My Boss's Daughter


1h 30m 2002

Brief Synopsis

The only thing worse than working for the boss from hell is falling in love with the boss from hell's irresistable daughter. Young executive Tom Stanisfield has one eye focused on a promotion from the outrageously volatile Jack Taylor. Unfortunately, the other eye has been captivated by the alluring

Film Details

Also Known As
Boss's Daughter, The, Guests
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2002
Distribution Company
Dimension Films
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

The only thing worse than working for the boss from hell is falling in love with the boss from hell's irresistable daughter. Young executive Tom Stanisfield has one eye focused on a promotion from the outrageously volatile Jack Taylor. Unfortunately, the other eye has been captivated by the alluring Lisa, who just happens to be Mr. Taylor's pride and joy. Offered a rare chance to housesit for Mr. Taylor, Tom is ready to impress his unimpressible boss while simultaneously making his move. Or so he thinks. The evening of his housesitting begins with an ominous doorbell ring and suddenly Tom is faced with a house full of havoc, and the possibility that he might not only lose his mind and his job, but also the girl.

Crew

Darren Adam

Stunts

Mike Ades

Assistant

Rashid Ahmed

Accountant

Pete Anthony

Original Music

Pete Anthony

Music Conductor

Jennifer Apel

Assistant Editor

Nina Arora

Set Production Assistant

Tom Ashton

Song

Jim Bach

Video Playback

Robert Baral

Accountant

Roger Baron

Set Costumer

Eric Batut

Sound Mixer

Anji Bemben

Hair Stylist

Ea Birkett

Assistant Property Master

Susan Bloedorn

Costume Supervisor

Daphne Bloomer

Adr

Peter Boulanger

Stunts

Rob Brady

Best Boy

Rod Britt

Adr

Denis Brock

Chief Lighting Technician

Laurie Brugger

3-D Animator

Corrine Bundschuh

Set Production Assistant

Anne Burke

Costumer

Jonah Burns

Song

Donald Frank Bush

Driver

Jeff Butterworth

Special Effects Coordinator

Teddy Castellucci

Music

Teddy Castellucci

Music Producer

Susan Charest

Stunts

Art Chudabala

Adr

Brian Chumney

Assistant Sound Editor

Corinne Clark

Casting

Samuel Craven

Editor

Travis Crenshaw

Foley Recordist

Kendra Crowther

Office Production Assistant

Ora Crutcher

Medic

Ora Crutcher

Craft Service

Paddy Cullen

Unit Production Manager

Paddy Cullen

Executive Producer

Rosalina Da Silva

Makeup Artist

Jaqueline Dallamore

Accounting Assistant

Clare Davis

Construction Coordinator

Steve Davis

Special Effects Assistant

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Paolo Di Persico

Assistant Camera

W Doherty

Driver

Ian Doig

Animal Wrangler

David Dorfman

Screenplay

Phil Dornfeld

Associate Producer

Ian Douglass

Driver

Glen Dove

Stunts

Dave Driscoll

Driver

Nancy Duggan

Assistant Costume Designer

Mark Dumas

Animal Wrangler

Jason Durocher

Set Production Assistant

Atze Dykstra

Driver

Ashlea Earl

Stunts

Nate Easterling

Song

Nathan Easterling

Assistant Editor

Eric Ebling

3-D Animator

Anita Eglseder

Assistant Camera

Haven Elliot

Set Production Assistant

Joann Ellis

Art Department Coordinator

Bob Ennis

Camera Operator

Ryan Ennis

Stunts

Frank Eulner

Sound Effects Editor

John W Ewing

Driver

R D 'luther' Fairbairn

Property Master

Todd Fairbairn

Lighting Technician

Diane Fatiaki

Caterer

Doug Field

Camera Operator

Chris Fitzgerald

Adr Mixer

Julie Fontaine

On-Set Dresser

James Forsyth

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Kim Foscato

Assistant Sound Editor

Joann Fowler

Makeup Artist

David Funston

3-D Animator

Troy Gabrielson

Song

Andrea Gard

Foley Editor

Daniel Geller

Song

Chris Gibbins

Camera Trainee

Justin Gibson

Song

Chris Glyn-jones

Boom Operator

Marcy Goldman

Adr

Grant Goodman

Security

Travis Graalman

Assistant Editor

Richard Grant

Music Engineer

Art Green

Greensman

Jean-luc Grenier

Dresser

Peter Grotek

Grip

Peter Grotek

Key Grip

Braden Haggerty

Assistant Camera

Stuart Haggerty

Best Boy Electric

Jeffrey M. Hall

Rigging Gaffer

Celia Hallquist

Visual Effects Producer

Joel Hamilton

Music Producer

Greg Hammelink

Song

Jenny Harris

Casting Associate

Salmon Harris

Storyboard Artist

Richard A Harrison

Music Editor

Jeff Harvey

Gaffer

Ruth Hasty

Post-Production Supervisor

Kevin Haverty

Assistant Camera

Tanya Noel Hill

Music Editor

Chuck Hodes

Photography

Tim Hogan

Key Grip

Leah Holmes

Accountant

Elizabeth House

Assistant Camera

Dennis Houser

Transportation Coordinator

Johanne Hubert

Set Decorator

Pierre Hubert

Dolly Grip

Kelvin Humenny

Art Director

Debra Hurst

Assistant Director

Kurt F Jackson

Special Effects Assistant

John L. Jacobs

Producer

Carl Janssen

Transportation Captain

Edward S Johnson

Driver

Ken Johnson

Driver

Melissa Johnson

Script Supervisor

Wayne Johnson

Driver

Tammy Jones

Assistant Camera

Steven Juliani

Music Coordinator

Stogie Kenyatta

Adr

So-ok Kim

3-D Animator

Anu Kiviloo

Art Department

Anna Klich

Animal Trainer

Zach Kmiec

Song

Andy Koessler

Dresser

Richard Kohlen

Hair Stylist

Scott Kozak

Best Boy Grip

Jon Kralt

Stunts

David Kurvers

Video Playback

Ashton Kutcher

Coproducer

Derek Lalonde

Grip

John Lash

Assistant

Woody Lawhon

Animatronics

J Todd Lawley

On-Set Dresser

Andrew James Laws

Production Designer

Mitch Lefleur

Driver

Michael Lemmers

Best Boy Grip

Carl Leveque

Key Rigging Grip

Ryan Lewis

Song

Maria Livingstone

Costume Supervisor

Ross Long

Best Boy Grip

Patrick Lussier

Editor

Bruce Macaulay

Photography

Grace Maceod

Animal Trainer

Mick Mackay

Assistant Director

Brian J Madore

Construction

Brian Magerkurth

Rerecording

Tony Maimone

Music Producer

J.j. Makaro

Unit Director

J.j. Makaro

Stunt Coordinator

Daryl Makortoff

Set Production Assistant

Gabriel Mann

Song Performer

Gabriel Mann

Music Producer

Sharon Markell

Hair Stylist

Martin Mcgrath

Director Of Photography

Julie Mchaffie

Hair Stylist

Bob Mclean

Driver

Meagan Mcleod

Assistant

Danny Mcnair

Assistant Production Coordinator

Dennis Mcneill

Color Timer

Heather Mcphee

Digital Effects Artist

Will Mcrobb

Other

Gary B Mcvarish

Foreman

David Earl Meisner

Driver

Frank 'pepe' Merel

Foley Mixer

Doug Metzger

Assistant Director

Scott E Metzger

3-D Animator

Tony Mgrdichian

Original Music

Terry Mialkowsky

Assistant Location Manager

Sheila Millar

Set Designer

Howard S. Miller

Adr

Steve Miller

On-Set Dresser

Derek Milne

Construction

Mike Mitchell

Stunts

Jennifer Moore

Props

Aleya Naiman

Props Buyer

Ed Nesling

Location Manager

Gil Netter

Producer

Jan Nizen

Production Accountant

Wendy O'brien

Casting Associate

John G Oliver

Transportation Captain

Evan Olson

Song

Evan Olson

Song Performer

Lorie Olson

Assistant Editor

Daniel Orlandi

Costume Designer

Gerald Paetz

Stunts

Jennifer Page

Casting Associate

Steven Page

Song

Clint Paglaro

Video

Debra Paller

Special Effects

Gary Paller

Special Effects Coordinator

Sandra Palmer

Production Coordinator

Suzanne Carole Paolillo

Assistant Editor

John Papsidera

Casting

Ninon Parent

Stunts

Jon Paris

Song Performer

Jon Paris

Song

Film Details

Also Known As
Boss's Daughter, The, Guests
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2002
Distribution Company
Dimension Films
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)


Patrick Cranshaw, the grizzly American character actor who spent the last four decades playing a series of old sidekicks and comic relief in such diverse movies as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) to last year's hit summer film Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005), died of natural causes on December 28 at his Fort Worth, Texas home. He was 86.

Born on June 17, 1919 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, Cranshaw became interested in acting while entertaining the troops with the Army Air Forces during World War II. After the war, he worked in radio, and slogged his way though bit parts in a few films before landing his first notable (if still uncredited) part as a bartender in the Claudette Colbert western Texas Lady (1955). It took a while before he got his next strong part, but he was memorable in his brief scene as the fidgety bank teller in Arthur Penn's classic Bonnie and Clyde (1967); and appeared as a hayseed in some wildly bad camp fare such as Mars Need Women and Hip, Hot and 21 (also 1967).

But so what if the good movie roles weren't coming? Cranshaw, with his small, expressive eyes, crinkled smile, and scraggly white beard, made for an ideal comic foil in sitcoms; and anyone with a passing interest for spotting character actors can't help but be impressed with his resume on that medium in the '70s: (The Odd Couple, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show, Mork and Mindy); the '80s: (The Dukes of Hazzard, Growing Pains, Perfect Strangers, Night Court, Diff'rent Strokes); '90s: (Coach, Ellen, Married...with Children, Just Shoot Me!, The Drew Carey Show); and even the 21st century: (Suddenly Susan, Monk).

Most impressively, Cranshaw should serve as model for all struggling actors that sheer persistency can pay off when you're hungry for some good roles in motion pictures, for he was in well in his seventies when he started gaining some decent screen time in The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), Everyone Says I Love You (1996), and Best in Show (2000). However, his most memorable moment in film came in the Will Ferrell/Vince Vaughn comedy Old School (2003). Here he played a octogenarian frat boy named Blue; and in one terrific sequence, he's dressed in his longjohns ready to wrestle two topless girls but dies of a heart attack due to overexcitement! He may have not won an Oscar® for his performance, but he developed something of cult following after that great comic turn.

Most recently, he played a Derby owner with Lindsay Lohan and Matt Dillon in Disney's Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005); and just completed the movie Air Buddies due for release next year. Cranshaw is survived by three children, Jan Ragland, Joe Cranshaw and Beverly Trautschold; his sister, Billie Gillespie; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)

Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)

Patrick Cranshaw, the grizzly American character actor who spent the last four decades playing a series of old sidekicks and comic relief in such diverse movies as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) to last year's hit summer film Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005), died of natural causes on December 28 at his Fort Worth, Texas home. He was 86. Born on June 17, 1919 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, Cranshaw became interested in acting while entertaining the troops with the Army Air Forces during World War II. After the war, he worked in radio, and slogged his way though bit parts in a few films before landing his first notable (if still uncredited) part as a bartender in the Claudette Colbert western Texas Lady (1955). It took a while before he got his next strong part, but he was memorable in his brief scene as the fidgety bank teller in Arthur Penn's classic Bonnie and Clyde (1967); and appeared as a hayseed in some wildly bad camp fare such as Mars Need Women and Hip, Hot and 21 (also 1967). But so what if the good movie roles weren't coming? Cranshaw, with his small, expressive eyes, crinkled smile, and scraggly white beard, made for an ideal comic foil in sitcoms; and anyone with a passing interest for spotting character actors can't help but be impressed with his resume on that medium in the '70s: (The Odd Couple, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show, Mork and Mindy); the '80s: (The Dukes of Hazzard, Growing Pains, Perfect Strangers, Night Court, Diff'rent Strokes); '90s: (Coach, Ellen, Married...with Children, Just Shoot Me!, The Drew Carey Show); and even the 21st century: (Suddenly Susan, Monk). Most impressively, Cranshaw should serve as model for all struggling actors that sheer persistency can pay off when you're hungry for some good roles in motion pictures, for he was in well in his seventies when he started gaining some decent screen time in The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), Everyone Says I Love You (1996), and Best in Show (2000). However, his most memorable moment in film came in the Will Ferrell/Vince Vaughn comedy Old School (2003). Here he played a octogenarian frat boy named Blue; and in one terrific sequence, he's dressed in his longjohns ready to wrestle two topless girls but dies of a heart attack due to overexcitement! He may have not won an Oscar® for his performance, but he developed something of cult following after that great comic turn. Most recently, he played a Derby owner with Lindsay Lohan and Matt Dillon in Disney's Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005); and just completed the movie Air Buddies due for release next year. Cranshaw is survived by three children, Jan Ragland, Joe Cranshaw and Beverly Trautschold; his sister, Billie Gillespie; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 22, 2003

Released in United States on Video February 3, 2004

Released in United States May 2002

Shown at Cannes Film Festival (market) May 15-26, 2002.

Project was formerly in development at New Line.

Eastman Film

Released in United States Summer August 22, 2003

Released in United States on Video February 3, 2004

Released in United States May 2002 (Shown at Cannes Film Festival (market) May 15-26, 2002.)