exists in multiple versions; the one currently available on DVD is perhaps the most complete but since it has a rerecorded score and some original dialogue recently overdubbed by fill-in actors it's basically just another version not a full restoration.

There were some TV remakes and a couple of Russian versions before the next big Othello film appeared when Laurence Olivier took the title role in 1965. (He had earlier played Iago on stage during the 1930s.) Olivier surrounded himself with such top-notch actors as Maggie Smith, Frank Finlay and Joyce Redman, all four of whom received Oscar nominations for their work in this film. Olivier's version actually started on the stage in London and much of the film is apparently a fairly direct translation, even using some of the same set designs. It received rave reviews when released, further cementing Olivier's reputation.

Othello has continued to attract actors since then. In 1979 Richard Dreyfuss and Raul Julia filmed it, Anthony Hopkins and Bob Hoskins did in 1981 and then Laurence Fishburne with Irene Jacob and Kenneth Branagh in 1995 . There was even a 1997 adaptation from India. It seems unlikely that these will be the last.

By Lang Thompson

THE RECKLESS MOMENT becomes THE DEEP END

In 1947 Elizabeth Sanxay Holding wrote a novel entitled The Blank Wall which was adapted for the screen in 1949 as The Reckless Moment. Directed by Max Ophuls, the suspense thriller focused on Lucia Harper (Joan Bennett), a housewife who goes to desperate lengths to protect her daughter Bea from being arrested for a murder. But did she really commit one? Lucia definitely saw the body because she disposed of it without her daughter's knowledge. And her world is thrown into further turmoil by an unexpected visit from a blackmailer (James Mason) who has some incriminating love letters to sell. The Reckless Moment was well received in its day and features what many now believe is one of Joan Bennett's best performances. It is also highly regarded by fans of Max Ophuls. Yet, the film is not available currently on video, DVD, or laserdisc.

So don't hold your breath waiting for the re-release anytime soon. However, an alternative is to go see The Deep End (2001), a new adaptation of Holding's original novel by the filmmaking team of Scott McGehee and David Siegel. While the central plot is basically the same as The Reckless Moment, the setting has been changed from a Southern California beachfront to Lake Tahoe and Bea, the suspect daughter in the original, has been transformed into Beau, a gay teenager who is running around with an untrustworthy older man. The Deep End enjoyed a flurry of early rave reviews from most of the mainstream critics but now that it is going into general release, we are seeing more mixed reactions from other viewers; some prefer the Max Ophuls 1949 version while others are finding some major plausibility problems with the behavior of Margaret Hall (Tilda Swinton), the gay teenager's mother. One thing everyone seems to agree on, however, is Tilda Swinton's tour-de-force performance as the frantic mother. Roger Ebert wrote, "She is always believable as this harassed, desperate, loving mother. She projects a kind of absorption in her task; she juggles blackmail, murder, bank loans, picking up the kids after school - it's as if the ordinary tasks keep her sane enough to deal with the dangers that surround her." Swinton has previously been seen in such offbeat indie efforts as Orlando (1992), The War Zone (1999) and Female Perversions (1996). Her most famous mainstream film to date is probably The Beach (2000) in which she played Sal, the manipulative commune member who has an affair with Leonardo DeCaprio. With a little luck, The Deep End should expose Swinton to a much wider audience.

FROM A PULP NOVEL TO A FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT FILM TO A BRAND NEW REMAKE

Depending on how you approach Original Sin it's either a new version of a classic pulp novel (Cornell Woolrich's Waltz Into Darkness) or the latest Hollywood remake of a foreign classic (Francois Truffaut's Mississippi Mermaid (1969). Either way it promises to be a smarter than usual psychological thriller with enough star power from Antonio Banderas and Angelina Jolie to constitute its own heat wave.

The basic story remains much the same. In the 1880s a Cuban plantation owner (Banderas) meets a mysterious American woman (Jolie) who's answering his ad for a bride placed in a Baltimore newspaper. Though Banderas wants only a good, stable wife he is unexpectedly swept up in a raging passion. Still, there are a few unsettling signs that all is not what it appears to be. Jolie doesn't quite match the original description he'd received from the States plus she has some unexplained scars on her back (caused by husband Billy Bob Thornton?) and a trunk that is always locked.

Original Sin was produced by Via Rosa, Michelle Pfeiffer's production company. Actually, Pfeiffer had originally planned to star in it before scheduling conflicts arose; she's still listed as producer. However, director-writer Michael Cristofer knew exactly who to put in the lead role: Angelina Jolie, who he had directed in her breakthrough film Gia (1998) (which won her Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild awards).

Getting Banderas proved to be a lucky coincidence. As the actor told Out magazine, "When I was 15 I was lucky enough to watch Mississippi Mermaid, the movie Truffaut made of the same book. It was not very good, but it produced an incredible impact on me. When I met Melanie [Griffith, his wife], I told her the story of the movie. Years later we saw it, and the movie I had in my mind was completely different! When Michael Cristofer came to me with the script, I said, 'Oh, my God, I've been searching for this my whole life.'"

Original Sin started filming in Mexico in February 2000 under the title Dancing in the Dark (apparently later changed to avoid confusion with Lars Von Trier's Dancer in the Dark, 2000). The location was only a few miles from where Banderas had filmed The Mask of Zorro (1998). Pedro Armend¿z Jr. was added to the cast due to regulations requiring a Mexican actor in any films shot in Mexico, not a problem considering his notable career of a hundred plus movies.

Original Sin was originally planned for a Fall 2000 release but that was pushed back to take advantage of better dates. In fact, between the time of Original Sin's filming and release, Banderas was able to make Spy Kids which opened to generally wide acclaim.

A remake of Planet of the Apes might not seem like an especially wonderful idea. What's next? Live-action Scooby Doo? An updated Charlie's Angels? OK, those examples actually exist but you get the point. Expectations about Planet changed, though, when the stylish mood-master Tim Burton signed aboard to direct and enlisted Mark Wahlberg, not only one of the most promising young actors around but somebody with real box-office appeal. Wahlberg will be playing an astronaut on a routine space journey who unexpectedly ends up on a world where intelligent apes rule servile humans.

TIM BURTON'S PLANET OF THE APES

The story behind this new version stretches all the way back to 1993 when the film first attracted interest as a possible remake. Oliver Stone was co-producing and Arnold Schwarzenegger was tentatively set to star with Philip Noyce (Patriot Games, 1982) directing. This delicate set-up soon collapsed. Over the remaining years there were a variety of people considered for the project: For director, Stone himself, James Cameron, Peter Jackson, Chris Columbus, Robert Rodriguez; For writer, Sam Hamm (Batman, 1989), Graham Yost (Speed, 1994); For stars, Ben Affleck, Ben Kingsley, Gary Oldman, Johnny Depp. These names come from reports in trade papers or reliable sources but with such constant change they may have been little more than temporary considerations.

The people who actually made the remake came together in Spring of 2000. That's when the chaos finally settled into Tim Burton directing and Mark Wahlberg starring with key roles of apes going to Helena Bonham Carter, Tim Roth and Michael Clarke Duncan. One unusual choice is Kris Kristofferson as a human rebel. (Oddly enough Wahlberg is doing another remake immediately after Planet, this time of Charade). Filming started last November and took place in L.A., Arizona, Australia and Hawaii. The budget is rumored to be in the $100 million range (as compared to $5 million for the original). Though the story's broad outline is known, the details have been kept tightly guarded with only comments that the film isn't so much a strict remake as a rethinking of the original series. And what about the famous ending of the original? Supposedly Burton and company have avoided that entirely and instead filmed six different endings to confuse any spies or leaks. Linda Harrison, who appeared in the first two original films in the series, says on her website that she's doing a cameo in the new one. There are also unconfirmed rumors of cameos by George Clooney and Spike Jonze (Wahlberg's co-stars in Three Kings and apparently real-life friends). We do know that you can spot Burton regulars Glenn Shadix and Lisa Marie.

You might be curious about Charlton Heston, star of the original film. Reports have been sometimes yes and sometimes no about whether he would appear in the remake, supposedly as an ape this time around. Heston apparently did a make up test and was only able to commit to one day's work. Still, he's not currently listed in the cast but who knows what surprises await?

ROLLERBALL REMAKE DELAYED TILL THE FALL

Due in theatres this fall (after being previously advertised as a summer release) is a hyped-up, 21st Century remake of Rollerball. The new version promises to take full advantage of special effects technology not available for the 1975 original, as well as some apparently fearless stuntmen. The $80 million film is directed by action specialist John McTiernan (Die Hard, Hunt for Red October) and oddly enough marks his second remake in a row of a film originally by Norman Jewison (after The Thomas Crown Affair). The story remains more or less the same: Chris Klein (in the James Caan role) is uncertain about his future until he hears from suddenly wealthy buddy L.L. Cool J about a new underground sport called Rollerball, a mix of roller derby, motorcycling and sheer mayhem. Klein joins Rollerball and soon becomes one of its biggest stars, only to discover that the corporate boss is much more interested in ratings than in their well-being. The remake will be packed with such familiar faces as model Rebecca Romijn-Stamos (The X-Men), Jean Reno (Mission: Impossible) and pop singer Pink. Bring your crash helmets.

Remake - 'o'

Remake - 'O'

A HIGH SCHOOL OTHELLO? Othello, Shakespeare's classic play about jealousy adapted from a story by Italian writer Giambattista Giraldi, is back on movie screens in the form of O this time set in a modern-day high school. The new version has gathered mostly positive reviews even considering the long and illustrious history of Othello in its many versions. The play first hit screens twice in 1907, once as an Italian film directed by and starring Mario Caserini, the other a German film from Franz Porten who also directed and starred. There were five more versions during the silent era, mostly again from Germany or Italy. A 1922 German adaptation with Emil Jannings can be found on DVD along with a bonus 1911 Danish variation called Desdemona. The first sound version appeared in 1946 with Iago played by Sebastian Cabot (later to be Mr. French on TV's Family Affair). Running only 45 minutes this version must have been little more than a collection of highlights. Perhaps the best film of Othello resulted when lifelong Shakespearean Orson Welles finally completed his version in 1952. Shot on a tiny budget whenever time allowed over a period of three years, Welles' Othello is a triumph of imagination and artistry. Critic Jonathan Rosenbaum says this "may well be the greatest of all Shakespeare films" and certainly will fascinate people not particularly interested in Shakespeare. Like most Welles films it exists in multiple versions; the one currently available on DVD is perhaps the most complete but since it has a rerecorded score and some original dialogue recently overdubbed by fill-in actors it's basically just another version not a full restoration. There were some TV remakes and a couple of Russian versions before the next big Othello film appeared when Laurence Olivier took the title role in 1965. (He had earlier played Iago on stage during the 1930s.) Olivier surrounded himself with such top-notch actors as Maggie Smith, Frank Finlay and Joyce Redman, all four of whom received Oscar nominations for their work in this film. Olivier's version actually started on the stage in London and much of the film is apparently a fairly direct translation, even using some of the same set designs. It received rave reviews when released, further cementing Olivier's reputation. Othello has continued to attract actors since then. In 1979 Richard Dreyfuss and Raul Julia filmed it, Anthony Hopkins and Bob Hoskins did in 1981 and then Laurence Fishburne with Irene Jacob and Kenneth Branagh in 1995 . There was even a 1997 adaptation from India. It seems unlikely that these will be the last. By Lang Thompson THE RECKLESS MOMENT becomes THE DEEP END In 1947 Elizabeth Sanxay Holding wrote a novel entitled The Blank Wall which was adapted for the screen in 1949 as The Reckless Moment. Directed by Max Ophuls, the suspense thriller focused on Lucia Harper (Joan Bennett), a housewife who goes to desperate lengths to protect her daughter Bea from being arrested for a murder. But did she really commit one? Lucia definitely saw the body because she disposed of it without her daughter's knowledge. And her world is thrown into further turmoil by an unexpected visit from a blackmailer (James Mason) who has some incriminating love letters to sell. The Reckless Moment was well received in its day and features what many now believe is one of Joan Bennett's best performances. It is also highly regarded by fans of Max Ophuls. Yet, the film is not available currently on video, DVD, or laserdisc. So don't hold your breath waiting for the re-release anytime soon. However, an alternative is to go see The Deep End (2001), a new adaptation of Holding's original novel by the filmmaking team of Scott McGehee and David Siegel. While the central plot is basically the same as The Reckless Moment, the setting has been changed from a Southern California beachfront to Lake Tahoe and Bea, the suspect daughter in the original, has been transformed into Beau, a gay teenager who is running around with an untrustworthy older man. The Deep End enjoyed a flurry of early rave reviews from most of the mainstream critics but now that it is going into general release, we are seeing more mixed reactions from other viewers; some prefer the Max Ophuls 1949 version while others are finding some major plausibility problems with the behavior of Margaret Hall (Tilda Swinton), the gay teenager's mother. One thing everyone seems to agree on, however, is Tilda Swinton's tour-de-force performance as the frantic mother. Roger Ebert wrote, "She is always believable as this harassed, desperate, loving mother. She projects a kind of absorption in her task; she juggles blackmail, murder, bank loans, picking up the kids after school - it's as if the ordinary tasks keep her sane enough to deal with the dangers that surround her." Swinton has previously been seen in such offbeat indie efforts as Orlando (1992), The War Zone (1999) and Female Perversions (1996). Her most famous mainstream film to date is probably The Beach (2000) in which she played Sal, the manipulative commune member who has an affair with Leonardo DeCaprio. With a little luck, The Deep End should expose Swinton to a much wider audience. FROM A PULP NOVEL TO A FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT FILM TO A BRAND NEW REMAKE Depending on how you approach Original Sin it's either a new version of a classic pulp novel (Cornell Woolrich's Waltz Into Darkness) or the latest Hollywood remake of a foreign classic (Francois Truffaut's Mississippi Mermaid (1969). Either way it promises to be a smarter than usual psychological thriller with enough star power from Antonio Banderas and Angelina Jolie to constitute its own heat wave. The basic story remains much the same. In the 1880s a Cuban plantation owner (Banderas) meets a mysterious American woman (Jolie) who's answering his ad for a bride placed in a Baltimore newspaper. Though Banderas wants only a good, stable wife he is unexpectedly swept up in a raging passion. Still, there are a few unsettling signs that all is not what it appears to be. Jolie doesn't quite match the original description he'd received from the States plus she has some unexplained scars on her back (caused by husband Billy Bob Thornton?) and a trunk that is always locked. Original Sin was produced by Via Rosa, Michelle Pfeiffer's production company. Actually, Pfeiffer had originally planned to star in it before scheduling conflicts arose; she's still listed as producer. However, director-writer Michael Cristofer knew exactly who to put in the lead role: Angelina Jolie, who he had directed in her breakthrough film Gia (1998) (which won her Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild awards). Getting Banderas proved to be a lucky coincidence. As the actor told Out magazine, "When I was 15 I was lucky enough to watch Mississippi Mermaid, the movie Truffaut made of the same book. It was not very good, but it produced an incredible impact on me. When I met Melanie [Griffith, his wife], I told her the story of the movie. Years later we saw it, and the movie I had in my mind was completely different! When Michael Cristofer came to me with the script, I said, 'Oh, my God, I've been searching for this my whole life.'" Original Sin started filming in Mexico in February 2000 under the title Dancing in the Dark (apparently later changed to avoid confusion with Lars Von Trier's Dancer in the Dark, 2000). The location was only a few miles from where Banderas had filmed The Mask of Zorro (1998). Pedro Armend¿z Jr. was added to the cast due to regulations requiring a Mexican actor in any films shot in Mexico, not a problem considering his notable career of a hundred plus movies. Original Sin was originally planned for a Fall 2000 release but that was pushed back to take advantage of better dates. In fact, between the time of Original Sin's filming and release, Banderas was able to make Spy Kids which opened to generally wide acclaim. A remake of Planet of the Apes might not seem like an especially wonderful idea. What's next? Live-action Scooby Doo? An updated Charlie's Angels? OK, those examples actually exist but you get the point. Expectations about Planet changed, though, when the stylish mood-master Tim Burton signed aboard to direct and enlisted Mark Wahlberg, not only one of the most promising young actors around but somebody with real box-office appeal. Wahlberg will be playing an astronaut on a routine space journey who unexpectedly ends up on a world where intelligent apes rule servile humans. TIM BURTON'S PLANET OF THE APES The story behind this new version stretches all the way back to 1993 when the film first attracted interest as a possible remake. Oliver Stone was co-producing and Arnold Schwarzenegger was tentatively set to star with Philip Noyce (Patriot Games, 1982) directing. This delicate set-up soon collapsed. Over the remaining years there were a variety of people considered for the project: For director, Stone himself, James Cameron, Peter Jackson, Chris Columbus, Robert Rodriguez; For writer, Sam Hamm (Batman, 1989), Graham Yost (Speed, 1994); For stars, Ben Affleck, Ben Kingsley, Gary Oldman, Johnny Depp. These names come from reports in trade papers or reliable sources but with such constant change they may have been little more than temporary considerations. The people who actually made the remake came together in Spring of 2000. That's when the chaos finally settled into Tim Burton directing and Mark Wahlberg starring with key roles of apes going to Helena Bonham Carter, Tim Roth and Michael Clarke Duncan. One unusual choice is Kris Kristofferson as a human rebel. (Oddly enough Wahlberg is doing another remake immediately after Planet, this time of Charade). Filming started last November and took place in L.A., Arizona, Australia and Hawaii. The budget is rumored to be in the $100 million range (as compared to $5 million for the original). Though the story's broad outline is known, the details have been kept tightly guarded with only comments that the film isn't so much a strict remake as a rethinking of the original series. And what about the famous ending of the original? Supposedly Burton and company have avoided that entirely and instead filmed six different endings to confuse any spies or leaks. Linda Harrison, who appeared in the first two original films in the series, says on her website that she's doing a cameo in the new one. There are also unconfirmed rumors of cameos by George Clooney and Spike Jonze (Wahlberg's co-stars in Three Kings and apparently real-life friends). We do know that you can spot Burton regulars Glenn Shadix and Lisa Marie. You might be curious about Charlton Heston, star of the original film. Reports have been sometimes yes and sometimes no about whether he would appear in the remake, supposedly as an ape this time around. Heston apparently did a make up test and was only able to commit to one day's work. Still, he's not currently listed in the cast but who knows what surprises await? ROLLERBALL REMAKE DELAYED TILL THE FALL Due in theatres this fall (after being previously advertised as a summer release) is a hyped-up, 21st Century remake of Rollerball. The new version promises to take full advantage of special effects technology not available for the 1975 original, as well as some apparently fearless stuntmen. The $80 million film is directed by action specialist John McTiernan (Die Hard, Hunt for Red October) and oddly enough marks his second remake in a row of a film originally by Norman Jewison (after The Thomas Crown Affair). The story remains more or less the same: Chris Klein (in the James Caan role) is uncertain about his future until he hears from suddenly wealthy buddy L.L. Cool J about a new underground sport called Rollerball, a mix of roller derby, motorcycling and sheer mayhem. Klein joins Rollerball and soon becomes one of its biggest stars, only to discover that the corporate boss is much more interested in ratings than in their well-being. The remake will be packed with such familiar faces as model Rebecca Romijn-Stamos (The X-Men), Jean Reno (Mission: Impossible) and pop singer Pink. Bring your crash helmets.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the award for Best Director at the 2001 Seattle International Film Festival.

Released in United States Summer August 31, 2001

Released in United States on Video February 19, 2002

Released in United States on Video February 28, 2002

Released in United States 2001

Released in United States August 2001

Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (Gala) May 24 - June 17, 2001.

Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival October 27 - November 4, 2001.

Shown at Urbanworld Film Festival in New York City August 1-5, 2001.

Completed shooting April 13, 1999.

Began shooting March 6, 1999.

Project was workshopped at the Sundance Institute's 1998 January Screenwriters Lab.

Film is a contemporary retelling of William Shakespeare's "Othello."

Released in United States Summer August 31, 2001

Released in United States on Video February 19, 2002

Released in United States on Video February 28, 2002

Released in United States 2001 (Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (Gala) May 24 - June 17, 2001.)

Released in United States 2001 (Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival October 27 - November 4, 2001.)

Released in United States August 2001 (Shown at Urbanworld Film Festival in New York City August 1-5, 2001.)