The End of the Affair


1h 45m 1999
The End of the Affair

Brief Synopsis

The year is 1939. It is World War II. England is at war. And a tumultuous affair is about to begin that will carry a tragic price tag. A passionate woman trapped inside a sterile marriage, Sarah Miles is immediately and irresistibly attracted to brooding novelist Maurice Bendrix when they meet at a

Film Details

Also Known As
End of the Affair, Fin d'une liaison, La, La Fin d'une liaison, Slutet på historien, fin del romance, El
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Adaptation
Drama
Period
Romance
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Brighton, England, United Kingdom; Shepperton Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom; London, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Synopsis

The year is 1939. It is World War II. England is at war. And a tumultuous affair is about to begin that will carry a tragic price tag. A passionate woman trapped inside a sterile marriage, Sarah Miles is immediately and irresistibly attracted to brooding novelist Maurice Bendrix when they meet at a party given by Sarah's worthy but unexciting civil servant husband, Henry. They begin a passionate, illicit and sexually liberating love affair. But during the Blitz in London, Bendrix' house is hit by a bomb while the couple are in bed, and he is nearly killed. Inexplicably and without warning, Sarah breaks off the relationship. As for Bendrix, he is left utterly bereft... For years following, he is haunted by passionate memories of their affair. When, by chance circumstance, he re-enters her life they confront once more the consuming love they had for each other. In a stunning surprise admission, he will learn the reason for the annihilation of her love.

Crew

Tom Adair

Song

Cameron Allan

Music Producer

Alex Alstone

Song

David Appleby

Photography

Alfonso Artega

Song

Mark Auguste

Sound Editor

Sam Auguste

Assistant Sound Editor

Alexander Balanescu

Soloist

Nicola Barnes

Art Assistant

Jens Baylis

Assistant Editor

Beth Bellson

Stand-In

Al Bennett

Production Assistant

Buddy Bernier

Song

Roger Bernstein

Song

Bob Beton

Driver

Chrissie Beveridge

Hairdresser

Jon Billington

Art Director

John Bohan

Construction Manager

James Brady

Special Effects

Jed Bray

Driver

Toni Brennand

Wardrobe

Tom Brown

Art Assistant

Kate Bryden

Casting Associate

Colin Burgess

Props

John Bush

Set Decorator

Keith Carey

Electrician

Russ Case

Song

David Cheesman

Props

Aron Clayton

Production Assistant

Patrick Clayton

Assistant Director

Sean Clayton

Assistant Director

Michael Connell

Music Editor

Steve Cummings

Driver

Derek Dackombe

Other

Yves De Bono

Special Effects Supervisor

Denny Dennis

Song Performer

B. G. Desylva

Song

Peter Devlin

Driver

Howard Dietz

Song

Diana Dill

Script Supervisor

Patrick Dunne

Driver

Carol Eastwood

Construction

John Eccleston

Post-Production Accountant

Robert D Emmerich

Song

Warren Ewen

Electrician

Susie Figgis

Casting

Chuck Finch

Lighting Technician

Steve Finch

Electrician

Charlotte Finlay

Wardrobe

Michael Finlay

Other

Guy Frost

Other

Valentina Giambanco

Assistant Editor

Heidi Gibb

Art Assistant

Amy Gilliam

Camera Trainee

Alan Gilmore

Other

Martin Goddard

Other

Mark Goodman

Production

Mack Gordon

Song

Matt Gray

Other

Johanna Graysmark

Assistant Art Director

Graham Greene

Source Material (From Novel)

J Greenwood

Song

Alan Grenham

Other

Mark Griffin

Special Effects

Isobel Griffiths

Music Contractor

Alan Groush

Electrician

David Haberfield

Other

Marios Hamboulides

Production Assistant

Sarah Hamilton

Assistant Production Coordinator

Tim Hands

Adr Editor

Bob Harper

Other

Steve Hart

Unit Manager Assistant

Amanda Hawes

Location Assistant

Edwin Hawkins

Other

Peter Hawkins

Other

Libby Hazell

Visual Effects

Gary Hedges

Carpenter

Frans Helmerson

Song Performer

Joe Hobbs

Wardrobe

Ron Hone

Special Effects

Margaret Horspool

Art Director

Phil Hounam

Unit Manager

Austin Ince

Other

Paul Jennings

Stunts

Neil Jordan

Screenplay

Neil Jordan

Producer

Sarah Jordan

Assistant

John Knight

Props

Zoltan Kodaly

Song

Daniel Laurie

Adr

Tony Lawson

Editor

Dominic Lester

Rerecording

John Lewis

Boom Operator

Kevin Lloyd

Production

Sharon Long

Wardrobe Supervisor

Dave Lowery

Carpenter

Simon Lucas

Electrician

Vera Lynn

Song Performer

Clive Mackey

Other

Thomas Maggs

Driver

Colin Manning

Key Grip

Keith Manning

Grip

Paolo Mantini

Hairdresser

Thomas Martin

Carpenter

Graham Martyr

Other

Richard Mcgee

Special Thanks To

Stephanie Mcgee

Special Thanks To

Jack Mckenzie

Other

Damon Meredith

Assistant Location Manager

Billy Merrell

Lighting

Kelly Messias

Assistant

Joseph Meyer

Song

Dave Midson

Other

Steve Mitchell

Scenic Artist

Steve Morphew

Stand-In

Ali Moshref

Accounting Assistant

Trevor Neighbour

Digital Effects Supervisor

Mark Nelmes

Visual Effects Supervisor

Horatio Nicholls

Song

Michael Nyman

Music

Robin O'donoghue

Rerecording

Daniel O'regan

Carpenter

Danny O'regan

Carpenter

John O'shaughnessy

Production

Tom O'sullivan

Electrician

Elaine Offers

Makeup

Peter Ogunsalu

Assistant

Alex Payman

Art Department

Maggie Phelan

Production Accountant

David Pinnington

Location Manager

Keith Pitt

Props

Greg Powell

Stunt Coordinator

Sandy Powell

Costume Designer

Anthony Pratt

Production Designer

Roger Pratt

Director Of Photography

Roger Pratt

Dp/Cinematographer

Brenda Rawn

Assistant

Christina Rice

Assistant

Frances Richardson

Assistant Production Accountant

Vivien Riley

Makeup

Mike Roberts

Camera Operator

Michael Saxton

Post-Production Supervisor

Arthur Schwartz

Song

Chris Seagers

Art Director

Jackie Shave

Other

Sunita Singh

Wardrobe

David Smith

Production

Deryn Stafford

Production Coordinator

Jo Stafford

Song Performer

David Stephenson

Sound Mixer

Graham Stevens

Stand-In

Michael Stevenson

Assistant Director

Ian Stone

Assistant Director

Johann Strauss

Song

Caroline Streatfield

Special Thanks To

Peter Streatfield

Special Thanks To

Kathy Sykes

Coproducer

Rebecca Symons

Production Assistant

Andre Tabet

Song

Emma Tauber

Art Assistant

Elliot Thomas

Electrician

Bradley Torbett

Props

Jason Torbett

Props

Alf Tramontin

Steadicam Operator

Derek Trigg

Foley Editor

Frank Trumbauer

Song

Matthew Tucker

Lighting

Keith Vowles

Props

Clive Ward

Other

Harry Warren

Song

Gloria West

Song Performer

Tracie Wetherill

Video Assist/Playback

Jason Wheeler

Production Assistant

Derek Whorlow

Production

Berndt Wiese

Other

Anthony Wilcox

Assistant Director

Natasha Wilkinson

Editorial Assistant

Lucy Williams

Location Assistant

Andrew Wilson

Special Effects

Clive Wilson

Props

Julia Wilson-dickson

Dialogue Coach

Robert Wishart

Carpenter

Colin Wood

Sound

Philippa Wood

Post-Production Coordinator

Philippa Wood

Assistant

Jeremy Woodhead

Makeup

Joanne Woollard

Set Decorator

Tony Woollard

Art Director

Stephen Woolley

Producer

Felicity Wright

Hairdresser

Larry Wright

Song

Film Details

Also Known As
End of the Affair, Fin d'une liaison, La, La Fin d'une liaison, Slutet på historien, fin del romance, El
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Adaptation
Drama
Period
Romance
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Brighton, England, United Kingdom; Shepperton Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom; London, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Award Nominations

Best Actress

1999
Julianne Moore

Best Cinematography

1999

Articles

The End of the Affair (1999)


A dense adaptation of one of Graham Greene’s most acclaimed and complex novels scored two nominations at the 72nd Academy Awards. Although it lost in both categories, it remains one of the most faithful adaptations of the writer’s work, a major achievement for writer-director Neil Jordan and a showcase for stars Ralph Fiennes, Julianne Moore and Stephen Rea.

The film opens in 1946, when novelist Maurice Bendrix (Fiennes) runs into an old friend, Henry Miles (Rea), who confides his concern that his wife (Moore) is having an affair. This comes as shock to Bendrix, who had had an affair of his own with Moore during World War II that ended abruptly when he was wounded in an air raid. Bendrix hires a private detective (Ian Hart), who uncovers surprising revelations about his own affair with Moore that make him see his former lover in an entirely new light.

Greene had based his 1951 novel on his own affair with Catherine Walston, whom he was still seeing at the time of the book’s publication. The novel is also informed by his troubled relationship with the Catholic Church and is considered the fourth of his “Catholic novels,” following Brighton Rock, The Power and the Glory and The Heart of the Matter. The book was met with almost universal praise on its publication and is still considered one of the best novels written in English.

Independent producer David Lewis acquired the film rights in 1952 and produced an adaptation with Edward Dmytryk directing Deborah Kerr, Van Johnson and Peter Cushing as wife, lover and husband, respectively. That version met with mostly negative reviews, particularly complaining that the novelist protagonist had become an American so the role could be given to Johnson, whom most critics found too shallow for the role. Nor did it help that Columbia Pictures had recut the film, which originally was to employ Greene’s flashback structure, to tell the story in strict chronological order.

Jordan adhered much more closely to Greene’s novel, with the necessary compression to keep the film to a managable running time (102 minutes). Fiennes seemed the perfect choice for the male lead because Jordan thought he “would convey that disenchanted, embittered 1940s intellectual” (Jordan quoted in The End of the Affair, British Film Directory). He was considering Miranda Richardson and Kristin Scott Thomas for the role of Sarah when he received a letter from Moore asking for the part. He agreed to test her, and the test won her the role. Casting Rea as her husband was a natural choice. The two had made seven films together since Rea had starred in Jordan’s directing debut, Angel (1982), with The Crying Game (1992) their most famous collaboration.

Jordan wanted Elliot Goldenthal, who had worked with him on four other films, to write the score, but Goldenthal was committed to scoring Titus (1999) for his frequent collaborator and partner Julie Taymor. John Barry composed a theme for the film on spec, but Jordan ultimately chose Michael Nyman to do the score. Nyman incorporated phrases from his third string quartet. He would later use parts of the score in his 2005 album The Piano Sings.

The film met with mixed reviews. Janet Maslin of The New York Times called it “intoxicating…the best and most graceful Greene adaptation since The Third Man….this is one more intelligent, brooding love story with a secret twist, and he [Jordan] easily carries the viewer along for the ride.” In contrast, Roger Ebert awarded the film only two-and-a-half stars and called it “as hangdog as Stephen Rea’s face in the first scene. It is the story of characters who desperately require more lightness and folly….” Variety’s Emanuel Levy praised the film and the performances of Fiennes, Moore and Rea while also suggesting that “Strong critical support will be crucial for broadening the appeal of his ultraromantic period drama….”

With only mixed reviews however, the film failed to break even at the box office, grossing just under $11 million dollars against a $23 million budget. Although Jordan’s screenplay won the BAFTA and an Evening Standard British Film Award, it was an also-ran where U.S. awards are concerned. It was nominated for Best Motion Picture — Drama, Best Director, Best Actress and Best Score at the Golden Globes and lost in all four categories. Oscar nominations went to Moore and cinematographer Roger Pratt, but they lost to Hilary Swank in Boys Don’t Cry and Conrad Hall for American Beauty respectively. One award the picture captured in the U.S. was Best Eyewear, given by GQ Men in recognition of the glasses Fiennes wore in the picture.

Producers: Neil Jordan, Kathy Sykes, Stephen Woolley
Director-Screenplay: Neil Jordan
Based on the novel by Graham Greene
Cinematography: Roger Pratt
Score: Michael Nyman
Cast: Ralph Fiennes (Maurice Bendrix), Stephen Rea (Henry Miles), Julianne Moore (Sarah Miles), Heather-Jay Jones (Henry’s Maid), James Bolam (Mr. Savage), Ian Hart (Mr. Parkis)

The End Of The Affair (1999)

The End of the Affair (1999)

A dense adaptation of one of Graham Greene’s most acclaimed and complex novels scored two nominations at the 72nd Academy Awards. Although it lost in both categories, it remains one of the most faithful adaptations of the writer’s work, a major achievement for writer-director Neil Jordan and a showcase for stars Ralph Fiennes, Julianne Moore and Stephen Rea.The film opens in 1946, when novelist Maurice Bendrix (Fiennes) runs into an old friend, Henry Miles (Rea), who confides his concern that his wife (Moore) is having an affair. This comes as shock to Bendrix, who had had an affair of his own with Moore during World War II that ended abruptly when he was wounded in an air raid. Bendrix hires a private detective (Ian Hart), who uncovers surprising revelations about his own affair with Moore that make him see his former lover in an entirely new light.Greene had based his 1951 novel on his own affair with Catherine Walston, whom he was still seeing at the time of the book’s publication. The novel is also informed by his troubled relationship with the Catholic Church and is considered the fourth of his “Catholic novels,” following Brighton Rock, The Power and the Glory and The Heart of the Matter. The book was met with almost universal praise on its publication and is still considered one of the best novels written in English.Independent producer David Lewis acquired the film rights in 1952 and produced an adaptation with Edward Dmytryk directing Deborah Kerr, Van Johnson and Peter Cushing as wife, lover and husband, respectively. That version met with mostly negative reviews, particularly complaining that the novelist protagonist had become an American so the role could be given to Johnson, whom most critics found too shallow for the role. Nor did it help that Columbia Pictures had recut the film, which originally was to employ Greene’s flashback structure, to tell the story in strict chronological order.Jordan adhered much more closely to Greene’s novel, with the necessary compression to keep the film to a managable running time (102 minutes). Fiennes seemed the perfect choice for the male lead because Jordan thought he “would convey that disenchanted, embittered 1940s intellectual” (Jordan quoted in The End of the Affair, British Film Directory). He was considering Miranda Richardson and Kristin Scott Thomas for the role of Sarah when he received a letter from Moore asking for the part. He agreed to test her, and the test won her the role. Casting Rea as her husband was a natural choice. The two had made seven films together since Rea had starred in Jordan’s directing debut, Angel (1982), with The Crying Game (1992) their most famous collaboration.Jordan wanted Elliot Goldenthal, who had worked with him on four other films, to write the score, but Goldenthal was committed to scoring Titus (1999) for his frequent collaborator and partner Julie Taymor. John Barry composed a theme for the film on spec, but Jordan ultimately chose Michael Nyman to do the score. Nyman incorporated phrases from his third string quartet. He would later use parts of the score in his 2005 album The Piano Sings.The film met with mixed reviews. Janet Maslin of The New York Times called it “intoxicating…the best and most graceful Greene adaptation since The Third Man….this is one more intelligent, brooding love story with a secret twist, and he [Jordan] easily carries the viewer along for the ride.” In contrast, Roger Ebert awarded the film only two-and-a-half stars and called it “as hangdog as Stephen Rea’s face in the first scene. It is the story of characters who desperately require more lightness and folly….” Variety’s Emanuel Levy praised the film and the performances of Fiennes, Moore and Rea while also suggesting that “Strong critical support will be crucial for broadening the appeal of his ultraromantic period drama….”With only mixed reviews however, the film failed to break even at the box office, grossing just under $11 million dollars against a $23 million budget. Although Jordan’s screenplay won the BAFTA and an Evening Standard British Film Award, it was an also-ran where U.S. awards are concerned. It was nominated for Best Motion Picture — Drama, Best Director, Best Actress and Best Score at the Golden Globes and lost in all four categories. Oscar nominations went to Moore and cinematographer Roger Pratt, but they lost to Hilary Swank in Boys Don’t Cry and Conrad Hall for American Beauty respectively. One award the picture captured in the U.S. was Best Eyewear, given by GQ Men in recognition of the glasses Fiennes wore in the picture.Producers: Neil Jordan, Kathy Sykes, Stephen WoolleyDirector-Screenplay: Neil JordanBased on the novel by Graham GreeneCinematography: Roger PrattScore: Michael NymanCast: Ralph Fiennes (Maurice Bendrix), Stephen Rea (Henry Miles), Julianne Moore (Sarah Miles), Heather-Jay Jones (Henry’s Maid), James Bolam (Mr. Savage), Ian Hart (Mr. Parkis)

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Limited Release in United States December 3, 1999

Released in United States Winter December 3, 1999

Wide Release in United States January 21, 2000

Released in United States on Video May 16, 2000

Graham Greene's novel was previously adapted for the screen in director Edward Dmytryk's 1955 UK version, starring Deborah Kerr and Van Johnson.

Began shooting February 15, 1999.

Completed shooting April 30, 1999.

Limited Release in United States December 3, 1999

Released in United States Winter December 3, 1999

Wide Release in United States January 21, 2000

Released in United States on Video May 16, 2000